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Thread: How about steel buildings in Alaska

  1. #1
    Member frankd4's Avatar
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    Default How about steel buildings in Alaska

    Any body living in stell buildings, How do they hold up?
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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Steel pole buildings and commercial steel buildings are all over the place in Alaska. However, I know of few people that live in them.

    I have a steel clad pole barn at my business, and my main store is a 10,000 sqft structural steel building. I can see no reason why a guy couldn't live in either one of them.

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    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
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    Default Steel Building

    prices have gone up so much in the last year, you certainly woudl want to complare to stick frame cost.
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    Default Thanks for the info

    Thank you for your replies, I was thinking of a large steel buld. half shop half living space. I will be heading back in july still try to figure were I want to live in Alaska, it's hard to find some thing the wife and I can agree on. Once again thank you.
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  5. #5

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    I'm a steel building builder. They go up pretty quick (the shell) and are real stout. I personally would not recommend a pole building type structure unless you're building a barn with a dirt floor and the steel building will be stronger and last longer for that too as well as a better property investment. If you want a wood frame structure, I would recommend pouring a monolithic concrete slab and build your wood frame on that as to sticking poles in the ground.

    If you're interested, give me a PM, and I can put you in touch with my supplier who has supplied me with quality buildings at a good price. I can also give you design and errection tips.

    BTW, steel prices have been going up scince Jan and are expected to continue through the nd of the summer. Have seen 27% increases since Jan and expect about 20% more.

    Mark

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Default Snow Loads

    One thing that hasnt been mentioned, if your looking at metal building frames (especially from private parties) make sure that the building frame and bay spacing is adequate to handle the snow and seismic loading for your area. I've seen alot of metal building frames for sale that might be fine in wasilla but would not handle the 100 psf snow load requirments in other parts of the state. From what Ive seen, metal buildings can be a very competive way to build vs. stick frame. At least for the foundation/shell.

  7. #7

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    The steel building industry is a very competitive business. If you don't know what you're doing you could easily get caught with some hidden costs (road bumps), such as shipping costs that might not be included in the package price....or shipping increases... or other things. There are some reputable companies out there and there are some swindlers.

    Pre-engineered maunfactured steel building packages are engineered for snow load, wind load, exposure factor and seismic category, which you need to provide to the manufacturer. These buildings come with state certified plans. One little trick that some companies do is to check the snow load you provide them and if they find the actual for that specific location is greater, then they will hit you with a re-engineering fee and additional materials cost after you have made the down payment. They have some other tricks also.

    I have a good relationship with my supplier and they don't play games as long as they want my business.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Wow a thread on money for stimulation and now MontanaRifleman is giving out erection tips.... This site is really going down hill fast

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    Member JimmyShine's Avatar
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    Default

    I lived in one for 15 years. I'd built a 12'X20' 1-room apartment (with an additional 5'X12' bathroom/laundry room) inside. lol, that's why I'd have no problem living in a converted bus

    The barn was of pole-type construction. Unless you're building a fairly large building, I'd have to think steel (framing) would be an expensive method of building.

  10. #10
    Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    I priced it out a few years back and I think it's about a wash. I was pricing "Red Iron" not pole buildings, which would be less dollars. I can't find quite the right design and the way steel is rising, I most likely will go conventional with a metal roof.

    Wyatt

  11. #11

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    Wood frame is cheaper in smaller buildings, but larger clear span like 50' x 100' is cheaper than the wood frames.

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    Default Steel Buildings

    Yes I have been living in a steel building for years.
    I contacted MBMI Metal buildings and they helped me put together exactly what I needed. They built me a metal frame roof system and suggested that I use a stuco finish on the outside. They also helped me insulate my building.

    I highly recommend MBMI: http:www.mbmi.biz

  13. #13

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    Mike
    Where are you located?
    What did you build?

  14. #14
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    Just drive around some of the little airports in Alaska, lots of people are living in 'Hanagar houses'. I work for this guy:
    http://www.arcticfoxsteelbuildings.com
    I've put up a lot of steel buildings that people were going to be living in.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Regardless of who erects it, there is one big underlying issue with most metal building construction. The hot roof. I have R-50 worth of insulation in my store's roof, but no airspace. My snowmelt and ice issues were HUGE until I ended up modifying the roof this summer. I ended up building a second roof over it that had 5 1/2" of vented airspace. This cured the issue, but it was not cheap with 10,000 sqft to fix. I was assured by all the contractors that bid on my project that ice buildup would not be an issue, but they were totally wrong.

    If you are in real snow country demand a vented roof of some sort.
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    Default Roof Insulation

    AK Doug
    What method of insulating did you use for the roof of your structure and what temp did you keep it inside? We put up a steel building (50'x100') with no air space in the attic and i was concerned about the possibility of ice buildup, but it wasn't an issue. True, it was in Michigan where the temperatures are not as extreme as Alaskas' interior.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Supposedly R49with "Simple Saver" cloth for vapor barrier. Temps inside the building are 70deg as it is a retail space. The local grocery store went with a similar sized building and similar insulation and also has HUGE ice problems. I have snow on the roof from the first week of October through into the beginning of May most years. No melt offs like what happens down south.
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  18. #18
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    Default Foremost Buildings

    We put up a "Foremost" building and it had around 2.5" wall panels and 4" roof panels if i remember. The panels are foam sandwiched between sheet metal. Go to www.foremostbuildings.comand check them out. It went up real slick. The company was very helpful in answering any questions we had and showed excellent customer service.
    The weather ranges between -20 and +40 farenheit from November to April and gets between 200" and 400" annual snowfall. There is snow on the roof from November to April. The inside is kept at 60 degrees. I never thought it would have worked without the air space between the roof deck and the insulation, but it has. It is definetly a company to consider if a steel building is in your future.

  19. #19
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    You can get insulated panels with any building manufacturer, and if you can afford it, its the way to go. Lately we've been doing a standing seam type roof panel that seems to be a good system. No exposed fasteners through the roof means no leaks.
    'Simple Saver' probably looks good on paper, but in my experience never works out like its supposed to.
    I think a big part of the problem with steel buildings is the thermal penetration of the purlins in the roof. Cold, or warm, just goes right though unless you have a good thermal break, (or insulated panels).

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