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Thread: Electric Bear Fence

  1. #1

    Default Electric Bear Fence

    Anyone ever try one of the portable electric fences? Do they work? Sounds like it could be good to keep bears and such out of your camp while your gone for the day.

    Thanks,
    Mike

  2. #2
    Member TYNMON's Avatar
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    Default Electric fences...

    They are extremely effective..... One thing to consider... You must weed wack any vegitation and make the low wire low...If you get a cub inside the fence.. That is bad.

  3. #3

    Default Yes

    They also work great while you are in for the day!!!

    Helps for that good night sleep.

    Of course they will not stop a charging bear, or even one that really, really wants your bacon grease, but the unmotivated, prowling, curious bear will be deterred.

    Good luck

  4. #4

    Default

    Any brand you recommend? Can these be rented in Anchorage?

    Thanks again,
    Mike

  5. #5

    Default

    The most common that I see sold for bears is the Zareba Yellow Jacket Electric Fence Charger. I bought one of these and also use it to keep raccoons out of my chicken coup. It's quite feeble running on 4 D batteries (6 volts), even on the high setting. My fence is only 36 feet long. The local kids had contests on who could hold it the longest. Then one day I converted it to 12volts (which you could easy do in the field with a 12V lantern battery or two 4 D cell battery holders), now no one touches it.

  6. #6

    Default

    Any idea how much that unit goes for? Does it include everything you need?

  7. #7

  8. #8
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    Default

    We took two electric fences on our last fly out hunt on the North slope, one I put together myself and the other from one of the bear spray companies. UDAP, I think. We were real happy with both. One fence around our tents and the other around our meat cache. A bear took a dump between the two fences, but never woke us or bothered our meat.

    Here's a link from the USGS detailing how to put your own together and their results with the fence.
    http://www.absc.usgs.gov/research/br...ic_fencing.htm

  9. #9
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Electric bear fences

    1. Do they work? First off, I don't have any personal experience yet, but I've been reading about these fences in preparation for a September float hunt. I'll share info I've found, most of which just confirmed what experienced forum contributors had said. Those pros/cons/ pitfalls are included in this article by Ak Fish & Game and includes recommended specs (6,000 volts, etc):
    http://www.wildlifenews.alaska.gov/i...rticles_id=174

    2. Listing of vendors:
    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...fences#vendors
    I visited the High Country Enterprises booth at the GASS - surprised to find the rafting- or backpacking-appropriate kits weighing only 2# or 4#. He lives in Palmer, but looks like Wiggy's and Eagle Enterprises carry his kits too. See: http://www.electrobearguard.com/Product.html

    3. Other sources: This one, referenced by Ak F&G has practical advice: http://www.absc.usgs.gov/research/br...ic_fencing.htm

  10. #10
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    Default

    Three Bears here in Kenai has the UDAP kit with enough fence to do a 30' square enclosure for about $200. I think hey claim about 2.5# w/o batteries, & 3.5# with 4 D cells.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  11. #11

    Default

    Thanks for the responses! It looks like if we'll be camping on gravel bars we may need to use a two wire setup (one hot, one ground) due to the gravel not being a good ground. I'm thinking of setting them up so the hot and ground wires would be about 2 inches apart (ground at 28" off the ground and the hot at 30"). That make sense? Anyone ever use this method? Figure they need to be close so the bear would touch both at same time, any further apart and I think it might not touch both at same time.

    Thanks again,
    Mike

  12. #12

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeStaten View Post
    Thanks for the responses! It looks like if we'll be camping on gravel bars we may need to use a two wire setup (one hot, one ground) due to the gravel not being a good ground. I'm thinking of setting them up so the hot and ground wires would be about 2 inches apart (ground at 28" off the ground and the hot at 30"). That make sense? Anyone ever use this method? Figure they need to be close so the bear would touch both at same time, any further apart and I think it might not touch both at same time.

    Thanks again,
    Mike
    Two inches is probably too close. You could have arcing problems between the hot and the ground. Also, the further that the juice flows through the animal, the better the response. I would also bring along a short ground rod, just in case you camp on a wet sandy gravel bar (just for more piece of mind) I use polytape and not wire for my fences. There seems to be enough on zareba's small rolls(if I remember right) to put two hots and two grounds around two tents and a cooking area. You can improvise posts from paddles, tree branches or sticks, and I make insulators out of cable ties or duck tape. I don't agree with the state that you should use 5-7Kv. That seems real low to me. As I previously stated, when my fence around my chicken coup (a zareba yellow jacket, with 36 feet of fence) was powered with 4 D cells (6 volts), the neighborhood kids would have contests to see who could hold it the longest. I use alternating hots and grounds on my fence and they would grab a hot wire in one hand and a ground in the other and hold on. This was on the high setting with fresh batteries. If you look at the chart below, you can see that the fence was producing 6KV.

    http://www.zarebasystems.com/support/test.aspx

    One day I converted it over so that it was powered by a 12v wall wart power supply. I forgot to warn the kids. The fence was now producing 12KV, that kid went into orbit. No one touches the fence now.

  13. #13

    Wink Electric Bear Fences

    Numerous tests have been made with electric fence on bears and the minimum effective voltage is 2500 volts. Bears primary sensory is their nose and 99% of the time will touch the fence with their nose. I have personally tested a 3 wire system, 2 hot and one ground wire between the hot wires, on gravel bare where the earth ground is not good. A black bear touched all three wires with his nose, did not feel the shock and then walked through the fence. He got tangled in the fence and was getting shocked enough then that he did not stick around to long to do too much damage to the cook tent. The best application for pour earth ground areas (gravel bares) is a net fence that has the positive and negative conductors alternating down the fence every 4 inches. Other wise the 2 wire fences systems work very will. High Country Enterprise sells several models including a net fence. The prices for these kits may be a little higher than some other brands but if you compare the quality there is a big difference. The way I look at it is this thing is protecting me and my gear; I want something I can trust and is well built to last.
    The compact units use a fence charger that puts out 9000 volts and runs on 2 AA batteries. It also has a 12 volt adapter. High Country’s internet is www.electrobearguard.com

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