Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 44

Thread: Girly Glock...

  1. #1
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default Girly Glock...

    Thought the title would attrack some views but I'm actually posting about getting one for the wife.

    Initially we kind of narrowed it down to 3 models. The G26 9mm, and the G23 and G27 both in .40 S&W. We went to go hold a few (since she turned 21 recently, she can do that now!!). I was leaning toward her getting a .40 since its a little more weapon for the coin but whatever felt good to her was more important. She did like the idea of having the .40 and now she's leaning toward the G23 over the G27.

    Any opinions on both? The 23 is used by many law inforcement agencies and is obviously a proven weapon. Additionally, you can hold more rounds and it comes with a tactical rail. Mistakenly, I got no gunbroker with her and now she wants the TALO model. Is there anything else we should be taking into account? Man, shopping for guns is kind of hard when you cant take 'em out and "test drive" them first...

  2. #2
    Member Whelenator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    338

    Default Girly Glocks

    yeah, I seen your post and thought what is this guy talking about???

    Well, I have the Glock 23, and I really like mine. I bought a 357 Sig barrel for mine like an idiot, but when I got mine, ammo prices was at $8.99 a box for .40, and just a touch more for the 357 Sig. Now, it's $25-$35 a dang box for 357. AAAAARRRRGGGGGHHHH
    Ok, here's my advice, make sure that your WIFE can pull and manipulate the slide and operate the gun 100% before you let her even go shoot one. I say that because my wife has carpal tunnel in her wrists and laccks a bit of strength. Your wife may be a brute (no disrespect meant) strength- wise, and be just fine with it. I feel that the Glock 19 (9mm) would be a SLIGHTLY better choice for a woman, just because 9mm is a little easier to control for MOST women and this is a proven fact that is easily observed. The 9mm is also a fine caliber to stop an attacker with and it still works for the military and several agencies that still use it. There are many great rounds available that would work great, not to mention that the 9mm is still ALMOST affordable to shoot a lot. The bullets, brass, and components are still ALMOST affordable to most reloaders even us on a budget. i said that about making sure she can manipulsate the gun before you buy one because if she can't operate the gun, she really shouldn't carry it as a responsible citizen. I hope you understand where I am coming from, and don't take any offense to what I am saying here. The Glock is a great pistol, even if ugly as h***. I wish I had the 9mm barrel for my .40 so I could practice with cheaper 9mm ammo, and then put the .40 barrel back on when I got home. I personally switched from a Kimber custom shop 1911 45 ACP to get my Glock because I wanted a pistol that would feed gravels and mud if that was all I could find to shoot in it!!
    And it does. The Kimber didn't. End of story. Do I like 1911's? immensely. But to defend me and my family, I use what works. Now, the S&W M&P would also be a great gun, not to mention the Springfield Armory XD's.
    i just prefer the Glock, because I have the most exprience with that.
    You might want to have her check out the S&W and Taurus Titanium revolvers too. They are awesome, and no slouch for defensive use. No hoodlum that grabs your wife's arm and gets a faceful of 38 is gonna not let go and run like a scared rabbit! Good luck


    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    Thought the title would attrack some views but I'm actually posting about getting one for the wife.

    Initially we kind of narrowed it down to 3 models. The G26 9mm, and the G23 and G27 both in .40 S&W. We went to go hold a few (since she turned 21 recently, she can do that now!!). I was leaning toward her getting a .40 since its a little more weapon for the coin but whatever felt good to her was more important. She did like the idea of having the .40 and now she's leaning toward the G23 over the G27.

    Any opinions on both? The 23 is used by many law inforcement agencies and is obviously a proven weapon. Additionally, you can hold more rounds and it comes with a tactical rail. Mistakenly, I got no gunbroker with her and now she wants the TALO model. Is there anything else we should be taking into account? Man, shopping for guns is kind of hard when you cant take 'em out and "test drive" them first...

  3. #3

    Default

    Save your money and just run .44 Specials in your .629 S&W. The kick won't be nearly as bad as a mag and its simple to operate. Plus then you can take that 500 bones and go deer hunting in Missouri this Oct.

  4. #4
    Member aces-n-eights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    189

    Default

    I have a Glock 23 and like it a lot. I think the larger frame of the 23 over the 27 makes it a bit easier to shoot, but the 27 will be easier to conceal. Between the 26 (9mm) and the 27 (.40), i'd definitely get a 27 because you can get a 9mm barrel for the 27 and have both .40 and 9mm in one gun. You can't put a .40 barrel in a 26.
    English is an odd language. It can understood through tough thorough thought, though.

  5. #5
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    Save your money and just run .44 Specials in your .629 S&W. The kick won't be nearly as bad as a mag and its simple to operate. Plus then you can take that 500 bones and go deer hunting in Missouri this Oct.
    Lets take her out and have her watch my wife roll through some 44 mag rounds and she will be ordering pink grips for that 629 in no time! Then you will be in the market for a new pistol for yourself! I made the mistake of letting my wife shoot my redhawk now I have to ask her to borrow MY redhawk!

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    2,145

    Default

    For a woman getting into it, don't get a Glock. They are really snappy pistols, and the slide is hard to work for a woman. There is also the problem of limp-wristing causing stovepies.

    I have two nieces, 11 and 13, who BEG me to bring my .45's with me when we go out shooting. They LOVE to shoot them. The narrow grip, mass, and barrel length go into a much more controllable firearm. If you want a semi-auto of course.

    Most of the posts on here touting the .44 are written by men, so you should immediately disregard them. Women are human beings who are not men. So the choosing should be done by the woman without any pressure from you. The best way to do this is take her to a gunshop that is female-friendly, and turn her loose. Once she has picked out a couple that she likes to hold in her hand, find someone who has that piece, and let your wife shoot it.

    Nothing girly about a Glock, unless you have it finished in fuschia or hot pink.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

  7. #7
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    Save your money and just run .44 Specials in your .629 S&W. The kick won't be nearly as bad as a mag and its simple to operate. Plus then you can take that 500 bones and go deer hunting in Missouri this Oct.
    The 629 feels cumbersome and bulky in her hands and she would feel more comfortable carrying something a little bit smaller. Besides, she is wanting something that she may want to take a defense course with someday, so I guess we'll see...Besides, if I get her an auto-loading handgun, then I'll have to get one too (either the G20 or G29!!!)

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Lets take her out and have her watch my wife roll through some 44 mag rounds and she will be ordering pink grips for that 629 in no time! Then you will be in the market for a new pistol for yourself! I made the mistake of letting my wife shoot my redhawk now I have to ask her to borrow MY redhawk!
    Yeah, mine can roll the .44 ok along with my little sister...its really not that big of a deal for her to shoot it, I just imagine she would have a better time shooting a smaller caliber. She has already admited the 629's bark is worse than its bite but if its not fun for her to shoot, then I'm probably going to have a hard time getting her to come along as often...

    Quote Originally Posted by Nitroman View Post
    For a woman getting into it, don't get a Glock. They are really snappy pistols, and the slide is hard to work for a woman. There is also the problem of limp-wristing causing stovepies.

    I have two nieces, 11 and 13, who BEG me to bring my .45's with me when we go out shooting. They LOVE to shoot them.
    I thought I read a post my Murphy among others who said Glocks were great for limp-wristed people, saying they will always feed even with a limp wrist.

    What make/model of .45?

  8. #8

    Default

    Sig,

    I was joking about the 629, but you should still come to Missouri if all our schedules line up.

  9. #9
    Member Whelenator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    338

    Default stovepiping

    anyone that says a Glock is great for limp wristed people because it will still feed doesn't have any real experience with them, and that's bad advice to give someone. I have seen this happen to men and women on an equal basis. My brother is a construction worker and stout as a small bear and I watched him get a jam with my G-23. He was just relaxing his grip a bit much with the pistol because I told him the loads were super easy going, and didn't recoil too much. So, with that advice, he limp wristed it just a bit much. Now, it doesn't take a person long to figure out how to fix it, but you can't get dead but one time, so I guess it's ok to get stovepipe jams now and then right??


    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    The 629 feels cumbersome and bulky in her hands and she would feel more comfortable carrying something a little bit smaller. Besides, she is wanting something that she may want to take a defense course with someday, so I guess we'll see...Besides, if I get her an auto-loading handgun, then I'll have to get one too (either the G20 or G29!!!)


    Yeah, mine can roll the .44 ok along with my little sister...its really not that big of a deal for her to shoot it, I just imagine she would have a better time shooting a smaller caliber. She has already admited the 629's bark is worse than its bite but if its not fun for her to shoot, then I'm probably going to have a hard time getting her to come along as often...


    I thought I read a post my Murphy among others who said Glocks were great for limp-wristed people, saying they will always feed even with a limp wrist.

    What make/model of .45?

  10. #10
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Found what I was looking for...

    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    ...I have owned six different Glocks and have shot at least 100 more, for various reasons. I've owned a lot more 1911s, about 25 or so. The 1911 seems to feed very well out of the box when they are rack grade (loose fitting) and hardball is used but when using soft point/hollow point in a gun that is a little tighter they often have feeding problems, most get better after a 500-1000 round break in. It order for them to be extremely accurate, which they can be they must be hand fitted and tuned to feed everything, which they can be, they are very expensive. My first choice would always be a 1911. It will be hand fitted and tuned to feed every thing and put all shots into 3" at fifty yards, I have some just like that. The cheapest one cost $1500. Beautiful, reliable, rugged, dependable with a good source of pats to make them fully field repairable.

    The Glock is cheap, ugly, reliable, rugged, dependable with a good source of parts and accessories but not generally field repairable.

    Glock is the least likely auto-loading handgun to fail to feed. I have shot all of the available, and no longer available, pistols from the P08 Luger to the XD Springfield. There may be a couple of the Johnie-come-lately pistols I've missed, but you get the idea. Glock works better than all of them. The will feed any ammo, I've run about 100 thousand rounds of handloads through a few of them.

    I've never experienced the malfunctions described in your original thread, I'm sure there have been some. There are a huge number of Glocks out there and many of them are in incapable hands.

    One thing I've noticed about the Glock, it is not susceptable to the limp wrist failures of most of the other pistols. When we limp wrist a gun, that absorbs the recoil energy of the slide and usually prevents the gun from cycling, I've never even seen that with a Glock. I've loaned Glocks to students who could not cycle a M92, or even a SiG and they could shoot a Glock. Of course that's a piss poor excuse to buy a Glock, one should learn to shoot correctly, but the point is, the gun works in less than ideal shooter performance.

    The low manufacturing cost is why the police departments bought them in the first place. The reason they are still in use is because the do work.

    I really like the Sigs, but the Glock is a more relaible feeder. The CZ is a very good rugged design, but like the 1911, it requires a bit of fit and polish to be top notch. I have a Sphinx (Swiss made CZ clone) that is the best "CZ" ever, but here again quite pricey. (And no longer made.)

    There is the Kahr T-9, one heck of a nicely made highly reliable pistol, I think it is still made if you want a nine. I just sold one which had 2400 rounds in through it since new and never failed to feed any thing. Truely the only rival for feeding for any Glock. I just didn't own the Kahr long enough to shoot it much. I would prefer the T-9 to any Glock or anything else, if I needed a nine.

    The Glocks are striker fired. They are grab-and-shoot, one handed, either hand, pistols. The Kahr, the Sigma, and a couple others are in this category. (No manual safety lever, no visable hammer, no external "gear shift" required to shoot.) The 1911 is an entirely different animal and it defies logic to consider only the Glock or the 1911. It makes me think you need more education in the different types of auto-loader lockwork.

    What is the differences and advantages/disadvantages of each of the different types of auto-loading pistols?

  11. #11
    Member Spanman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    on the Creek
    Posts
    136

    Default Girl with Glock

    This is what I thought you meant.....
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    493

    Default

    My girlfriend shoots a Taurus in .41 magnum, and she loves it. And we have the added benefit of shooting the same ammo when were out and about.

  13. #13

    Default

    Depending on their fit to her hand and the desire for concealability, I would take either the 26 or the 23. If you want a sub CCW piece go with the 26... the 27 is a little much for most ladies and some guys. That 40 in the sub frame will really rock it back upon firing. The 26 is noticeably milder.... surprisingly.

    The 23 now... different story. Even thought it's just a little bit larger than the 27 it's much easier for most people to handle. If the compact is permissible the 23 is a great choice. You could also put an extension on the 27, but then the overall length of the grips is just as long as the 23..... may as well get the larger one since the print usually comes from the grip anyway.
    Hunting, camping & shooting goodies. http://www.laksupply.com

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    2,145

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    What make/model of .45?
    I have a pair of the Argentine Systema .45's.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

  15. #15
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    Glocks very rarely have feed problems. I've trained hundreds of shooters through tens of thousands of rounds in Glocks and have only seen 1 stovepipe. I've witnessed a lot of "limp wristing" without any malfunctions. Feedway malfunctions just don't happen. The failure to fire malfunction, which is always operator induced (usually an unseated magazine), is the only one I've seen recur and it is still infrequent.

    The .40S&W is a poor caliber choice for a weak shooter, however. You'll be much better off with either 9mm (there is some really good 9mm ammo on the market these days) or a 45ACP.

    Finally, when comparing the full size vs. compact vs. sub-compact frames within a caliber, the circumference of the grip remains constant. So if a shooter's hand doesn't fit the model 22, it isn't going to fit the 23 or the 27 because the grips are just shorter, not smaller around.

    If you're going to pick an auto pistol for a new shooter, a Glock is certainly at the top of the list for reliability and simplicity. Training by an experienced Glock instructor is always highly recommended for any new Glock shooter.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  16. #16
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    The .40S&W is a poor caliber choice for a weak shooter, however. You'll be much better off with either 9mm (there is some really good 9mm ammo on the market these days) or a 45ACP.
    I am curious as to why you would recommend the 45 over the 40. Also, I'll be sending you a PM later today!!

  17. #17
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    The 40S&W has a very "sharp" recoil, and it is enhanced when you're using a rather lightweight gun like the Glock where the 40 is basically packaged in the frame of a 9mm gun. When you move to the 45, the recoil is generally easier to manage and the 45 is actually a heavier gun, which contributes to the reduced felt recoil. If you shoot a 45ACP in a heavy 1911 style gun, then grab a Glock in 40S&W, you'll quickly see what I'm talking about.

    The primary problem I see with 40S&W and inexperienced shooters is that you end up developing a "flinch" reflex right out of the gate. Once a new shooter gets a flinch, it is very hard to unlearn it and their accuracy will suffer. If they can't hit the target and dread the recoil, they won't enjoy shooting and it will just spiral downhill from that point. I firmly believe that you should start out new shooters on smaller calibers that are easy to manage. In most cases, I would train with a 22LR or even an airgun for a brand new shooter to teach stance, grip, trigger control, sight alignment, etc. Then you graduate up to a gun style and caliber that is comfortable and enjoyable for that shooter. The next step up is in the .38Spc or 9mm area. Both calibers offer both comfortable practice as well as good real world self-defense options. If they like the shooting experience, they will be willing to learn and practice. With more experience, they will be able to handle larger calibers successfully.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  18. #18
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Joat, it seems like that may be good advice. I guess another option might be getting the glock 23 and getting a 9mm barrel for it. Either that or go with a g26 or something of that sort.

    Dang work computers wont let me look up "gun related things" online so what model options do they offer in a .45? I imagine a standard, compact and subcompact?

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    The 40S&W has a very "sharp" recoil, and it is enhanced when you're using a rather lightweight gun like the Glock where the 40 is basically packaged in the frame of a 9mm gun. When you move to the 45, the recoil is generally easier to manage and the 45 is actually a heavier gun, which contributes to the reduced felt recoil. If you shoot a 45ACP in a heavy 1911 style gun, then grab a Glock in 40S&W, you'll quickly see what I'm talking about.
    I'm sure you have shot many more rounds than I through both 1911s and Glocks. However, I have a 1911 which weighs 42oz unloaded (standard 1911 is about 38oz) and it hits my hands noticeably harder than my Glock 22. Maybe that's just a function of the narrower grip on the 1911.

    I've also seen several FTE malfs with Glocks due to limp wristing. These had to be cleared using a type 3 malf drill as they were not "wipable" using a type 2.

  20. #20
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akav8r View Post
    I've also seen several FTE malfs with Glocks due to limp wristing. These had to be cleared using a type 3 malf drill as they were not "wipable" using a type 2.
    Could you explain this in lay-people terms? FTE? type 3 vs. type 2?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •