Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Traveling with a Lab

  1. #1

    Default Traveling with a Lab

    I have a year old male Lab, how safe is airline travel? Is it safer to leave him with a dog motel for a week and a half or bring him on the plane? Which is more harmful to the dog? Thanks.

  2. #2
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kink Alaska surrounded by sled dog kennels, a fabulous view and lots of hunting.
    Posts
    383

    Default Traveling with Labs

    I travel a lot with my dogs, 2 are labs. First you'll save a lot of anxioty crate training him. If he already will "crate" you're almost there. Motels usually do not want the dog left in the room if you are not there, even with a crate. Know the dog will worry. If you think you can spend a lot of time with him on the trip try it.

    For the airlines check ahead and where your going. Check with them to get your instructions. Different airlines have different rules. If you can send him "counter to counter" do it. Cargo to Cargo can be a hassle leaving the dog out on the tarmack, or running around in delivery carts for hours. (been there and went crazy with the clerk after 2 hours)

    How does he take new places? If he's not used to going with you everywhere it could be a lot to take in for him. Try not to change his food. You'll have to carry dog food, water, leashes,a bowl, a dog bed or blanket (something he can lay on, you dont know whats on those motel floors). I took mine on business trips - take a lint brush. Dogs shed like crazy under stress and especially this time of year.

    If you can't spend time with him on the trip, will have to leave him alone a lot, the doggy camp may be a better bet for both of you. Only you know.

    Linda Henning
    www.alaskadognews.com

  3. #3

    Default

    Heat in Texas made me fly my lab out of Houston the evening before I was flying. The airline set up a stay in Seattle for the dog and was to put him on plane the next day to meet my Anch. flight.
    The Keeper never showed at the Seattle airport and a kind lady with the airline took my lab home with her for the night. (All this with out me knowing about it).
    The next day as I am boarding in Houston, I call Seattle Keeper to check on my dog. They do not know anything about my dog and did not know they were to pick up at airport.
    All came out ok, but I sure leaned not to trust airlines to make such travel arrangements. That was 9 years ago and am sure things have changed.

    I drove 5k miles round trip in 06, just me and my lab. Did not want her flying, plus I was carrying extra gear.

  4. #4

    Default

    I am traveling from the lower 48 to Anchorage. If he can't go fishing or bear hunting with me he'll stay with my parents (they love him, he loves their cats). I guess I'm wondering what is more stressful for the dog, a week and a half at a Dog Kennel or a round trip on an airplane? With the airlines you have a lot of stress, but it's hours long instead of a week long around other dogs and their diseases?

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kink Alaska surrounded by sled dog kennels, a fabulous view and lots of hunting.
    Posts
    383

    Default Best kennel in SC Alaska

    Our labs stay at Wetland Retrievers www.wetlandretrievers.net and they hardly want to come home. If we can ever get away again.

    It's an open kennel concept so if you dog is sociable with other dogs and you live near Palmer that is the best place. The airline thing with a dog is too much stress for me.

    Linda Henning
    www.alaskadognews.com

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    324

    Default

    I flew my year old lab back to Arkansas with me in December for some duck hunting and she handled flying very well. As far as taking care of the dog during flight Continental did a good job. The only problem I ran into was on the way back to Anchorage from Tulsa. When I talked to the airline company to find out what kind of health certificates I would need for her before I left they told me she would be good as long as she was checked out with in 30 days of flying. On the way back here from Tulsa they would let her on the plane because her certificate was not within 10 days. I ended up having to leave her with family for a week so they could take her to a vet and get her a new health certificate. I checked online when I got home and all airlines that I could find require one with in 10 days of travel. I also like the way continental took care of her on the flight. They gave her water at every stop and if she was to be in her kennel for 8 hours they take your dog out to let her go to the bathroom as well.

  7. #7
    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Maryland...not by choice
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    I just got back from Oregon a couple of days ago and flew my lab with me, all they required was a health certificate, and a kennel that the dog can stand up and turn around in. They also require two dishes in the kennel for food and water. That was it, I paid an extra 100 dollars for the extra baggage, and did not have any problems. They came on board before we took off with a card letting me know my dog was safely on board. When we landed my dog did not seem to have any problems, just his normal hyper self.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kink Alaska surrounded by sled dog kennels, a fabulous view and lots of hunting.
    Posts
    383

    Default Flying with your dog

    Who did you fly with? Sounds like they did an outstanding job.
    Linda Henning
    www.alaskadognews.com

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    76

    Default My experiences

    I have flown my Lab from Fairbanks to the lower 48 twice, for some bird hunting--both times with Alaska Airlines all the way. Like as been mentioned before, check the web for the airlines requirements. Alaska requires a health certificate, large kennel, and the two food/water containers permanently attached inside.

    I went to great pains, and some extra expense, to find the most direct flights, to cut down on the number of transfers. If you transfer from one airline to another, then each airline charges extra for the dog.

    I made a copy of my itinerary and all my phone numbers, and put it in plastic and taped that to the top of the kennel, with the dogs name in large letters.

    Alaska Airlines has a system of small "tear off stickies"--one for each transfer point. They have the owners seat number printed on each one. Each time the dog is transferred to another airplane, the cargo handeler is required to tear off the one for that transfer and take it up and personally hand it to the lead Flight Attendant, who then walks it back and hands it to the owner, letting you know that your dog is onboard.

    My lab is not one of those layed back, low keyed labs, but my experience has been that it appeared to be more stressful for me than for the dog!

    Good luck.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    424

    Default

    Where are you all actually flying to and what is the flying time. I am looking at maybe brinnging along my Lab with me back to Pennsylvania but that trip is hard enough on me and could only imagine what the dog would go through. Thanks

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    76

    Default My Trips

    One trip was from Fairbanks to Billings Montana, and return 4 days later. It was a night, direct flight to Seattle, then a transfer to Horizon Air, direct to Billings. It was a total of about 8 hours "in the box".

    The other trip that I took my lab on was Fairbanks direct to Seattle again, an aircraft transfer, and then a direct flight to Sacramento, California. Once again it was about 8 hours-9 hours. This one was more nerve racking for me however, as when I arrived in Seattle it was dark, and pouring down rain. I had about a two hour layover there and I knew that the dog was in a baggage cart sitting in the rain somewhere (or worse).

    Anyway, as mentioned below all went well, and we had a great time hunting. As mentioned below however, it will go much better if you dog has been "crate trained" from the get go, and feels at home, and comfortable in the crate.

  12. #12

    Default

    He's crate trained, he spends time in there daily while I'm at work. He goes right in with the command "kennel". Honestly, I think flying will be more stressful for me than for him.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •