Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Anybody else use FOBs vs. Fletches?

  1. #1

    Arrow Anybody else use FOBs vs. Fletches?

    Has anybody else used a "FOB" from starrflight dot com?

    It's a little plastic whirly-gig that fits between the nock and arrow. I blew about $23 including shipping for 13 of these things and they arrived the other day. Got sick of fletch problems, refletching, removing old glue from paper-thin carbon arrows, etc. I've only been shooting since February but I shoot a lot.

    It sounds like a gimmick and looks like a gimmick. They look stupid until you get used to them, but they work great for me, I'm not going back. They need a drop-away rest though. Mine is a RipCord - works perfect. These have really improved my shooting, especially at 30 and 40 yards. SlickTrick broadheads hit very close to field points with FOBs spinning them. They are supposed to pop off when you do a pass-thru on an animal.

    Anybody else use these?

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chugiak, AK
    Posts
    40

    Default

    I've been doing some testing with FOBs and I'm impressed with them. I have tested the many of the statements made on the website and, so far, the statements seem sound compared to my results. My conclussions on the FOB so far:

    Pros -- They stabilize the arrow much better
    I've compared with fletchings to include vanes and feathers, offset, helical and with two sizes of Quick Spin vanes
    Fixed blade broadheads group better -- even when I have intentionally shot with a bent blade
    Easier to attach a FOB than to fletch an arrow
    Simple to orient the broadhead as you want it (vertical, horizontal or angled) -- rotate the shaft while on the bowstring

    Cons -- I've broken several because they are rigid and have a diameter of 1" and don't compress like fletchings. I get better shot groups and that costs breakage even at 40 yards.
    If you are going to shoot them regularly, it will cost you in broken FOBs
    After a shoot through on a animal it may be difficult to find the shaft -- I've painted the rear of my arrows in bright colors

    I will shoot vanes for most of my practice sessions. When I shoot FOBs I plan to shoot a single arrow per target (even though I like to shoot groups). I will shoot FOBs for hunting.

  3. #3

    Default

    Right, I do not shoot groups anymore, I just use a 5-spot. I've broken two FOBs in the 4 days I've been using them - one through a partially-melted crusty snowbank, and one by hitting another arrow. But it only takes a few seconds to change one, and I can let the arrows just roll around in my soft case without worrying about keeping the fletches pristine. I'm done with fletches. With my setup, these are far more accurate and durable than fletches, at least the "cheap" ones (Duravane) I was using. Good idea painting the end of the arrow for hunting. I'll be bowhunting for the first time this spring.

  4. #4
    Member ruvimarrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    94

    Default

    I too have tried them aaand it depends how and what your going to use em.

    since the arrows i buy are pre fletched i was going to use the fob to replace some of the ripped or cut of vanes that i had from pass though card bourd or from BHs.

    So in january when it was still cold i went to basment and did some testing (speed,cleareanc ect. )
    the speed was same and it was not touching anywere so i thought well looks like i dont need to change anything


    so a week later i went outside and shot some vanes and then shot some fobs and the empact was signifantly differnt like almost 2 feet at 40 yards

    and the fobs were hiting a lot lower too.

    so i prety much quit using them because if i would want to use them i would have to shoot only fobs since empact is difrent and setup bow for only fobs

    I do not see why they would empact lower though because i weighd the vanes verse fobs and they were with in a few grains

    only thing i noteced is the noise they make so maybe it is having more
    risistance when in flight ?

    so what about you guys have you tried the fobs verse vanes and have you needed to change anything ?
    maybe it is just my setup though

    i shoot The General with Trophy ridge vertical drop rest

  5. #5

    Default

    I'm using a RipCord drop-away rest. My bow was paper-tuned with a fletched arrow and I know it was perfect before trying FOBs. I'll probably need to keep a fletched arrow around for tuning. I have only been shooting for 3 months so I don't have any emotional attachment to vanes. Now with FOBs, when I back up to 40 yards shooting at 4" 5-spot targets, I actually have a decent chance of getting an arrow in each spot. I did end up adjusting my sights a little - they were hitting a couple inches low. It would be interesting to compare velocity with vanes at 40 yards. You can hear a slight hiss as they fly. Being new, I want to remove as many variables as possible so I can work on my own shooting consistency. FOB's are all identical. With vanes, it always seems one is bent a little differently than the others, and I always wondered how that affects grouping. Bottom line is, I'm sticking with FOB's, all my pins are sighted in with them, and the SlickTrick broadheads still fly identically to field points.

    What do you think these things will do to spruce hen meat? I guess I can go for head shots - the FOB may act like a guillotine on near misses.

  6. #6
    Member Matt M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    189

    Default

    I picked some up and have been using them for a few weeks. They work for me and fly as a fletched arrow does. I would not shot groups as they will get broken. I think I will use arrow wraps to help me find my arrow shafts.


    Matt M

  7. #7

    Default fobs

    I also have tried the fobs and they are great for those long distance shots. I noticed that a few folks said that they where hitting lower than with vanes. I think maybe that has to do with fobs make you change your anchor point. If you move that anchor point to a higher or lower point it will definelty change your point of impact. I like em but at 20 dollars a dozen and they break so easy, I think i might go back to using blazers.

  8. #8
    Member Paul Morris's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Howdy all!

    I herd there was some FOB talk here so thought I would join in if that is OK? I promise NEVER to try and sell anything. Just answer question and help.

    My background is Mechanical Engineering. I had spent the better part of 12 years working at a rocket ranch (Hughes Missile Systems). I am also lucky enough to say I have not missed an archery Elk hunt in close to 30 years now. I am even luckier to say it has been with the same group of friends. My thoughts regarding bodies in motion come from crunching the numbers. My thoughts regarding arrow flight comes from hunting and the frustration of getting a broadhead to fly.

    Quote Originally Posted by ruvimarrow View Post
    I too have tried them aaand it depends how and what your going to use em.

    since the arrows i buy are pre fletched i was going to use the fob to replace some of the ripped or cut of vanes that i had from pass though card bourd or from BHs.

    So in january when it was still cold i went to basment and did some testing (speed,cleareanc ect. )
    the speed was same and it was not touching anywere so i thought well looks like i dont need to change anything


    so a week later i went outside and shot some vanes and then shot some fobs and the empact was signifantly differnt like almost 2 feet at 40 yards

    and the fobs were hiting a lot lower too.

    so i prety much quit using them because if i would want to use them i would have to shoot only fobs since empact is difrent and setup bow for only fobs

    I do not see why they would empact lower though because i weighd the vanes verse fobs and they were with in a few grains

    only thing i noteced is the noise they make so maybe it is having more
    risistance when in flight ?

    so what about you guys have you tried the fobs verse vanes and have you needed to change anything ?
    maybe it is just my setup though

    i shoot The General with Trophy ridge vertical drop rest
    If your point of impact was that far low with FOBs I suspect on of two things. Rest contact or string pinch with the FOB at full draw.

    I would suggest to do a powder test and see if the FOB is making contact with the rest or arrow guide.

    I also use the TR drop zone (have for about 5 years ) The one place to check with this rest is the rubber peel and stick arrow guide. I bet the FOB is hitting it. You can trim it down a tad for clearance and it will still work great.

    I am here to Help! Please let me know how thing look after you check for string pinch and rest/arrow guide contact and we will go from there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Landis View Post
    Right, I do not shoot groups anymore, I just use a 5-spot. I've broken two FOBs in the 4 days I've been using them - one through a partially-melted crusty snowbank, and one by hitting another arrow. But it only takes a few seconds to change one, and I can let the arrows just roll around in my soft case without worrying about keeping the fletches pristine. I'm done with fletches. With my setup, these are far more accurate and durable than fletches, at least the "cheap" ones (Duravane) I was using. Good idea painting the end of the arrow for hunting. I'll be bowhunting for the first time this spring.
    Although shooting groups is not recommended, the flip side is that you can now go roving/stump shooting without any fear of tearing up a fletch. One of the most fun we have here is roving with a group out in the desert and shoot punky logs, dead cactus etc… All unknown yardage and we get hundreds of pass through shoots and the FOB will last forever. A fletch would get torn to pieces the first shot. If we were using fletching, there would be no way we would have this much fun practicing because of fletch damage.

    If you do like to shoot groups (So do I), you can set up a cheep 2 or 3" wide foam target in front of your block target at least an arrows length away. Then when you have a pass through, the FOB will pop off (undamaged for re-use) and you can try and shoot the same hole. Those ballistic peel and stick gun targets make for a good spot indicator. They turn from black to green when you make a hit.

    For target practice, make sure your nocks are not too tight. If a FOB hits another FOB coming in, the second arrow FOB should just pop off with any damage to either FOB. Now for hunting I prefer I tighter fit nock.

    re: Noise-Lots of data on this one. The noise generated by the FOB comes off the back end of the FOB which is directed right at the shooter and sounds different. This is caused by the air being compressed and de-compressed (this is how we get so much bang for the buck). When ever someone calls and says the FOB makes to much noise, I suggest that they stand SAFELY at the target end (behind a tree or something) and have someone shoot a broadhead at the target and compare to a fletch. So far most everyone who tries this agrees that the FOB makes less noise or no more than fletching. A fletch will fold and flutter under load and makes noise. The FOB sounds the same regardless of conditions as it does not deform. Over the last few years we have had many folks harvest lots of game and nobody ever has had an issue with noise. Again, the noise from the FOB comes off the back end is directed right at the shooter.

    Take a look at these links to some noise testing.

    http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=524965&highlight=fobs+starrflight

    http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=509314


    If anyone has any questions or problems, I am here to help!

    Regards,

    Paul
    StarrFlight

  9. #9

    Default

    Paul -

    Good suggestion about using foam in front of the target to pop the FOB off. I think the peel-off targets you reference are called Shoot-n-See. I'll try that. All I need now is a way to shoot 3D targets with a group of people and not get my FOB's hammered.

    I'm also an engineer and one thing that attracted me to FOBs was the consistency I could get from arrow to arrow. If I had never seen an arrow before and wanted to design something to stabilize it in flight, in the year 2008 why would I glue fake feathers to the sides? Traditional archery may be a different argument, but my new compound bow is a pretty high-tech machine.

    What about paper tuning? Do I need to keep a fletched arrow around for that?

  10. #10
    Member Paul Morris's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Landis View Post
    Paul -

    Good suggestion about using foam in front of the target to pop the FOB off. I think the peel-off targets you reference are called Shoot-n-See. I'll try that. All I need now is a way to shoot 3D targets with a group of people and not get my FOB's hammered.

    I'm also an engineer and one thing that attracted me to FOBs was the consistency I could get from arrow to arrow. If I had never seen an arrow before and wanted to design something to stabilize it in flight, in the year 2008 why would I glue fake feathers to the sides? Traditional archery may be a different argument, but my new compound bow is a pretty high-tech machine.

    What about paper tuning? Do I need to keep a fletched arrow around for that?
    Ha! Shoot-n-see I will have to remember that. Thanks!

    For 3-D I would suggest to use both. For the close up shots where you know folks will be stacking them in tight use a vane. But when you get the standing bear out there at 50+ yards in a cross wind, slowly remove a bare shaft arrow, pull a FOB out of your pocket and pinwheel him. It is fun to keep a few bars shafts with only your nocks in and folks will ask why you do not have a vanes. Just say you forgot to fletch them until you cut one loose. The group you are shooting with will be physiologically damage for the rest of the shoot. Just be sure and get the FOB back in your pocket as soon as possible. It will drive the folks crazy wondering what the heck you just did.

    As far as paper tuning, you can bare shaft tune (easy because the FOBs just pops off).

    I prefer to let my broadhead do the work. I get my bow square up by eye and shoot a few target tips to see how it goes. I may make a few adjustments until I like what I see, then shoot a few broadheads to tell me what I need to adjust.

    I have found no matter how much paper tuning or laser tuning I do, I still have to make minor tweaks with the broadheads. So I figure I might as well just jump right to the broadheads.

    Regards,

  11. #11

    Default

    Fob's are great! I have been using them for a few months and used them to win the MN state tournament in my flight. No one has mentioned the benefit in shooting in a strong wind. Take a 4" fletched arrow and a Fob equipped arrow and look at them sideways. Notice how the fletched arrow has about 6 times the amount of surface area on the side compared to the Fob? Now, what does that mean in a hard cross wind? The Fob arrow will have WAY less wind drift then a fletched arrow. I have tested these at 80 yards with a 25-35mph cross wind and the Fob arrow drifts maybe 3-4 inches when the fletched arrow drifts 12-16. These things are amazing! Now if we could just get some for fat shafts, and some with less face contact, I'll throw away my Blazers for good! Thanks for listening. Worth every penny!

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •