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Thread: Reloading 45 acp help

  1. #1

    Default Reloading 45 acp help

    I am new to reloading and I purchased a used Dillon square deal progressive to reload 45 acp. Some of my questions and I hope you guys can answer are these, I am using Speer 45 TMJ SWC 185 grain .451" match bullets for reloading. My Lyman 48th edition has a listing for this type of bullet and calls for an overall length of 1.135" with a BC of .068. Now I think that is a little short. I picked up one of those small complete reloading manuals for the 45 ACP at sportsmans warehouse and for the same bullet it calls for an overall length of 1.275" with a BC of .090 (C.O.L. tested at) the Sectional density is the same at .130 for both So what gives. Are they both correct? It seems like a big difference to me. Also when setting up the last stage on my progressive, which is the stage which removes the bell and crimps the bullet, how much tolerance is one allowed. I see .4730 inches is what it is suppose to be but how much leeway does one have? Thanks and feel free to give any other advice you see fit to give.

  2. #2
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    Both Speer #12 and Midway LoadMap show col at 1.275" for this bullet.

    Some times I have to adjust the col just a bit (in or out) to get various bullets to feed right in my autos. Watch the pressure if you seat deeper.

    I use a single stage press and seat the bullet first then use another die (Lee Carbide Factory Crimp) to smooth out the bell and crimp.

  3. #3

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    A 45acp head spaces on the case mouth, so the crimp or lack of is important. My 1911 had jaming problems with anything but mil ball ammo. Had a smith trick it out, now shoots all my reloads no matter what bullets I reload. Polish the throat so bright it sparkels, and cut the ejector port deeper.
    Jim

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarsyn View Post
    I am new to reloading and I purchased a used Dillon square deal progressive to reload 45 acp. Some of my questions and I hope you guys can answer are these, I am using Speer 45 TMJ SWC 185 grain .451" match bullets for reloading. My Lyman 48th edition has a listing for this type of bullet and calls for an overall length of 1.135" with a BC of .068. Now I think that is a little short. I picked up one of those small complete reloading manuals for the 45 ACP at sportsmans warehouse and for the same bullet it calls for an overall length of 1.275" with a BC of .090 (C.O.L. tested at) the Sectional density is the same at .130 for both So what gives. Are they both correct? It seems like a big difference to me. Also when setting up the last stage on my progressive, which is the stage which removes the bell and crimps the bullet, how much tolerance is one allowed. I see .4730 inches is what it is suppose to be but how much leeway does one have? Thanks and feel free to give any other advice you see fit to give.
    I've loaded about one million rounds for the 45 ACP and I'm a little confused by your post.

    The BC (Ballistic Coeffecient) of a bullet has nothing to do with the seating depth of a bullet. Is that what your asking? Also any .451" bullet of 185 grains will have exactly the same SD (Sectional Density) of any other .451" bullet of 185 grains.

    Also the loading manual published by the company that made the bullet is the most reliable as to seating depth and the BC and SD of a bullet.

    Crimping of 45 ACP (or any auto loader pistol round) should be done with a taper crimp die, in a seperate operation, and I adjust for the crimp for the case mouth to measure .470" for jacketed bullets.

    I seat the Speer 185 and 200 grain TMC bullets to the same depth of 1.270" and they feed very well in every thing I own.

    Seating a bullet deeper will increase pressures slightly but in a normal load a few thousands one way or another won't be noticed. The 45 ACP operates at such a low pressure that high pressure signs don't show up on brass until it starts to bulge the unsupported portion of the case. Just stay in the loading manuals suggested load. Buy a couple of good bullet makers manuals, there are many good tips there as well as very well tested data.
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