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Thread: Converting outboards from props to jets and back

  1. #1
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    Default Converting outboards from props to jets and back

    I did not want to get off track with another thread so I started this topic again. There is always a good deal of debate concerning that a outboard jet mounted on a jack plate which is set back off the transom loses efficency.
    Seems there are two schools of thought on this. The guys who have done it and like it, and the people who say it isnt a good idea but who may not have tried it.

    I never owned a outboard jet mounted on a jackplate but I plan to next year.

    How many of you folks personally owned or have owned a outboard jet on a jackplate and what is your opinion of it?Did you have to so anything special to get the jet to perform correctly? If you lost any efficiency, how much did you lose?
    Tennessee

  2. #2
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    So you read my other post about my Wooldrige etc. I really believe that a setback and lift are ok BUT it depends greatly on who is doing it. Wooldridge knows their stuff for certain. Mine worked perfectly. Thats my 2 cents for what its worth.

  3. #3
    Member alaskanmoosehunter's Avatar
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    To each his own, but my friends SeaArk had one on it from when he bought the boat. The boat only had 80 hours on the motor and hull(150HP Honda) That was the first thing to go! Because the motor set back further from the transom it had a LOT of leverage on it. That increased as the boat was trailered and being towed with the motor bouncing from our great Alaska roads. The transom began to show stress cracks fom the extra leverage.


    Also another thing to think about is possible cavatation. As your moving the hull travels over the water and the water is smooth. The water becomes more turbulant (air mixed with water) the further it seperates from the bottom of the hull. By putting the foot as close to the boat as you can it doesn't allow the water to get turbulant thus sucking in pure water with no air. It doesn't take far for this to happen. Hope I wrote this so it made sense.

    Just something to think about.
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  4. #4
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    A Transom Saver will help with the stress on the transom...
    A short piece of UHMW or something like it extending back from the bottom of the transom will take care of any turbulent water.
    "When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it."
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  5. #5
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    As riverboater said a transom saver and a piece of UHMW to extend the tunnel. I also have a Honda 150 HP and IMHO it is much better suited to be run with a prop. Mine is acts like a different engine when I run the prop. I feel that it stays in the power band better. I'm sure it was made to run a prop. The mod is not for everyone, but it sure has worked out for me


    Steve

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