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Thread: anchor questions

  1. #1

    Default anchor questions

    Okay the second anchor, how improtant is that? Does everyone carry one or just if you are planning several nights out? The rode, How long do you make the chain portion? twelve ft., six ft. ? How much rode do you carry say for average anchoring. The boat came with 175tf. But that isn't enough for an emergency deep water anchorage. I am thinking one needs 600' is that overkill or am I underestimating? At least I knew what to call it. Thanks in advance!

  2. #2

    Default

    I always figured for sports boats, (30' and under), one should have at least the same length of chain as the boat is long. I also like the 3/8" chain size as it has sufficient weight to keep the anchor pulling with the bottom not off the bottom.

    Having enough scope is always prudent but if you want that extra piece of mind during an overnight stay, simply attach a small shackle to a 10lb cannonball to the anchor line after you've "set" the anchor, let it run down to the head of the chain...just be sure the shackle is too small to climb over the first link of chain. You'll sleep much better during a windy night.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wasillaguy View Post
    I always figured for sports boats, (30' and under), one should have at least the same length of chain as the boat is long. I also like the 3/8" chain size as it has sufficient weight to keep the anchor pulling with the bottom not off the bottom.

    Having enough scope is always prudent but if you want that extra piece of mind during an overnight stay, simply attach a small shackle to a 10lb cannonball to the anchor line after you've "set" the anchor, let it run down to the head of the chain...just be sure the shackle is too small to climb over the first link of chain. You'll sleep much better during a windy night.
    What is the 10lb cannon ball for? Does this do somehting for the scope, or extra security for overnight anchoring? I am also trying to learn some anchoring tricks, so the more info, the better!

  4. #4
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    Default

    I thought a lot about this last year when I bought my 22' boat. I ended up choosing 300' plus 20' 5/16" or 3/8" chain. Hooks up great even when I am 250' deep. If I spent nights on the water, I would go with 600'. As far as safety, consider the fact that once you drift off the shoreline "shelf", you quickly get into water that exceeds 600'. You do get more chance to hook up in emergency, but it also takes up more space on the boat.

    Gugs

  5. #5

    Default

    The cannonball slides down your "rope" line, whatever type of line you have which usually has a factory eye at the end, a shackle from there to your first link of chain, then whatever chain length to a shackle to the anchor. Now, if you are anchoring for an overnight stay, usually you'll want to find a nice anchoring location in a small cove or something that is protected from the wave action should it get windy during the night. My target depth for anchoring varies on which location I'm in (as well as being crowded out of the good spots); however, I almost always shoot for about 35'-50' median tide level. Love 40', it's perfect. You don't end up with a ton of extra line out to still have scope, and you are still close enough to the anchor to feel the flukes hook up in the rock or whatever while someone backs down on it for you.

    The cannonball, ok, once hooked up and happy w/ your set and scope, you attach the ball to the line w/ a shackle and when it slides down it won't go beyond the first link of chain thereby increasing the effectiveness of the anchor chain by a "huge" factor. Now if the wind comes up, it would have to be near gail force winds (you get the point) to lift the chain high enough to pull the anchor out of its hold. Nearly all of the surge effect from the boat being moved is taken up in just trying to lift the cannonball and chain, not the anchor.

    Hope this helps.

  6. #6

    Default where do you find cannon balls

    Hey thanks, I like the cannon ball idea but where do you find one? I was also wondering about the rode storage problem. Does any one just keep the spool and respool the line. Seems like that would be easier than a big pile of rope, oops, rode, laying around getting tangled. 175 ft fits in a crate that we have but the 600 ft would be a nightmare! Anyone else carry the second anchor?

  7. #7
    Member akfun's Avatar
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    Default

    i dont carry or use a second anchor, but u have 600' of 1/2" anchor rope,30' 5/16 chain and a 22# anchor. at night when i am staying i will go into 60' of water. if i'm fishing at anchor which is rare i will only drop anchor 300' or under. 600' of rope is alot to pull even with a bouy. and i have enough storage under deck for everything but the anchor. jeff

  8. #8
    Member DMan's Avatar
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    Default

    I have 600' of rode and 26' of 5/16 chain with a 22 lbs anchor. Never had an issue with dragging off anchor especially at night in 40-120 feet of water.
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  9. #9

    Default Rode Storage - You got to "Stack it"

    The only way to hand stow rode is in a tote, locker or bag.
    The rode must be "stacked" where you feed it into the tote or locker by piling it in on top of itself. I am sure there is an official nautical term for this but I don't know what it is.......You can even step on it to pack it in. This way it will feed out without tangling. If you try to wrap it around something by hand or coil it you will take forever to do it and wind up with a birds nest or bad twist.

    600 feet takes a lot of space to store. I just built (screw and bolt) an aluminum frame/skin rope locker into the front of the bow pit on my Wooldridge 20ft Sport that just barely holds the 600 feet and chain and still leaves enough space for a guy to stand and turn around behind the locker. An anchor mount for storing the anchor on the bow also helps a lot and saves space. My days with a big cardboard box on the floor in the cabin with the anchor laying on top are over!

  10. #10
    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
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    Default You "coil" your line.

    That's the term...

  11. #11
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cliffhanger View Post
    That's the term...
    Coil it and you'll have a mess on your hands when you try to set it back out. Much better if you just flake it into the container or rope locker. If you use braided rope, nylon double braid is really nice, it will flake a lot better and stow into a smaller area. I like to say a soft lay rope likes to "snot" down better for storage .
    I have a 33lb Bruce anchor, 30ft of 3/8" chain and 250ft of 7/8" nylon double braid for a anchor set up and of course another complete anchor set up just in case.

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  12. #12
    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
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    Default Rode Storage

    My Hewes has a storage locker in the bow, that easily holds 600' of 1/2" and anchor.
    2003 220 Hewescraft Sea Runner 115 Yam'y, Soft Top "Schmidt Happens"

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