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Thread: Post and Pier

  1. #1
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    Default Post and Pier

    I am looking at building North of Heay and was curious as to what depth I need to set the posts for a post and pier foundation? In the reading that I have done it says it has to be "X distance from the frost line", anybody have any ideas on what depth the frost line might be in an area with aluvial gravel, birch and white spruce? (most of the black spruce is not where I plan on building)

  2. #2
    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
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    Default Posts?

    I just put mine on a solid gravel base, works fine
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  3. #3
    Member CaptNemo's Avatar
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    I dont remember the name of the thread but if you go back to around Dec07 or Jan08 in this cabin forum there was a lot of discussion on permafrost and foundations. Good luck. CN

  4. #4
    Member SuYentna Dave's Avatar
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    Default Link to do it right the first time

    This was discussed before pg 1 or 2

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=21974


    One point of advice is do it right the first time

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeti View Post
    I am looking at building North of Heay and was curious as to what depth I need to set the posts for a post and pier foundation? In the reading that I have done it says it has to be "X distance from the frost line", anybody have any ideas on what depth the frost line might be in an area with aluvial gravel, birch and white spruce? (most of the black spruce is not where I plan on building)
    Ask your neighbors in the immediate area what they've done or seen. I have a cabin sitting on telephone pole posts sunk 3-4' into water sand with no concrete in the holes. 20 years and it doesn't move. I've seen other guys do bell shaped footings in the bottom of their post holes and their posts jack every winter. The difference is the soil type and how well drained it is. There's no technique that works everywhere.

    If you have access to an excavator the simple answer is deeper is better. If you're hand digging and the soils are wet you might be better off with a raft foundation sitting on the surface. A neighbor of mine did that because he sits on wet ground and his cabin stays perfectly level.

  6. #6

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    Here in Anchorage you bury water lines 10 feet deep for a reason. Healy is colder.

    However, if you have gravelly soil without a lot of fines (silt & clay) and it's not saturated with water, 3-4 feet would be OK.

    Our cabin in Trapper Creek sits on muddy wet soil. The footers are basically sitting on top of the ground (I did dig through the leave litter). No problems so far. The whole cabin simply moves up and down with the frost.

  7. #7
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    Our place here in Fairbanks have surface pads, and the place is level 14 years later. We're on really wet soils. On the other hand, my old place had posts sunk 5 feet down on well-drained soils, and the posts jacked 2-4 inches per year. Finally just put in a woodcrib foundation and my cabin-leveling issues were solved.

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