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Thread: backpacking stove

  1. #1
    Member ripnlip's Avatar
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    Default backpacking stove

    What does everyone recommend for a light backpacking stove? Main uses would be boiling water for meals and purification. So, kinda going away from the jet boil, but still an option.

    I was thinking about the Whisperlite or the other small one from MSR (pocketrocket?).

    I'm iffy about the msr liquid fuel and primer setup...any advice?

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2

    Default Why not JetBoil??

    If your main use for the stove is boiling water than the JetBoil would be ideal. If you plan on cooking with a stove then yeah a JetBoil might not be the best choice. Just curious.

  3. #3
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    I know Alaska_Lanche has all but given up on his MSR whisperlite international. We haven't been too impressed with ease of use and reliability with that setup. I know there have been mulitple threads on this and I'll try to dig a few up for you...

    A few

    Mini Stove

    Jetboil Thread

    Stove Thread

    I know somewhere there is a thread where I believe member Snyd did a (what seemed to be a pretty fair and accurate) test of different stoves and their boil times in sub zero temps. Maybe he'll chime in and lend some advice or a thread link. Hope this helps...

  4. #4
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    No, it wasn't me but a few guys here in Fairbanks/Northpole area did do some tests at 30-40 below this past winter. I think stid was one of them. Anyway, as far as stoves go I've never had an issue with the MSR XGK. Just open the valve to get a trickle of fuel and hit it with a flame. Lots of good options out there. Personally I prefer liquid fuel as opposed to canisters. Lot of guys like that JetBoil though. It looks like a good light compact setup for boiling water in decent temps.

    EDIT: Here's a link to the thread where Stid did some cold weather stove tests.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ve+test&page=2
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  5. #5

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    I have been using a MSR Whisperlite pretty much exclusively for a long time, and it still works great but I did pick up a MSR Pocket Rocket a few seasons ago and really like it. It is very compact and light and I can haul it, and a cannister in my kettle, and take up little to no space and at no real weight expense. I think for most trips that you wont be in sub zero temps (especially early fall) the cannisters are easier to use but its really a trade off. I know when I used to haul 2 large fuel bottles and the Whisperlite I definately took up more space and carried more weight.

  6. #6
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    ...EDIT: Here's a link to the thread where Stid did some cold weather stove tests.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ve+test&page=2
    Stid-Snyd...pretty close I guess (first and last right). Thanks for the heads up!

  7. #7
    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    Default whisperlite

    I've been using the Whisperlite for years. Its my only stove, and I've never had any problems with it. There may be better stoves out there, but I won't know until the Whisperlite just flat doesn't work any more, which I don't see happening any time soon. I've used it at temps from low 80s down to below 0.

  8. #8

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    My favorite is the Snowpeak giga stove. It's light, and you can fit the stove along with a canister of fuel in a titanium cookpot that is made for it. (Just stick them in a ziplock before putting them in the pot.) The model with the peizoelectric lighter is very convenient - just attach the canister, twist the valve, and push the button. No priming or anything; I'm usually eating by the time other people are still cooking. The only problem is that the built-in lighter won't work well if it's wet.

    My experience is that liquid stoves are best when it's really cold or you're at high altitude, but canister stoves are lighter & simpler to set up otherwise. Since the cans are disposable you can't refill them; you might have to bring a spare if it feels like the one you're using is too empty to last the whole trip.
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  9. #9
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    It depends... in temperatures above freezing I tend towards canister stoves, if it is below freezing or I need to make water for a large group, I tend towards a liquid fuel stove.

    For canister stoves I have two favorites - if solo I use a Jetboil. Simple to use, efficient, compact. If I am with a group I use a Primus Eta Power EF stove. It has a larger 2 liter pot, but is still efficient and boils water quickly. I used my Eta on Rainier last year.

    For liquid fuel - I use two stoves - a Whisperlite and an XGK both made by MSR. For a standard winter trip I use my Whisperlite, if I am leading a group, mountaineering or expecting really cold weather I use the XGK because it just puts out a lot of heat and boils water very quickly.

    You guys may have already found it, but there is a site callled www.backpackgeartest.org which does reviews on backpacking gear including stoves. I was lucky enough to test the Jetboil and the Primus stoves for them. If you want to read my reports you can see them here

    Jetboil http://www.backpackgeartest.org/revi...Jason%20Boyle/

    Primus http://www.backpackgeartest.org/revi...Jason%20Boyle/

    Hope that helps.

    Jason B

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    Has anyone tried the MSR reactor stove yet? Mostly good reviews, the pots a bit bigger than the jetboil therefore allowing you to use the bigger MSR canistersl. Packs up the same weighs about 6oz more. Heres a link to it http://www.backcountry.com/store/CAS...tor-Stove.html

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    Member ripnlip's Avatar
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    Default thanks

    Thanks for all the advice guys, very helpful! I tried to search prior to starting the thread but was unsuccessful at finding any helpful "stove" links in here.

    Anyway, I was kinda shying away from the jetboil due to me boiling water for me and another person. I also like to take any leftover boiled water and keep it for drinking. Still an option tho due to weight.

    I lit the reactor up the other day (at the hugger store) and it boiled a liter of water in about 2 minutes. The only problem that I saw was that the top of the stove was convex shaped and may not be able to accomodate another pot to cook/boil with for dual purpose (I could be wrong tho).

    Thanks again and I am still reading all advice....yet to buy anything.

  12. #12
    Member AKPacker's Avatar
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    Default

    I've used a MSR Pocketrocket for a couple of years now and its a great little stove. Its not quite as efficient as the Jetboil or Reactor stoves, but its a heck of a lot less bulky.
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    If I was making water for two people, I would go with a primus eta power stove. The larger pot should allow you to make water for cooking and have some left over for drinking. Just my 2 cents.

    Jason

  14. #14
    Member ripnlip's Avatar
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    Default pots

    Thanks again everyone. I am kinda liking the versatility of the Whisperlite, but like the compact, inexpensive pocketrocket.....I am thinking I will keep my eyes open here for someone selling the whisperlite...perhaps garage sales??????

    Coasty, great field reports!!!!! Thanks!

  15. #15

    Default White Box Stove

    White Box Stove on Ebay, 20 bucks, burns "heet" gasline antifreeze. For Boiling water nothing simpler or lighter. Can take the exact amount of fuel you need and can find fuel in every village. 1 1/2 ounces of fuel will take a pot of snow to a pot of boiling water. No interest, I own one and love it.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/WHITE-BOX-STOVE-...QQcmdZViewItem

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    Another satisfied Whisperlite Int user. Mine is about 14 yrs old now & still going strong.
    Vance in AK.

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  17. #17
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vance in AK View Post
    Another satisfied Whisperlite Int user. Mine is about 14 yrs old now & still going strong.
    +1, I bought mine this past winter but have already put it to use. Also I bought the MSR pans and the stove stores inside the pan.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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  18. #18
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default MSR

    MSR makes great stuff. We float NW Alaska rivers each Fall fly fishing for dollies. I love the Whisperlite International but it does take some practice to preheat and such. A great stove and I trust it totally. For convenience, the pocket rocket is awesome. One step better, and a recent purchase of mine, is the MSR Windpro. It has a fuel line that puts the isobutane cannister about a foot from the stove, so you can use a windscreen. You can't use a wind screen with the pocket rocket. It could blow up. The design of the stove head on the Windpro is wind resistant as well. So if you are going to be in windy conditions, this may be the best choice. Wind really cuts down on the effeciency of these stoves and uses much more fuel. I own all three of these and they are great. Just depends on where you will use it. Casual use in calmer weather, packing light, take the pocket rocket. Windy conditions, take the windpro. Longer expedition trips, take the whisperlite international. Personally, I take the international with two fuel bottles and the windpro with a few cannisters. Best of both worlds you may say. As for cooking, the pocket rocket and windpro are best. It is VERY hard to simmer with the internationals.
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  19. #19
    Member sheep man's Avatar
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    MSR whisperlite all the way,easy to work on when needed.....i can't count how many sheep and goat hunts i've put behind me,but i do know how many times it's failed me 0.

  20. #20
    Member ripnlip's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    for all the help guys! Much appreciated. I ended up picking up a Whisperlite Int'l w/ a 22 oz. bottle used from a guy. Havent tried it much yet but hopefully this weekend.

    Thanks!!!!!

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