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Thread: Bivy Sack for Sheep Hunting ?

  1. #1
    Member RidgeRunner76's Avatar
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    Default Bivy Sack for Sheep Hunting ?

    Was lucky enough to draw ds102 TMA !! And have most of my gear assembled and purchased but am looking for some heads up on what bivy sack to consider. Preferable on the less expensive side of this as I am a bit over budget already!! Looking for lightweight and totally waterproof... obviously(rather be wet from inside than outside I guess. I have no experience with bivy sacks but need have to the ability to sack out nearly anywhere!!.

  2. #2
    New member AKDSLDOG's Avatar
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    Default

    Most people don't like the extra weight on a sheep/goat hunt, but I personally carry my bivy with me on all my hunts. I think it weighs in at 1.2 lbs is all gortex, double zippers on both sides (you can wear it like a parka and still use both arms outside), double chest/face liner (mosquito net and or gortex cover). I think I paid $285.00 for it 10 years ago. The 3 things I do not skimp on when hunting (especially alone) are.

    1.Tent
    2. Sleeping bag
    3. Bivy sack

    Weather kills, period. I carry the bivy when away from camp. It's not much alone but it could save your life or perhaps your hunting partner gets hurt and you have to go for help, sure would be nice to put him/her in a bivy, may just save his/hers/your life.

    The only thing I didn't get on mine (and wish I had) was D-rings to stake it down if need be. You might not be on a flat place to sleep and rolling off the mountain side is, er, ummmm probably not to fun.

    P.S. Congrats on the TMA, Great hunt. Was my first sheep hunt and did it solo, had a great time and bagged my first ram.

  3. #3

    Default Intended Use???

    What is your intended use of this bivy? A primary shelter or a shelter incase you gotta stay away from your tent for a night??

  4. #4
    Member RidgeRunner76's Avatar
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    Default

    Just to keep options open.... If I See "the Ram" a little later that I would want to and make a stalk a little later than I should.... It would be nice to have the option.

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    Default

    For a simplistic, ultralight bivy you may want to consider the Ptarmigan (aptly named) by Titanium Goat: http://www.titaniumgoat.com/Bivy.html It would not be my first choice as a primary shelter, but it would keep the dew/frost off and add a bit of warmth to your bag. It is popular with the lightweight crowd for use with tarps.

    I own the model that preceded the Ptarmigan (unfortunately a bright yellow color), but haven't used it operationally yet.

    Just an idea.

  6. #6

    Default Bivy

    Depending on your intended use and budget, a military surplus goretex bivy can be had for pretty cheap on Ebay. Alittle on the bulky, heavy side to carry in addition to a tent but built like a brick, well you know.

  7. #7

    Default

    If you have no experience with bivies, you might want to find someone who has one and try it out first. They're a tight fit compared to a tent, and hard to change clothes in when it's raining out. When I'm alone I use one in lieu of a tent, and it's worth it to spend money on a good one if that's what you want it for. The nicer models are have goretex or some other breatheable layer, and they're able to give you ventilation even if it's rainy & windy out. Bivies can make you suffocate if you close them up all they way when it rains.

    If you plan on actually spending the occasional night in one, see if you can at least find one that has a hoop over the head; I find it drives me nuts to have the fabric sitting on my face, otherwise.

    My current bivy is an Outdoor Research Alpine, but I have my eyes on the ones made by Integral Designs. I think they're the company that makes bivies for the military.
    Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

  8. #8

    Default +1 ptarmagin by Titanium goat

    I picked up a ptarmagin this winter and used it with my sil tarp a month or so ago on a Skilak/Kenai drag and float. Only weighs three ounces but I feel would do the trick for a night away from base camp, might not hold back a down pour but will definatly add a few degrees to you bag and overall a pretty comfy setup

    Only clothes im changing on a sheep hunt are silkweight boxers a couple times...maybe and socks several times.

  9. #9
    Member RidgeRunner76's Avatar
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    Default Found the One 4 me

    While in Seattle for the weekend I found the bivy sack for me! It was even on sale at REI for $50 off. It is the Outdoor Research Alpine. Its weight is 2lbs and should do the trick. Anyone have one of these ??

    http://www.outdoorresearch.com/site/...66.223.182.215

  10. #10

    Default

    I have the REI Minimalist. I used it with my Moonstone bag (rated 20 degrees) and stay comfy in 15 to 20 degrees. I stayed warm, but had frost on the inside from all the condensation. I definitely wouldn't use one with a down bag...make sure it's synthetic.

    The only thing that sucks about the Minimalist is there is just mesh over your face. It doesn't totally enclose your head like some others. Some people pitch a tarp over themselves, but I just pitch my raincoat (Marmot Precip) over my head.

    I did see that OR Alpine at REI...I had to restrain myself. I'm a gear whore!

  11. #11
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    Default here's a lightweight option

    http://thegearjunkie.com/adventure-m...atsheets-bivvy

    if all you plan on is using it for a "just in case" this will probably work great with your sleeping bag inside. Lightweight and pretty strong for a few uses.

  12. #12

    Default Another Option

    Pick up a Sil-Light tarp. It is super lightweight, impregnated with silicone. Multiple uses...mainly, I use it as an extra rain cover to cover pack, etc when in my bivy to protect my gear.

    I have a TNF bivy. Not sure if you can get them anymore....but it has a tiny pole that lifts the head area off ones face....so there is some room in the shoulder/head area. Also, mesh window and d-rings to be staked out. Similar to the Bibler bivy. Definitely look into the sil-light tarp though....

  13. #13
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    Default OR Advanced

    I picked up a OR Advanced Bivy that, while expensive, is absolutely great. I have spent nights (14hrs long in Dec.) on shelves carved from snow while waking up every couple of hours to knock the snow off that was accumulating. I have also spent time in it during absolute deluges. I have never been anything but happy.

    It is big enough to read in and breathes very well. The hooped design is great; sleeping with clammy fabric on my face does not sound like any fun.

    For added covered area get one of the sly-nyl tarps (OR makes a couple and so do a few other makers) and use treking poles or sticks to erect it over the head of the bivy.

  14. #14

    Default Nope, not here.

    Spent way too many nights in a bivy. They are not what they are said to be. Try changing clothes, cooking, eating, peeing (use a garden hose) dry clothes (they do not transfer vapor well, do not use GoreTex), resting in a bivy in Aug / Sept rain or snow. If you find that sheep and want to stay on the hill, sleep in your pack as a bivy in conjunction with weatherproof jacket.

    My best recommendation is Inregral Design SilShelter. Around 12-14 ounces, will fit two, three if good friends, four if a must. Can hang it from a tree or use a ski pole or just wrap it around you if the weather is an Alaskan blow. The best superlight shelter out there. Plus, it can be used a glassing pad in the wet and around base camp for many things.

    Good luck

  15. #15
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    Default Breathable is better

    A breathable shelter is a must! I have spent too many miserable rain free nights in a raining tent. Too many people mistake the condensation that eventually builds up in breathable shells for leakage. Gore-Tex type materials today are great. I have hiked and lived in just about any water resistant material at one time or another and and most of these materials are great but they all have their limitations. PVC and fully waterproof materials work well if you are not working too hard.

    One example, I went to bed absolutely soaked in a driving rain. My bivy was so "foggy" inside that I could not see to read my book. I slept a warm, comfortable, 9 hours and woke up much drier then when I went to bed.

    Don't try and change clothes in one though.

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