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Thread: ibep shoot

  1. #1
    Member TeXXaN's Avatar
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    Default ibep shoot

    First off i am not bashing any instructors out there but when you have some one go through the shoot and get a spine shot even through its not in the vitals it is still going to smoke that animal correct. My questions is do you count it as a kill or not.

  2. #2
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default No

    No it would not count. Sure that shot could possibly kill an animal. But it is not the best ethical shot. The ideal shot location would be a double lung in the vitals. If you are aiming for the vitals, and you hit the spine at only 20 +/- yards, it was probably not your best shot.

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  3. #3
    Member TeXXaN's Avatar
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    Default Nervous

    I was about as nervous as i get first i used the wrong pin at 20 kneeling and then i jump the release on the 28 yard quartering away shot. I know it is not my best at all i should of smoke that mule deer. i have another shoot here soon so i will become ibep certified here in the next week i smoked all of the other animals with every arrow i shot.

  4. #4
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Range finder

    Up here, you can use a range finder. If allowed down there, maybe it will at least calm you down and give you enough at-ease to be successful. Good luck.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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  5. #5
    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
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    Default

    I Agree with Dave, If your nervous there what will happen on a real animal? They don,t stand still! The point is stay Calm. Easier said then done. Deep breaths, What color pin or yrds, Pick a spot, Aim, shoot All the rest will fall into place if you have practiced enough. Form is everything, That what you practice! At the range or hunting ,pick a spot & Aiming All should be thinking, Believe in yourself, And just shoot the best shot you can! They will be in there. Good luck next Wk, You can do it! Did I say PICK A SPOT!

  6. #6
    Member TeXXaN's Avatar
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    Default you said it

    We all get buck fever and it being the last station and having hit all other targets i just did it to my self. Nerve racking!!! My point is if i did do that on a real animal i would not have to track him.

  7. #7

    Default just my thoughts

    Texxan,

    You need to understand why this class has come about, mainly to stop negative press about bowhunters and give them an understanding of where bowhunting has come from and what we need to do to keep its future, yes you are correct, if you spined an animal it would go down. You need to practice more, and you probably won't be as nervous, don't think about if or how you will qualify, just one shot at a time.

    Good Luck

  8. #8
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    Default quality shots

    I think the point with these tests is to make sure you can hit where you aim, not whether the arrow might kill the animal or not. Using the "kill shot" argument, instructors would have to start counting shots that would have hit the femoral artery in the back leg as kill shots! The whole point is to make sure that, a majority of the time, a bowhunter can hit what they aim at. And there's even room built in for one or two bad shots, even at that limited yardage. If you only miss once and smoke the animal with all your other shots you will pass, guaranteed!

    I think it also helps to make folks practice. I've seen countless people at various ranges who are practicing because of an upcoming bow ed certification, and I sometimes wonder if that many would be practicing if there was only a written test.

    And finally, I think it's an eye opener on how easy it can be to miss/wound. Personally I don't feel I should be shooting an animal at a given yardage unless I can put 9 out of ten arrows into the kill zone at that yardage during practice. The way it stands in the IBEP cert you could miss with 3 out of eight arrows and still pass, which would imply an almost 40% wounding/miss rate on large animals at between 15 and 30 yards. That seems pretty generous (too generous?) to me! As an istructor it's my hope that most who do pass continue to practice and will hold themselves to an even higher standard.

    That's why I always encourage people to show up to the local 3D shoots. Not because I think everyone needs to be a competive shooter, or even because it's great practice and lots of fun. Mostly, it can be "educational" to see how easy it is to miss the kill zone and wound an animal! Even the best shooters shoot the occasional 5 or zero, and average shooters shoot quite a few of them. Basically, even more/better than the IBEP certification, it's a reality check. I think that this is why often the most experienced archers will often pass on shots that beginners don't think twice about.

  9. #9
    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Default Know your arrows

    The advice I have is to know your arrows before you go. I practiced quite a bit before the shoot and got to where I could hit pretty solid out to 40 yards - and was dead on at 20-30. First shot - way back on the animal. Doh!!! Second shot on first animal was perfect.

    Went to do my first shot on the second animal - way back on the animal. Second shot was perfect. Now I was kind of nervous because I knew I had to hit every single shot the rest of the way. But I realized both shots that I missed were with the same arrow. So I scrapped it and pulled a different one. Perfect the rest of the way out. When I got home that night I shot that arrow over and over, and it always pulled the same way. Turns out I had a bent arrow (aluminum). I either bent it just before the shoot or simply missed it in practice or didn't pay close enough attention. Either way, not having that arrow would have made the shoot a lot more relaxing. More importantly though, it taught me to consciously know my arrows, every single one of them, before I head to the field.

    Good luck.

  10. #10
    Member TeXXaN's Avatar
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    Default I got'er did

    I passed this time around!!! See you in the woods

  11. #11
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Congratulations!

    Congrats! Makes ya feel good to do it.

    I was just out practicing myself for a hunt in August. Can't wait to go but I need to be able to shoot at +/- 60 degrees on the hills yet and be able to connect every time.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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  12. #12
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    I need to be able to shoot at +/- 60 degrees on the hills yet and be able to connect every time.
    60 degree hills, eh? Are you adding some sheep into your annual Haul Road pilgrimmage?

    I need to practice those steep shots as well for my October archery sheep hunt.

  13. #13
    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    60 degree hills, eh? Are you adding some sheep into your annual Haul Road pilgrimmage?

    I need to practice those steep shots as well for my October archery sheep hunt.
    Have you got a spot to practice those Brian? I remember gearing up for my IBEP shoot and I hadn't shot from a stand in years. I took a couple practice shots from my roof, but didn't care too much for that. Rabbit Creek has a decent stand to shoot from but there isn't a lot of distance there.

    I thought at the IBEP test that would be where I would fail since it had been so long. Someone went ahead of me and hit dead center of the vitals. I was very nervous following that perfect shot. But then . . . accidentally took off one of his fletchings because my arrow was so close on his. Both of mine hit the vitals.

    Those shots definitely take some practice though.

  14. #14
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Who me?

    Now would I do that at my age? I don't put my weight on this treadmill every night for nothing.

    IF, the snow ever leaves Thompson Pass I plan on taking two targets up there. Shoot up, retrieve, shoot down. Shoot up, retrieve, shoot down. Shoot up, retrieve, shoot down.

    I bought some paper Stone sheep targets from http://www.turkeyhuntingsecrets.com/...%20BearCaribou

    I also have a 2' x 2' x 4' styrofoam dock float that may be the body or back stop.

    If you ever stop dreaming, you might as well be dead.....

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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  15. #15
    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post

    IF, the snow ever leaves Thompson Pass I plan on taking two targets up there. Shoot up, retrieve, shoot down. Shoot up, retrieve, shoot down. Shoot up, retrieve, shoot down.
    And if your hill shooting ain't quite up to par yet, you'll get some great practice at climbing up and down mountains, past the targets, to retrieve your arrows.

  16. #16
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Carbon

    Carbon + Rocks = trash bags to retrieve arrows.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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  17. #17
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    jmg- I can practice those shots in either my brother's or parent's yards. Getting more than 40 yards at those angles will be tough, but that's a start. Personally, I'm planning to have a sheep stand broadside at a level angle at...oh...about 15 yards or so. If the sheep don't get the message, though, I'd better be ready.

  18. #18
    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Personally, I'm planning to have a sheep stand broadside at a level angle at...oh...about 15 yards or so.
    Ohhhhh, ok . . . well if that's the plan, no worries then. Why don't you just go the extra step to make it really easy and invite the sheep over to your house for dinner? Then you don't have to worry about angle shots, climbing so high, wet weather, and all that other nonsense. I'm sure he'll come.


    Good luck with that.

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