Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Tundra II turning problem.

  1. #1
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Beaver Creek
    Posts
    2,267

    Default Tundra II turning problem.

    I just picked up a 97 Tundra II. My question is: How do you turn the machine? I tried leaning toward the inside, outside, putting my weight forward etc.... That big track just keeps wanting to go straight.

    I had to tighten the rear suspension to the third notch for my weight. Is it possible that the front suspension needs to be charged to get the skiis down? Maybe I need to get some carbides on the skiis?

    Thanks,
    Mike

  2. #2
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    If you dont have any skags/carbide/wearbars/whatever you wanna call them, then yes, the machine wont turn very well. You need something on the bottom of your ski to dig in and force the sled the way you want....I'd check there first. If you're talking about turning in deep powder, then thats another story...

  3. #3
    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    ANCHORAGE
    Posts
    774

    Default

    If it got plastic ski skins on it They won,t turn to good at there best. Also If that machine has a limter strap underneath towards the front inside the track, Try the ajustments there ,I think you want to go tighter to get the weight to the skies, Do one at a time until you get its best ride

  4. #4
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Adjusting ski pressure with your limiter straps and whatnot seems kind of like a far fetched problem when talking about a tundra. If you were running winding/bumpy trails very hard on a high horsepower sled, then I would say, yeah, adjust your limiter straps to what you like, but as far as this goes, it sounds like the machine just doesn't turn at all...just my

  5. #5
    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    803

    Default

    SusitnaAK is on the right track with the limiter strap. Actually, it may not have one anymore, since they tend to rot and break about every 6-10 years. That could be the problem.

    HOWEVER, you also need to have the right expectations. Tundra II's don't turn great at the best of times. They are very light in the front by design.

    Yk

  6. #6
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Adjusting your limiter straps just changes your weight transfer when on the throttle. When just driving at a constant speed, it shouldn't change your steering that much...Guess we need to know if dirtofak has carbide on his skiis first...

  7. #7
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    On hard packed trails or ice, about the only thing you can do is plan ahead for turns and get off and pull the skis around when you dont quite make it. Mostly it takes a bit of skill and foresight to run the tundra versus other machines. Look for bumps and humps ahead that you can use to redirect the skis where you want to go. I think the plastic ski covers are the culprit. they just skim across the surface without biting in. They turn fine with a bit of snow under them for the ski's to grab. After driving a tundra for a few years I was amazed at how easy it was to turn my new bravo. I still grab the tundra over the bravo almost any chance I get, that tundra just gets me everywhere I need to go under almost any conditions. I've thought about putting skegs of some type on to help turning but havent actually done anything other than just get used to how it steers. I'd be interested in hearing what you do and how it works.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Shortening the limiter straps sucks the front of the skid up and places more weight on the skis. It will turn better on hard snow but you'll sacrifice some deep snow performance. Ski skins help considerably in deep snow and don't hurt on hard pack as long as you use some carbide wear bars. Every new sled I've ever bought has required adjustment to the set-up to suit my needs. Don't be afraid to experiment to find what suits you. That's why they have adjustment capability. On the other hand, don't expect a Tundra to challenge an MX-Z in the twisties.

  9. #9
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Squarebanks
    Posts
    661

    Default turning the Tundra

    I use skins on mine and yeah it takes away from the turning. This is what I did and it works pretty well...

    I went and bought a new pair of stock skegs and took my welder and added a layer of hardface to them. It seems to help quite a bit and I think the skegs will last a lot longer. I cant take credit of this idea in think JiminDelta told me that trick a while back.

  10. #10
    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    ANCHORAGE
    Posts
    774

    Default

    If you want the best of the best They make aftermarket wide skis, that are composate?/plastic. Simmons Flexi-ski come to mind,There are others, Get a set of those around the same width with dual carbides, Bring the limter strap up one from the factory setting, start from there.These are not cheap! but you feel like your driving a different machine. All the new higher end machines come from the factory with this style ski, Mr, Pid on the money About the weight transfer trail or powder,Thats what the limiter strap is for, Light steering or heavy, go to much there will be no more gain and it will wear you out before you get there. He spends a lot of time on this type machine ,As do I. I like little heavy on the front,because these skies are shaped on the bottem like a rocking chair, They don,t sit flat on the ground also they are cupped for floatation, and get rid of a few Lbs metal on the front. Man i sound like a commercial! The skins where king in there day, But my machine used to dart all over, I was going to sell it because got so bad fighting it. Also the cheaper Rt, Like byrd said, if have a welder to add more to the stock skag We used to just use round stock, tack on top, then sharpen it with a peanut grinder. It did work good! Til it wears down than back to same problem. Let us know what you come up with, Thats how we all learn ,to share our ideas,
    Last edited by SusitnaAk; 04-29-2008 at 19:25. Reason: spelling

  11. #11
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Beaver Creek
    Posts
    2,267

    Default

    My thanks for all the replies. Sorry to not get back, but I have a big weekend to plan and execute. My skiis are the stock ones with the 3/8 (or so) bar running under it.

    While crawling all over the machine tonight, I found a cracked weld on the front spring loaded arm. The left side arm going to the bottom rail was really doing nothing, leaving all the load to the right side. I decided to try a temp fix as I am only going about 12 miles total on flat ice. A little weld here and a brace there. Shadetree stuff.

    Thanks again!
    Mike

  12. #12
    bullshop junior
    Guest

    Default

    My 79 Artic cat pantera did not have carbides and it did not turn enless you jacked the bars all the way to the side, doing anout 20, and then opened up the gas all the way. It maxed out at 95-110, so doent think that will work on the tundra 250. the artic cat was a 500.
    BIC/Daniel/BS Jr.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •