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Thread: Noncombat fishing advice

  1. #1
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    Default Noncombat fishing advice

    The wife and I are coming to Alaska towards the end of July. We plan to spend a few days is Serward (chasing halibut and silvers) and then move up to Cooper's Landing. Could anyone recomend a spot not so busy. (shoreline) I brought her up last year and we fished bird creek in a combat situation. Good times, but I think the girl needs a little more room to work.

    Looks like the reds are running that time of year. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Default

    I can tell you where not to go, the Russian river confluence.
    If you do some walking in from the pull offs down stream on the Kenai you should be able to find some elbow room. Or hike up the Russian a ways it will be less crowded. You might even try some spots above the Russian on the Kenai the crowds should be thinner. The amount of reds will be less but still fishable.

  3. #3
    Member Stogey's Avatar
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    Default #1 Rule of Salmon Fishin

    Good points mentioned... walk around, get away from the folks, etc.

    Just remember the #1 Rule of Salmon Fishing in Alaska...
    If you find you are the only one fishing:
    A - There are no fish
    or
    B - You are in closed waters


    You should be pretty safe on the Kenai.
    Or, walking up the Russian... if you see a waterfall you might want to check the regs, and stop fishin.

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    Default Thanks

    Good info. Thank you.

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default yep...

    Get the book "Flyfishers Guide to Alaska" by Scott Haugen. It is available on the forum store in the fishing section. Best book I have bought in a long time. It does not matter if you fly fish or not. The book tells you where to go and has over 100 maps. The book is broke into sections. The Kenai Peninsula has its own chapter and there are tons of places to go and get away from the crowds. Buy this book and you will see what I mean. Off the top of my head, Lower Paradise Lake and Carter/Crater Lake are near Seward. You hike in a mile or two to the lakes. Great grayling fishing from what I read. Read about the Resurection River near Hope. Read about Quartz Creek. Lots of info in this book that will help you get away from the crowds.


    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/sto...products_id=75

    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/sto...products_id=94
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Default fishing for reds

    Even though there are a lot folks at the Russian/Kenai, remember a sockeye fisherman only needs about 10yds of space in order not to be crowded.

    Combat fishing also has its upside in regards to the social / comedy factor going on around you.

  7. #7
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK-TEX-OR View Post
    Even though there are a lot folks at the Russian/Kenai, remember a sockeye fisherman only needs about 10yds of space in order not to be crowded.

    Combat fishing also has its upside in regards to the social / comedy factor going on around you.
    You may even get a bonus trip to the clinic to remove a hook from your anatomy.

  8. #8
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    Default Seen that a few times

    I remember hanging out with Mark Wilson in Hamilton's Place one afternoon, when 2 young guys come walking into the store. One of the guys asks Mark - "How far to the nearest hospital?"

    Mark looked at 'em, and in his dry deadpan manner says, "Well, 50 miles that way to Seward, or 50 miles that way to Soldotna. Why what's the problem?"

    The other kid then walks forward and sticks out his thumb - it is completely skewered by a coho fly...straight through the middle, meaty part of his thumb.

    Both Mark and I said in unison..."Ewww....that's gotta hurt!".

    The kid starts to turn a bit red, then bursts out crying...."Yeah it does."

    About that time, the first guy takes hold of the kid and starts pulling him towards the door..."Guess we better get driving...50 miles, huh?"

    xxxxxx
    Bare with me, I have a second story.

    Down fishing at the Funny River campground with my buddy Rodney. It's his first ever day in Alaska, and we're slaying reds pretty good. An chatty old-timer is fishing next to us. He hooks up with a big old buck and it gives him quite a tussle. As he starts backing it into the bank his hook pops out. So the guy starts walking back out into his spot to start flipping again.

    Next thing we hear from this guy is "Oops."

    We look over and as the guy tries to flip his fly back into the water, it becomes apparent that his coho fly has embedded itself in the side of his right check. Needless to say, his latest attempt to cast his fly has probably only made a "sticky" situation worse.

    Everyone in line, stops casting for a moment, all eyes fixed on "Don" as he attempts to pop the fly out of the flesh of his face. After a few seconds of struggling, he gives up, and turns to the guy next to him - a big burly ex-cop from the lower 48, and asks the guy - "Hey, can you pull this fly out with your pliers?"

    The big ex-cop grabs his pliers and walks over to Don. He sticks his pliers up to Don's face and just as he's about to grab hold of the fly, he has second thoughts, "No, I don't think that would be a very good idea...it's in there pretty deep." Instead, he just cuts the leader off of the fly.

    With that Don walks over to the bank and sets his rod down in the grass. Then he makes an announcement, "Well, fellas...guess I'll be off to the hospital for awhile. See ya in two hours." With that, Don packs up his stuff and off he goes.

    The rest of us go back to fishing, and as you know with sockeye fishing, hours go by in what seems like minutes. Well, sure enough, about two hours later, we hear Don shouting from the top of the bank, "Hey, guys, I'm back." He comes plopping down into the water and then commences to tell us all about his adventure - "You'll never guess what they did at the hospital - before they took out my fly, they took my picture and put it up on the bulletin board. Did you know that I'm the 35th guy they've removed a fly from this year?"

    xxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Anyways, combat fishing can be fun, but I guess you gotta be careful as well. That kinda stuff is funny unless it happens to you or someone you know. I almost knocked out my two front teeth on Ship Creek one day, so I should know.

  9. #9
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default mmmm Don't fish?

    OK that isn't going to happen. You can rent a boat out of Whittier and go snag Reds, troll for silvers and if you are very lucky catch a butt! Look at our sponsor for this forum.

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  10. #10
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    Default

    On the russian I had my own hook go through my ear. I even had my coat hood up (it was raining) and it went through the coat, then my ear, and back out the coat. I did just what that old timer did. I tried to flip, and found out real fast I was hooked. Folks around me were giving advice and watching to see what I'd go. I just pulled it a little to make sure the barb was through and clipped it off, and took out the hook. Limited out an hour later.

    Funnys story but goes to show you that you'd better wear eye protection combat fishing or not. (It wasn't very crowded at the river that night so I had 10 feet to myself and still got hooked).

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