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Thread: Halibut spots from Whittier

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    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    Question Halibut spots from Whittier

    I'm heading out of Whittier mid-May to do some bear hunting and was wondering if anyone had any coordinates that may hold some Halibut, out of Whittier. We plan on doing some fishing as well while we are out, but have never Halibut fished there. If anyone is willing to share any good spots, please PM me.

    Thanks,
    Darryl

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    Member Maast's Avatar
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    Take a look at the chart just outside of Pigot Bay

    http://www.sailvector.com/2601/Princ...d-Western-Part

    Look at the 3 relatively shallow spots, they should be just past the top on the leeward side of those mounds feeding on the stuff that is coming over the top with the current.

    Also, if you look around that chart you'll see 3 relatively shallow spots in port wells heading north from passage canal. Should be there too.

    Keep in mind that the chart is in fathoms (6 feet) so you're looking at depths of 78 to 558 feet down.

    Also, a marine biologist at the sportsmans show told me they hang around esther rock too.

    Hope this helps

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    montague island
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    Didn't think Halibut went on dry land, oops...unless they are caught and taken on land. Montague is a big island, should I look in the middle of the island, in the trees, or in the open areas...LOL...

    Thanks for the reference to Montague but I know that somewhere around the island there will be halibut, but, I was knida hoping someone could be more specific. I am not looking for anyones special, secret honey holes, just some coordinates to a couple of chicken holes. Like I said, we will be looking for bears and would like to drop a line if we get the time, we won't be concentrating on looking for fishing spots and watching a depth sounder for ledges, humps and bottom structure; so, I thought that someone out there might help a brother out.

    D

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    Default Ummm

    Consistent halibut is difficult in PWS and if somebody has found a productive chicken hole, they are not likely to give out the coordinates.

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    the first spot that i found when i started out of whittier was herring bay,i know there is an upper and lower. upper when drifting through you can pickup yellow eye, dusky,and a few ling. going between the bays in 80-240' you can pick up halibut,flounder, and cod. lower bay is the same as upper but did get a 100# butt in 50' of water. you can pick up salmon around knight island but i usualy see them jumping first then cast to them. hope this helps and enjoy your fishing.jeff

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OKElkHunter View Post
    I am not looking for anyones special, secret honey holes, just some coordinates to a couple of chicken holes.
    Understand that PWS is vastly different than Homer or Seward when it comes to halibut. A chicken hole is considered by most to be a "special, secret honey hole" when fishing out of Whittier. PWS is mostly well over 1,000' deep, and many spots are over 2,000'. The spots shallow enough to sportfish for halibut are few, and the productive areas are even fewer.

    Any spot shallow enough to fish might produce a halibut. Whenever we're anchored up for the night, even in 30' of water, we'll drop a line over the side. We've often caught 20-30 pounders in the shallow bays, but never more than two in any one spot. Productive chicken holes are tough to find in PWS, so don't expect much in the way of coordinates.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Understand that PWS is vastly different than Homer or Seward when it comes to halibut. A chicken hole is considered by most to be a "special, secret honey hole" when fishing out of Whittier. PWS is mostly well over 1,000' deep, and many spots are over 2,000'. The spots shallow enough to sportfish for halibut are few, and the productive areas are even fewer.

    Any spot shallow enough to fish might produce a halibut. Whenever we're anchored up for the night, even in 30' of water, we'll drop a line over the side. We've often caught 20-30 pounders in the shallow bays, but never more than two in any one spot. Productive chicken holes are tough to find in PWS, so don't expect much in the way of coordinates.
    Hence I say go to Montegue and fish wherever the charter boats out of seward fish. I spent a summer in Main bay once, I caught 1 butt, and it wasn't for lack of trying. Not many in PWS at all.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks everyone. I got a couple of ideas and will hit a couple of humps that I know about, but will be concentrating on looking for bears during the daylight, I'll definately try the line over the side while we are anchored up for the night.

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    Be careful with the line over the side for the night. You have to remember the tide change will raise or lower your bait 12 feet in fairly short order. Then as the tide changes direction the boat shifts on anchor and now your fishing line is tangled in your anchor line.

    I'm speaking from my own experiences.

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    Which also happens when you hook onto something while you are not paying any attention whatsoever. It is not the end of the world.

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    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
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    Just a note about hanging a line over the side while anchored up for the night, straight from the F&G website.

    Sport fishing gear: Unless provided in 5 AAC 75.020 -- 5 AAC 75.049 (area-specific regulations), or by the area regulations in 5 AAC 46 -- 5 AAC 70, sport fishing may only be conducted by the use of a single line having attached to it not more than one plug, spoon, spinner, or series of spinners, or two flies, or two hooks. The line must be closely attended. The use of any explosive or toxicant for taking fish in the waters of Alaska is prohibited.

    I'm not sure that sleeping in the cabin a few feet away qualifies as "closely attended".
    And here's a link to the reg's for those who want to bone up on what's allowed, and what's not.

    And, just to be helpful, if you're heading out near Montegue try your luck near the Needle. It's a fairly popular spot.
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you canít tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Just a note: When I suggested tossing a line over the side, I meant that I do so while sitting on the deck with friends enjoying a beer. The pole is always attended, though the action is slooooow to non-existant at times. We'd be out on the deck enjoying ourselves anyhow, so why not drop a baited hook? We do not leave it out overnight or unattended.

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    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
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    Just wanted to clarify for those who might not have understood that.
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you canít tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

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    Default Attended Line

    You could loop it around your big toe while catching some zees.

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    It has never occurred to me that it would be a great idea to throw my line over the side while I took a nap in the cabin. But, I will admit I have anchored in 200 feet of water and played cards, monopoly, or even watched a video in the cabin when the fishing was just bad. A couple of times I even have caught a nice surprise fish. Although most of the time, even when engrossed in something else, I know immediately when I get a bite. Not that there is any hurry when fishing with a circle hook.....

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    thats why they invented clickers. i see no problem with being preoccupied with something else while you have a bait soaking. playing cards, cooking, cleaning up. i dont know about anyone else but when i am out in the boat with a line out the most important thing on my mind is my line.

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    Default Night Fishing

    I agree with AK River Rat. Turn the clicker on and set the drag light. The main problem with fishing at night is you fall a sleep and they steal your bait. Watch you tides alot of big fish will come into the different bay on high tide and then leave as low tide starts. You just have to be ready for them.

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    if you are soaking bait while doing other things there is a way to keep the bait on and not let the bait thieves steal it. one thing i use and its cheap. stretchy string at walmart... under $2 they use it for spawn sacks. i used it at bonniville dam,catching sturgeon in fast moving water. it can still be removed but usually it stays on even when the big ones hit it. just carry scissors to cut it off when you change baits. also works well surf casting. just a suggestion. jeff

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akfun View Post
    if you are soaking bait while doing other things there is a way to keep the bait on and not let the bait thieves steal it. one thing i use and its cheap. stretchy string at walmart... under $2 they use it for spawn sacks. i used it at bonniville dam,catching sturgeon in fast moving water. it can still be removed but usually it stays on even when the big ones hit it. just carry scissors to cut it off when you change baits. also works well surf casting. just a suggestion. jeff
    You mean this stuff????


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