Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Best fillet knife?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Knik-Fairview, Alaska
    Posts
    927

    Default Best fillet knife?

    My two Kershaw filleting knifes are getting tired ...and I'd like something that is flexible, sharp enough to split a hair, and KEEPS it's edge while I fillet piles of salmon (cutting through rib bones, sometimes in/out of spine etc). Who makes the best fillet knife that meets these requirements? I'm more concerned about quality than I am price...

    Brian

  2. #2

    Default

    You'll probably laugh at this but I really like the ole Rapala filet knives, they are super easy to sharpen and are very flexible. The price is right too.

  3. #3

    Default Rapala

    I am going to say the standard old Rapala fillet knives are the best. They are easy to sharpen, hold an edge, and are perfectly flexible. Cheap too. I have filleted more fish than I can count, mostly with a nine inch Rapala. I prefer the ones with the black rubber handle for better grip.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    58

    Default Might Give

    Wusthof brand a look.

    Great German Steel. Best I have found so far.

  5. #5
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default Cutco Knives

    I have the cutco Fisherman's Solution. Stays sharp, adjustable from 6 to 9 inches. The blade is changeable so a fresh blade is always ready and they have a lifetime warranty. Great product. comes with a stone and fancy case.
    http://www.cutco.com/products/produc...itemGroup=5721

    Steve

  6. #6

    Default

    I too like the ol' standard Rapala fillet knives. Not only for filleting fish, but I lost count how many deer I processed with them. I just like the flexible blade for taking meat off the bone, cutting steaks, etc. And for the price, I don't feel so bad when one needs to be replaced.

  7. #7
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I have the cutco Fisherman's Solution. Stays sharp, adjustable from 6 to 9 inches. The blade is changeable so a fresh blade is always ready and they have a lifetime warranty. Great product. comes with a stone and fancy case.
    http://www.cutco.com/products/produc...itemGroup=5721

    Steve
    And a handy line cutting notch when in the sheath. I have 3 guide friends who use these knives probably more than most people ALL summer long (and all winter in one of their cases...he made it a personal goal to fish everyday of the year or something like that) and they like them a lot.

  8. #8

  9. #9
    Member arcticat500's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    82

    Default CUTCO is the way to go

    I have had my share of fillet knives in my life. I got the CUTCO adjustable last year and absolutely love it. My second would be the Cabelas fillet knife. I have gone through buckets of perch at a time without sharpening, and the last one comes out as good as the first.
    Although some can call it Catchin', I still have to call it fishin'.

  10. #10
    Member jmg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    At the end of the cul-de-sac
    Posts
    964

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by arcticat500 View Post
    I have had my share of fillet knives in my life. I got the CUTCO adjustable last year and absolutely love it. My second would be the Cabelas fillet knife. I have gone through buckets of perch at a time without sharpening, and the last one comes out as good as the first.
    My wife got me the Cutco this past year for my birthday. I am very much looking forward to trying it out soon.

  11. #11

    Default Cutco

    Takes care of my fish chores; it replaced my old Rapala, I've still got it for a back up but have never had to use it.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  12. #12
    Member algonquin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seldovia, alaska
    Posts
    840

    Default knife's

    Hi, I've guided fishing in the salt in the lower Cook for eight years and the best I've ever found is a old heavy back bone chief knife that had been ground too many times and they were going to throw it away at the restraunt my son worked at. He had the knife sharpener grind it to a simi-straight blade. One pass per side and the fish is done, thru bones and all head to tail. one min per fish.

  13. #13
    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    Not to change the subject and no offense but if I was paying a guide to take me out fishing I'd be extremely unhappy recieving fish with any bones in it. A decent knife in the right hands can fillet a fish in 1 minute with no bones about it and less waste than 99% of what you normally see.

    I'm happy with my Helle fillet knife although the wife says she wants a cutco.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default Fillet Knife

    I've got an old one marketed by G66 that I picked up in the early 80's. It has an offset blade that is great for the second fillet if you are right handed. I sharpen it occasionally with a fine crock stone and it stays very sharp. Wish I could find another one!

    I keep the knife with a Kevlar glove and won't cut up a fish without the glove. The ability to grip the fish and also not get cut is an absolute must yet I see many people cleaning fish without them.

    It is amazing all the junk that I'm seeing sold as knifes. The first thing I look for in a fillet knife is a double tapered blade - ground to a taper from the hilt to tip and from the back of the knife to the edge. A lot of blades are actualy made from flat steel with a taper in only one direction.

    Most if not all of the Chinese stuff is junk- I haven't found a knife with any decent Chinese steel in it yet. Some of the Japanese steel is quite good esp. the older knifes with the duller grey molyendium steel. German stuff is usually good but some of the German brands like Hinkle are starting to maket knifes made in locations other than Germany.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  15. #15
    Member Big Al's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Palmer,Alaska
    Posts
    1,737

    Default

    Browning, made in Mexico knifes. Have been the best I have given to my wife. She picked them out at a knife store and complained tome about the handles not fitting her small hands. Quick work by a custom knife maker took that problem away. These two knifes have proven to be the best, vary flexible with a lot going for them.

    10 seasons and still going strong.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  16. #16

    Default Have to chime in on the Cutco

    Not only do they have a no questions asked lifetime warranty, but the ability to swap blades is nice.
    I actually met with the local rep as well...name is Josh, and if you google Cutco and Anchorage, his name and number will come up. He came out and met with me on Friday to sharpen my knife....yes, I have and can sharpen the knife, but I wanted to see how the cutco person did it. Anyway, he will be at the Saturday market, Saturdays only, selling the fillet knife (among others)...so you can catch him there.

    I also have a Dexter Russle that I like, though the blade is a little bit stiffer than the Cutco. The cutco has cut through many hbut and salmon without a sharpening.

    Can't go wrong with the Cutco.

  17. #17
    Member algonquin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seldovia, alaska
    Posts
    840

    Default cutting fish

    AKBIGHORN, Just didn't explain well, or complete. After you cut the slabs off you always have pin bones and the rib bones on the gut cavity you just slice out and you can read thru the carcas. I really don't do messy cuts or ever waste meat.Also never had a complaint.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •