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Thread: Nodwell 110 Tracks

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Default Nodwell 110 Tracks

    Anyone out know of someone with some rubber for a Nodwell 110. I've got the 82 grouser tracks. If anyone knows of any suppliers of Nodwell rubber please let me know the Info. Thanks in Advance.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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  2. #2

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    I got some tracks that are metal grouser and held together with really thick rubber. you are welcome to have them if they will work for you. but you got to wait untill i get home from the slope on may 6th.

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    There is a place between the old and new seward around 70th ave, that restores/refurbishes nodwells. They have new rubber sent up all the time.

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Thanks thats Ray he a bundle of knowledge and doesn't mind when I bend his ear. I was just hoping maybe sombody had some rubber or knew someone with some sitting around or some places to look. Ray can get me the rubber but its not cheap.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

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    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    I'll ask a friend tonight if he might know anyone with some. He has a RN75 and might even have something laying around.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jkb View Post
    Thanks thats Ray he a bundle of knowledge and doesn't mind when I bend his ear. I was just hoping maybe sombody had some rubber or knew someone with some sitting around or some places to look. Ray can get me the rubber but its not cheap.

    Hi I'm from New Zealand and I have just got an old Nodwel RN75.....
    This guy Ray who is mentioned is there some contact info I can get for him...
    Want to pick his brain about oil for the rear transmission as I can't find out from anyone what is correct
    oil to use for it.
    If someone knows what would be the correct oil to use for my RN75 transmission
    can you let me know.


    By the way I think that the rock conveyor belting would work for the tracks?
    The type that is uses for bringing out rock & coal from underground mines..
    As mines frequently replace this stuff and it's not even that old or worn out I think
    you could get some cheap from them.. That's my plan anyways to go on a scrounge from those guys..

    Thanks.... You can email me at chris@gloriavale.co.nz

    Chris
    Last edited by chugbry; 05-27-2012 at 15:06. Reason: adding info

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    Member polardds's Avatar
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    chugbry,

    Rae has moved up on the Hillside here in Anchorage. His shop was "Alaska Machine and Equipment." He is mainly just parts now, but he is still a wealth of knowledge. I will email this to you as well with his phone number.

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    For the rear end you need to use a straight mineral oil. You can get it from Chevron, Lubriplate, I believe from Cat and there probably are others. 75-90W is the most common, use what ever suits your weather conditions. If you're going to operate in a lot of mud, the rear end will get hot. If you're going to do a lot of turning, the rear ends will get hot. If you're mainly operating in the summer run 90W, maybe even 120W. If you operate in the winter below 0*F, it's hard to get the rear end warmed up at first with 90W and therefore it's awful hard to steer when the steering bands can't grab due to cold and stiff oil.

    DON'T use gear lube in the rear end, or else have another set of brake bands made up so that you can change them when already installed brake bands build up glaze on them from the gear lube and won't grab anymore to turn the rig.

    Depending on who rebuilt the rear end last, there are seals to keep the oil from running from the rear differential out to the planetaries. If you're running side hills a lot, leave the seals in to keep the gear lube from running from one side of the rear end to the other. If you're running in the flats, take the seals out. This allows better cooling of the rear end and the planetaries. If you take the seals out, then you will obviously be running the same oil in both the planetaries and the rear end. If the seals are out, don't bother filling the planetaries themselves, just fill the rear end and it will flow out to the planetaries - but you do have to drain them seperatly.

    A spare part you must always carry is brass pins in the planetaries. They are there to break if you put too much stress of the rear end turning it or are carrying too heavy of loads. There are three on each side. I think they're around a $100 each US now. If you have to buy them from Cananda, buy one, this will also save you on shipping weight. Then find a machine shop to turn you some additional ones down there. Also, even if they aren't broke, pull the planetary covers and check them for wear. It will cause a lot of other problems if there are large groove worn in the pins. When the pins aren't in good condition then the three planetary gears that rotate around the brass pins, don't mesh right with the main sun gear. Check your pins and carry three spares.

    Yes, you can make tracks out of used conveyor belt material. Drilling all of the holes is a pain. They make special drill bits for that. Find a shop that makes or sells conveyor belts. Also, if you find used belting and it's too wide, the belting shop can cut it down a lot easier than you can. As for thickness, you can go at least two plies of belting thicker than the original Nodwell tracks without any problems.

    Back to your question on the oil, I had assumed you were talking about the rear end. If you were talking about the transmission behind the engine, then run standard 75 - 90W gear lube in it.

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