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Thread: best strategy for moose

  1. #1
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Default best strategy for moose

    Well, I'm finally getting serioius about going moose hunting, but is there a method preferred over another? Calling or spot and stalk. Plan on doing a little of both but haven't ever really hunted since we killed our last moose 5 years ago. Got lucky and found a 55" right off the road. Nothing a frontend loader and 4 guys can't handle.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    It all depends on the time of the season and the terrain you find yourself in. While calling can work early, typically early-season moose hunting is more focused on spot and stalk. When mid to late season rolls around, though, moose become much more receptive to calling. At that point you'd likely find more success by picking a single location and staying put while calling.

  3. #3
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default A couple tips...

    In the thick brush of southcentral, a tried and true method is to find a "moosey" area to still hunt (which will usually also be a wet, swampy area). Still hunt via a high ground spot or a tree stand. Quietly get in place before daylight. As day comes on, moose tend to retreat to heavy cover and nap, though they do move around a few times a day to feed.

    They will hear you coming for miles away, so stalking is a difficult option. They can walk through swampy muck at 10 times the speed you can run on an asphalt track, so once they hear you and think you are a threat, they are gone. That said, if you crash through the brush and make a bunch of noise while carrying a short canoe paddle, you can often waltz right up to close rifle range without spooking them away. It's trying to be "sneaky" that gets them on full alert as you are showing yourself as a predator.
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  4. #4
    Member DMan's Avatar
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    Early season spot and stalk.

    Mid season thrashing brush can work to bring them in if they are curious. I still hunt in a spot and stalk style with some thrashing here and there from the same general area. I brought a couple bulls in last year thrashing around in a tree trying to climb it to get a better view, started to leave the area and there were two bulls headed directly at the tree. The lead bull was legal.

    End of the season as long as the temps and weather are right to get the rut started you can call them in. Biggest key, patience....... I called a few bulls in right at the end of the season last year, it takes time.......

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  5. #5
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Call and glass more walk less.
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    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  6. #6
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    Default

    The best advice I can give, is what has always worked for me:

    Think like a moose.

    Where is the food? Where are the hunters? Where can I bed down? Where are the girl mooses?

  7. #7

    Default moose

    I like a late season still hunt on a spot with a bit of calling. Passed on this bull in 06 as our party downed one a couple days before and I was hoping for some wolf or bear action since we had meat. Pretty sure I could've called this one into the tent though, he was fired up.



    It helps if you are very familiar with the area and patience is usually the key.
    Last edited by whitepalm; 05-03-2008 at 21:25. Reason: more

  8. #8
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Is that debris on the right antler or is that a wicked drop tine? He would have been in my freezer thats for sure!

  9. #9

    Default its

    Drop tine, I wouldnt do it any different.

    We know the wolves are around in bigger numbers than before and I was trying to do something about it. If it is meant to be i'll see him again or perhaps the bull that scarred up this fellas forehead.
    Last edited by whitepalm; 05-03-2008 at 22:58. Reason: more

  10. #10
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    Default Highly Dependent

    It really depends on a lot of factors; there's not a single method preferred over another without some considerations...

    Weather, time of day, rut phase, location and calling are the main ones. Early in the season higher elevations usually produce better results and a spot/stalk with challenge grunts will at least improve your chances. Blazing sunshine and higher temps will tend to keep them bedded throughout the day with some movement; they'll stay close to water/mud holes to help curb insects and stay cooler. Post rain days will provide better opportunities for seeing them move around as they will be a little lazy with bedding down and trying to stay dry. Post rainy days are my favorite to hunt due to the quieted nature of footsteps making it a bit easier for spot/stalk.

    Mid season they will be coming down from higher grounds unless the temps and bears don't keep them high. The last few years we've had warming trends during the ruts and the area that I hunt has seen later arrivals of moose to the lower breeding grounds. Challenge grunts and cow calls are more effective as the rut progresses - avoid hunting where there's obvious bear sign, the moose know they are vulnerable and will avoid the bear smell /sounds.

    Late season will be your best bet for calling, cow calls, scraping, grunting; just about any sound a moose makes should produce something - answers or the presence of an ungulate...


    -This is all been my personal experience and in no way reflects or suggests how others should do it: it's just works for me and what I've observed. Hope it helps ya out.
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

  11. #11
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    Default

    A very experienced moose hunter/Fish and Wildlife officer once told me he would trade the entire rest of the season for the last three days.

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