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Thread: Action to Stock Mounting Ruger M77?

  1. #1

    Default Action to Stock Mounting Ruger M77?

    I just got done adjusting the creep in my M77 7mm Rem Mag and when I put it back together I cranked down the the rear bolt/screw (just in front of the top tang safety) and the tip of the bolt/screw (sticking up) interfered with the movement of the bolt action. I seem to remember running into this this last time I took the action out, which has been a while. My remedy then was to to back the bolt/screw off a little to give the action bolt free clearance. Now I'm wondering if that might have anything to do with the deteriorated accuracy of the rifle?

    I see two solutions...First, grind down the tip of the bolt screw to shorten it...or...Second, put a locking washer in to take up space. If I grind down the bolt, it might be a real hassel to get it to thread again. Anything wrong with using a locking washer?

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  3. #3
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    I think the standard fix, is to file off the bolt. It's not hard to do the threads so they will start.

    If there's room for a washer, I don't see why that wouldn't work too, though.

    Smitty of the North
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  4. #4

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    MontanaRifleman,

    You should always tighten the front receiver lug screw snug first before tightening the rear screw. If you tighten the rear one first it can not only protrude through the receiver but can actually cant the receiver upward in the stock and then when you tighten the front screw it puts things in a bind.

    It could also just be that the old stock is showing some shrinkage from age. If thats the case it is pretty easy to shorten the screw with a grinder with out messing it up. Just keep it flat on the wheel. You can also take the screw with you to your hardware store and find a fine threaded nut that will thread onto the screw. Run the nut down to the bottom of the threads so that it is tight on the screw. This keeps it out of the way while grinding and then when you take the nut off after grinding it will clean up or remove the burrs on the end of the screw caused by the grinder as it comes off!.

    I would stay away from the washer as its going to alter the baring surface of how your action lays in the wood. If you must use the washer put it under the trigger guard!

  5. #5
    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    If I grind down the bolt, it might be a real hassel to get it to thread again. Anything wrong with using a locking washer?
    If you grind it flat you can run a file lightly over the flashing and the threads will be fine, piece of cake...

  6. #6

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    Thanbks ekc,

    I've probably done this operation about 20 -30 times on this rifle, but not much in the past few yew years, and I forgot about the rear screw protruding up. My habit has been to tighten them down equally, but this last time I tightened down the rear screw first, then since the I posted this thread, I noticed I cracked and broke the (aluminum) flange around the front lug screw. So now I need a new trigger guard. Wiil replace with steel. I think this is the second time for this rifle. Anyway, the stock is an after market fiberglass, not the original wood. The rear screw seems to protrude upward slightly more each cycle, so maybe the fiberglass is compressing? There is no room under the trigger guard for a washer, it would have to be between the screw head and the trigger guard flange.

    I think I'll try grinding down the screw tip and see how that works.

    Hopefully this crippled configuration will get me through spring bear season, doubful if I will find a guard before then

    Just picked up my SAKO 300 WSM today but now waiting on the scope and bullets (TTSX 168's)

    Thanks for the input, appreciate it

  7. #7

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    426nut, interesting site, i think if i can get this rifle shooting good groups again I'll go ahead and invest in a McMillan stock. Thanks for the info.

  8. #8

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    Thanks Smitty, I think i'll try grinding down the screw, if it doesn't work maybe I'll just weld it back together

  9. #9
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    Find a nut that fits the screw and twist it on. Then shorten the screw by maybe two turns and then remove the nut. The nut will rethread the screw when it is removed.
    Tennessee

  10. #10
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    [quote=MontanaRifleman;265136]Thanbks ekc,
    I've probably done this operation about 20 -30 times on this rifle, but not much in the past few yew years, and I forgot about the rear screw protruding up. My habit has been to tighten them down equally, but this last time I tightened down the rear screw first, then since the I posted this thread, I noticed I cracked and broke the (aluminum) flange around the front lug screw. So now I need a new trigger guard. Wiil replace with steel. I think this is the second time for this rifle. Anyway, the stock is an after market fiberglass, not the original wood. The rear screw seems to protrude upward slightly more each cycle, so maybe the fiberglass is compressing? There is no room under the trigger guard for a washer, it would have to be between the screw head and the trigger guard flange.


    It is better to fix the problem, not treat the symptom (filing the screw).

    Fix: put some glass bedding where the tang area goes onto the stock, to replace the lost thickness due to compression. When you put the stock back on only tighten the front lug, do not tighten the rear screw, or you will just squeeze the bedding compound out.

    I had to do this twice with my 77 Tang 30-06 with a Brown Precision stock, they seem to be soft, ie. easy to compress.

    I never installed an aluminum piller, but it sounds good too.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    Find a nut that fits the screw and twist it on. Then shorten the screw by maybe two turns and then remove the nut. The nut will rethread the screw when it is removed.
    Real good idea and can't believe I didn't think of it before because I have done just that in the past when grinding bolts down, Anyway, job complete the screw has been ground down and now fits fine.


    Quote Originally Posted by Eastwoods View Post
    It is better to fix the problem, not treat the symptom (filing the screw).
    I agree 100%. My fix for the problem was going to be getting a new stock.

    But, I wasn't sure if it would be worth it, so today I took it to a gunsmith to have it bore scoped and got some bad news. In his opinion, the throat was pretty well burned out and there was a lot of pitting also. He let me check out the bore scope and the pitting was obvious but I wouldn't know a burned out throat from a new one cause I have never looked in a scope before.

    I'll be taking the gun to the range Sat to see how it's shooting and figure out a good working range for it for my spring bear hunting. Hopefully with the lug screw tightened down and all the copper I removed form the bore this week it will be doing a little better than the last time I shot it. I soaked the bore 7 times this week with Wipe Out and there wasn't a trace of copper in it when we bore scopped it.

    I've got about 80 rounds left for it and once they are gone I'll retire it. I like the old tang safety action so maybe I'll resurrect it someday with a new barrel and stock.

    Thanks for all the help guys, I really appreciate it.

  12. #12
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    Find a nut that fits the screw and twist it on. Then shorten the screw by maybe two turns and then remove the nut. The nut will rethread the screw when it is removed.
    This is a great way to help clean up the treads.

    I would not recommend grinding though. Use a single cut file instead. This will give a cleaner end and less burrs on the end. File the screw shorter, then file a 45 degree bevel around the end, then turn the nut off and clean up any burrs that are forced into the open by the nut.

    The problem with the grinder is that it is way to easy to take off to much metal and it is almost impossible to not form burrs at the edge, or to remove them.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by bandhmo View Post
    This is a great way to help clean up the treads.

    I would not recommend grinding though. Use a single cut file instead. This will give a cleaner end and less burrs on the end. File the screw shorter, then file a 45 degree bevel around the end, then turn the nut off and clean up any burrs that are forced into the open by the nut.

    The problem with the grinder is that it is way to easy to take off to much metal and it is almost impossible to not form burrs at the edge, or to remove them.
    You have to use a grinder with the right wheel (a fine one) and a good guard set up. My grinder has a magnifying glass attachment that brings it right up close. It was intended for this type of work. I wouldn't try this with the same set up that I sharpen mower blades with!

  14. #14

    Default montanarifleman-- new sako?

    Did you get one of the new sako 85's?
    I handled both the 300 and a 30-06 and I was sorely tempted to get one after feeling how nicely the action worked- great fit and finish. Now I have to decide what to sell off in order to rationalize the purchase.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by 426nut View Post
    Did you get one of the new sako 85's?
    I handled both the 300 and a 30-06 and I was sorely tempted to get one after feeling how nicely the action worked- great fit and finish. Now I have to decide what to sell off in order to rationalize the purchase.
    Yep, got the 85 Finnlight in 300 WSM. Really nice rifle. I also put a Night Force scope 5 1/2 x 22 x 50 on lay away and saving up the $ to pick that up.

    I dont think you can go wrong with a SAKO. IMO one of the best production rifles on the market. I like the fact that they test fire a 5 shot group from them and guarantee the accuracy. Would be nice if they put an aluminum bedding block int the stock Like HS precision does. I may upgrade to that stock in the future, I'll see how this one does for now.

  16. #16
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Any time you want to shorten a screw, make a screw gizzy. You take a flat peice of steel stock any thickness from 1/8" to 1/4". Drill and tap the hole for the screw you want to shorten. Run the screw into your gizzy. Put the screw up to your grinder/sander, with a screw driver in the slot, turn the screw.

    After you think you ground enough off, unscrew from the gizzy, run it into the action.

    Touch up the end of the screw on the fresh metal, with cold blue so it will not rust.

    Takes longer to tell you how, than it does to do it.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  17. #17

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    Took the 7mm out to the range today and first shot was 2.1 high and 0.2 left... just about perfect. My hopes were up but soon disappointed as the second shot hit 2" up and left of the first. In two, five shot groups four of the bullets grouped about 1 1/2" an 2", with a flyer in each out to about 2.8". At 200yds, the five shot group was 5.5". I only got in three shots at 300 yds cause we had to get going. Two were 3" apart and the third was off the bottom of the paper, not sure how far.

    So it looks like 200 - 250 yds will be max range.

    The sooner I get the 300 WSM on line, the better.

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