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Thread: Bedding by a novice

  1. #1

    Default Bedding by a novice

    I am not a gun smith, or even experienced tinker. I am pretty new at altering firearms from factory configurations, but I had a good time and good experience with this project so I figured I'd share the details.

    The gun chosen is a Ruger M77 Mk II in .243W. I always wanted a Ruger project gun since everyone that has "custom guns" start with Remingtons and Savages and the such. It seems I bought it new for a small predator and bou hunting, but like everyone else here, I want more accuracy. I have a load that I like right now, but havent shot anything bigger than paper yet. It isnt my "ideal" round, but it will do for now: 100gr Speer StzBt with a soft point on top of Varget powder. I played with powder charges and seating depts to get the best 100 group of about an inch. The worst group was around 1.5 inches, so it wasnt too bad to begin with. Anyways, on with the bedding.

    I didnt cut away any wood prior, or even cut off the finish. I know I probably should have, but I felt it was rough enough already and I am not really set up with gunsmithing tools. Anyways, I took it apart and cleaned any dirt and the such, and taped it off good. I use $1.25 playdough to block off areas i didnt want the glass to run, but I chose the gel (I'll have to post the brand tomorrow) and didnt have a problem with running at all. In fact, a little running might have been more helpful, but this is my first trip so maybe i needed the gel. I built up around the recoil lug and filled in the hole. I didnt track the whole receiver back because, well, I didnt think about it. I was intrested in the front around the recoil lug and the rear of the action. Hind-sight's 20/20 huh? I didnt over-dose the rear because i didnt want it to run out over the stock when I put the receiver back on. I was careful in all areas not to add too much, so I had very little to trim up afterwards. The bedding kit came with a release agent, but I heard a lot of bad stuff like it will cause my metals to rust, so I went with Pam instead. Worked like a champ. I sprayed down the whole action and 6" of the barrel and planted it in the stock. I put all 3 screws back in, but only snugged them up. I checked the barrel for clearance, but it was floated before I ever shot the gun. Theres a little more clearance now, but doesnt look out of place, so all is good. It did take a little while to break it apart because the rubbing while putting it together thinned out the Pam too much and the glass had a bit of a bond with the metal. A few whacks with the rubber mallot and it did come apart. I had one screw try to lock up, but with a little persuasion, I was able to get it out without any damage. I'll add more release agent to the screws next time. I took it apart cleaned everything, checked clearances and over-runs, and all was good. Ugly, but good.
    Here a couple pics of the project. I think I will have to bed my .338 next...
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  2. #2

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    1st is bottom view after seating
    2nd is recoil lug area after seperated
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  3. #3

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    The cured bedding...its quite ugly, I know, but when assembles, its totally unnoticeable.
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  4. #4

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    Here the bottom of the receiver... and then the gun reassembled after clean-up.
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  5. #5

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    I didnt get the clearance as far back as I wanted on the barrel, but its pretty good. It feels real tight and stout, but I havent shot it yet. I just finished it today so I plan to wait until Friday or Saturdy before I shoot it. I dont know what the recommended wait time for curing is, but I will give it a few days. there no way to start over...
    If I left anything out, or if anyone is intrested in anything else, feel free to ask and I will answer the best I can. Like I said, I'm no gunsmith and this was my first attempt at this. Anybody can do it as long as you read the directions and take your time.
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  6. #6
    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    Nice job. Function before fashion anyways, but you can't see what is underneath can you. I have read that it is a good idea to glass small sections at a time and then check accuracy afterwards... once you get the accuracy you are looking for you might want to stop so you don't mess anything up. The recoil lug and rear tang areas seem like good places to get started to me. Glad to see you got the job done on a Ruger, many people complain about the recoil lug and how hard it is to bed, but looks like you did great. Was the screw that goes into the recoil lug the one that got stuck? I'll be doing this same job with Acraglas Gel later on next month probably, so any info is awesome!

    Nice pics too!

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by schmidty_dog View Post
    Was the screw that goes into the recoil lug the one that got stuck? I'll be doing this same job with Acraglas Gel later on next month probably, so any info is awesome!

    Nice pics too!
    Thanks! Yep, that was screw! I tried to putty around it, but i couldt get anything to work, so I just dosed the screw down with Pam and sent it through the bedding. Figured it'd just hold it that much tighter...I cleaned the threads after I disassembled it. Went back in way easier.
    Acraglas Gel is what I used. It was okay to work. It didnt run at all, very thick stuff.

  8. #8

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    I'd say your first bedding job turned out better than my first attempt. I really don't even know for sure how good mine was cuz I never got the gun apart! Yup it became a one piece unit for life that day. A local gunsmith helped me with the project. He bought Brownell's Acraglas resin and hardener in the bulk but came up with the release agent somewhere else. That was 30 years ago and I still use Brownells Acraglas resin and hardener but have since added their release agent as well. I have probably bedded 20 guns since that first srew up and haven't had a problem.

    I always fill the front and rear action screw holes with glass and count on the release agent to do its job and allow the screws to break loose when finished and it always does. I always mix up a little more resin and hardener than is needed and then set the surplus aside so I can use it to tell at what stage in the cure process the glass is in. When the surplus hardens to the point where it is no longer tacky I then back out both action screws one full turn and then snug them back down. This ensures that they will come loose upon full cure!

    I'd say your job looks good! The front lug especially and thats the hard part on ruger 77!

  9. #9

    Default TIP

    Coat the screws and threads with Johnson paste wax to prevent them from getting stuck, then you can overspray with Pam.
    Put the bedded action in a freezer for several hours. This makes the action pop out of the stock easier.
    A good first job though.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  10. #10

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    Put the bedded action in the freezer? Just proves your never to old to learn something new! Thanks! I'm gonna remember that!

  11. #11
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    When the screws are "stuck". Heat up the proper fitting screw driver and then touch the screw driver to the screw and allow the heat from it to radiate to the screw for about 15-30 seconds.
    Viola! Remove the screw.
    Tennessee

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