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Thread: salt alternative for hides

  1. #1

    Default salt alternative for hides

    Anyone know of a product for hide field care instead of #50 salt (spring bear for a week). I heard a rumor that Taylor sells something at the Wiggys store, but he's out playin' till May 6. Sounds like #5 would do a hide???

  2. #2
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    Default

    ITs called TTC. We pretty much beat it to death awhile ago but I can't find the thread. Yes, 5 pounds will do a bear hide. MArc sellls it in Anchorage and LArry Bartlett may know where to get it in Fairbanks.

  3. #3
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default TTC.... Again?

    Quote Originally Posted by gotAKfever View Post
    Anyone know of a product for hide field care instead of #50 salt (spring bear for a week). I heard a rumor that Taylor sells something at the Wiggys store, but he's out playin' till May 6. Sounds like #5 would do a hide???
    AK,

    There have been several discussions on this website concerning the product you are referring to. HERE IS A LINK to a search I just did, that should provide you with the information you need. In a nutshell, yes, the stuff is light-weight. BUT most or all of the taxidermists who weighed in on the discussion don't like it, for various reasons. It seems that it dries the hide out to jerky-like consistency, making it very difficult to work with.

    In my opinion (so far) you would be better off using salt. The only disagreement on this point seems to be coming from Mr. Taylor (who is selling TTC) and a handful of folks with varying degrees of experience. No disrespect to anyone intended here, including any experienced folks I may have overlooked, I'm just summarizing what folks have been saying.

    Talk to your taxidermist about it before you decide. It would be a really bad idea to just use it anyway because the weight reduction works for you.

    Best of luck.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Default Mike...

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    AK,

    There have been several discussions on this website concerning the product you are referring to. HERE IS A LINK to a search I just did, that should provide you with the information you need. In a nutshell, yes, the stuff is light-weight. BUT most or all of the taxidermists who weighed in on the discussion don't like it, for various reasons. It seems that it dries the hide out to jerky-like consistency, making it very difficult to work with.

    In my opinion (so far) you would be better off using salt. The only disagreement on this point seems to be coming from Mr. Taylor (who is selling TTC) and a handful of folks with varying degrees of experience. No disrespect to anyone intended here, including any experienced folks I may have overlooked, I'm just summarizing what folks have been saying.

    Talk to your taxidermist about it before you decide. It would be a really bad idea to just use it anyway because the weight reduction works for you.

    Best of luck.

    -Mike
    Your link didn't show up as a link...
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    Speaking of limited experience, have you ever used it Mike?

    Talking to the taxidermist is a great idea but most here do not seem to have much experience with it. It saves weight and really sucks the moisture out of the hide. It seems to work very well.

  6. #6

    Default Well

    I've phoned and talked to people at McKenzie, Jonas Bros., Flagg Group, and some individual shop owners. Most have little or no experience with it, however the ones that do, don't recommend it over salt.
    They say the hides they've done are too dry almost brittle at thin spots like lips and ears.
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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Total Throphy Care

    I have used this on a couple of animals. They all turned out fine, no hair slippage. It will dry out the hide, but that is what you want. I will say you should flesh it good first. This will solve most issues, the hide has to be rehydrated to mount anyway. I use it on fly-ins were space and weight are an issue. If you have the room take salt as it is much cheaper, but if space and weight are an issue take the TTC. If you are going to an established drop off, there might be salt there already. Most drop camps I have been into had salt, fuel and other stuff hunters have left. I feel that it is a good product. Here are some photos of my sheep that was done with TTC, took me 8 days to get him back and it rained everyday.


    Steve

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default question for your taxidermist

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    ...I feel that it is a good product....
    Hello Steve,

    Who was your taxidermist, and how did he feel about TTC? Would he be interested in posting his observations here?

    I realize that some hunters prefer it over salt; this is understandable considering the weight savings. But for me the real issue is not just what works for me as a hunter. It's about whether I'm giving my taxidermist fits. If you could get yours to post here, it would really help.

    Thanks, Steve!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
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    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
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  9. #9
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill S. View Post
    Speaking of limited experience, have you ever used it Mike?

    Talking to the taxidermist is a great idea but most here do not seem to have much experience with it. It saves weight and really sucks the moisture out of the hide. It seems to work very well.
    Hello Bill,

    I would never trust my clients' capes to a product I cannot vouch for without hesitation. For that reason I have not used TTC. There are probably some folks out there that believe you should actually use something before venturing an opinion on it; I disagree very strongly. Do I have to actually use a Wal-Mart sleeping bag before I can suggest a better quality product? Of course not. I'm sure this is not your view, but I have encountered that perspective here before. Quite frankly it really doesn't make a lot of sense (otherwise why would we ever ask anyone about products we have not personally used).

    Rather than field testing it on my clients' animals, I decided to query taxidermists who have seen it used on capes and hides, and get their professional opinion. These guys make their living handling hides and capes, and are, in my opinion, in the best position to evaluate it. So far, there has been little or no support for this from the folks who have written in here. Admittedly we have only had a handful of taxidermists respond to this question, but so far the responses have been negative.

    On the other hand, it is true that some hunters like the weight savings (who wouldn't?) But the overall consensus from the taxidermists who have written in on it, coupled with the testimony of Russell Knight (owner of Knight's Taxidermy in Anchorage) is a "thumbs down" on the product. I got that information directly from Russell at the SCI convention a few weeks ago.

    Hopefully more taxidermists will write in on this; I'm very interested in what they have to say about it. For my part, I won't use it or recommend it until I have something more substantial to go on than recommendations from hunters of various experience levels.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  10. #10

    Default

    I am going to chim in on this again.... You all leave out the most important part to the new guys that have never used it before, YOU need to completely flesh the hide, turn the ears,eyes, lips and nose completely if you are insisting on using this product, make sure you get the epidermis layer off before you use it. and fold it hair to hair before it dries.

    It doesn't matter if your using salt or TTC if your not going to take care of the hide and properly flesh it the right way then anything you use wont work the way it was ment to.

    I'm not going to beat a dead horse but i think you all know where i stand with this. If any one is in fairbanks, stop in the shop and i will show you what i mean.

    I prefer salt.

  11. #11
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default

    Mike, Rich Hamilton is my taxidermist. I agree 100% that you really need to flesh the hide as Harters said. I mean fleshed and ready for the tanner. Okay now to where to shines. If I go on a sheep hunt with a 50 lb limit, I don't want to take 25 lbs of salt. But without it either, after several weather days I have no cape to be stiff. With out it I would have a Euro mount sheep not the wonderful mount I have now. I prefer salt as well, but TTC sure works better than hoping the plane can get you back before your hair slips. With warm sheep hunting weather even more important. Now for a spring hunt with cool temps and snow around you may get by without salting for a few days, others can speak on this better than I. Another thing TTC does is draw the water out like crazy. I would say that if you were having to pack it a long way, it would greatly reduce the weight overnight. Rich told me that he too prefers salt for the same reasons already stated. If you are doing remote hunts here one must really bone up on taxidermy to have a great mount. The face is key and that is the area most fail to turn and flesh properly. The field taxidermy DVDs sold on this site are a great start.

    Happy Hunting all

    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Here are some photos of my sheep that was done with TTC, took me 8 days to get him back and it rained everyday.
    Steve,

    Nice looking ram. Your tripod set up with the dowel rods is interesting. Did you fly those in and stash them at the strip? Useful if you have to wait at the strip for a while.

  13. #13
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Tripod, that is what we did. It saved us because we got weathered in. We hung 2 sheep on that rig and the entire thing was less than 10 lbs. The top in made of aluminum and the legs were made from closet curtain rods from HD. Could have done the same thing with just the poles and tied them together at the top. Let us get the meat off the ground and any from the bugs and small critters. No match for a bear. Let the meat get good air. Only had the tarp for rain protection, took it off when ever possible. That trip made me want to learn taxidermy, I failed to turn the ears right and all most messed up the cape. I was not prepared for the task before I went into the field. Will not make that mistake again.

    Steve

    Steve

  14. #14

    Default thanks all

    Sorry I didn't do a search to start with, (cranialflatulation). Are we talking about so much moisture loss that I could "lose" true dimensions of a hide? Has the product actually ruined an animal, or just less preferred by the taxidermists? Still plan to stop by Knight's before we go, so I'll maybe get lucky enough to see first hand. For know, maybe we'll cut back to 500 rounds of ammo, instead of the 1k we planned. Thanks again all, and sorry for kicking the smelly pony.

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    My 2 cents We used it last year on 1 grizzly and 3 bous did all of the required fleashing and used about 9 lbs total. Took the hides to a taxidermist (by the railroad tracks) in Fairbanks and he was impressed with how it worked but said he was going to grind it up so it would be finer power and not like rock salt, all of our hides turned out great. TTC has a place in my pack string from now on here in Idaho

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