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Thread: Walleye boat in AK

  1. #1
    Member zpoehler's Avatar
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    Default Walleye boat in AK

    I'm moving from MN to AK in June and i'm considering bringing my boat up with me. We're most likely moving to Wasilla and i'm wondering if my boat will be fine for running the rivers in that area? If I were to buy a boat in AK I would look for a boat that I would be able to run the rivers, lakes, and the ocean as well...I'm thinking my boat will do just fine for all of the above but a few people have told me i'm going to need a jet to run the rivers. The boat is a 17' Lund angler deep vee, side console with a 94" beam and Yamaha 115 4 stroke with a 8 hp kicker. I'm looking for opinions. I don't want to haul the boat up to AK and find out I need something different.
    Here's a few pics of the boat to give you an idea of the shape.
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    Member Stogey's Avatar
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    Talking Photo

    I don't believe I have ever pulled over so I could take a picture of my boat!

  3. #3
    Member Stogey's Avatar
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    Question River, Lakes, Ocean

    Some of the rivers guys run boats on are SHALLOW. Talking inches of water.

    The Kenai river is not one of those, it's got some decent depth, but your boat doesn't fit the Kenai River management requirements. (Motor is WAY big - has to be 50hp or less and must be 4 stroke (some exceptions for 2 strokes)... dimensions of your boat might fit (yes there are restrictions for that too on the Kenai)....

    The Big Susitna is sporadically deep and shallow. I'd imagine you could run the boat up and down the Big Sue... need to replace props frequently. But if you went with a Jet lower end you could probably do well. Not sure how deep your boat drafts though. That can get you to Deshka, Fish Creek, Alexander Creek, etc.
    Again, someplaces, the Big Sue will sneek up under neath ya!

    Lakes - SURE. Big Lake is very close to your choice of residence. Lake Lucille, Lake Louise... nice lakes. You could run around in there with a boat like that.

    Ocean... I ain't educated on that... but I know Alaska's waters aren't too friendly... maybe someone can help you better there.

    My two cents -- Maybe... depends what you really want to use it for...

  4. #4

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    If you aren't afraid to get a scratch or six on your boat then i would bring it along. boats are quite a bit more expensive here than in minnesota. Lunds are notorious for taking on big water, i wouldnt be afraid of going on the ocean with it if you pay attention to the weather.

  5. #5
    Member zpoehler's Avatar
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    Default

    I wanted to get out in a open area to take some pics in case I do end up selling it, the parking lot of our apt building is too crowded.

    I considered transforming the F115 into a jet and it would cost me $2300 to do it which is out of consideration right now...I'll probably be saying the opposite after I've replaced the lower unit 2 or 3 times.
    As far as the ocean i'd just be taking it out around Seward and Whittier and staying in the bays, i've had it out in some pretty choppy conditions on some of the bigger MN lakes and it can handle its own but being a single console the ride in and out is usually a wet one. I still have a couple months to decide, I want to hold out as long as possible so I can still fish walleyes a couple more months before I leave.

    Thanks for the replies.

    Zach

  6. #6
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default When I moved

    When I moved to Alaska a gentleman on one of the forums gave me this adivce.

    "Don't bring anything with you. (Boat, ATV, Snowgo) Wait until you get here and see what type of toy everyone else is using in your area. There is a reason they are running what they do. It might be water conditions, snow conditions or a brand/model. But there is a reason. Then buy what everyone else has. That way, if you break it, someone knows how to fix it and parts are usually available."

    It has been sound advice.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  7. #7

    Default wave wackers?

    There are no redtail chubs in Alaska. I agree with Daveinthebush. Sell your boat on WalleyeCentral and buy what Alaskans use.

  8. #8
    Member fishnngrinn's Avatar
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    Default

    Good advice from Dave. Once here, if you are like me you will want about four or five different boats. An ocean boat with some creature comforts, a flat bottom river boat with jet for shallow rivers, a drift boat or inflatable for drift fishing, perhaps a canoe for quiet lakes that dont allow motors or for the Swanson River canoe trails. I have seen a drift boat with a motor on Resurrection bay, not highly recommended, but this is Alaska, land of adventurous high risk takers. I have a 16.5 foot flat bottom skiff with 7 foot beam. It provides me with quite a bit of flexibility for ocean and river fishing. Because it is an open boat I have to pay close attention to weather and operate within margins of safety. Also have a 19 ft Grumman with 15 hp and motor lift for more river running. Do lots of research, decide your priorities, then bring lots of boats
    NRA Lifetime Member

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    Member Unalakleet yooper's Avatar
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    I moved up here a year ago January and was wondering the same thing. I had a Lund 2050 Pro-V with a 225 that I ended up selling last fall. The rivers around here would have tore up the boat and lower unit. I ended up picking up a boat with a jet drive motor and have not had any problems. Like was said earlier, look up here before you buy, very good advise.

  10. #10
    New member fishnhuntr's Avatar
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    Default Don't bring it

    Take it from an ex walleye fisherman from SoDak...it's not going to fit your needs up here, although it is a nice lookin Lund. Put up the money, come on up, figure out what kind of fish/fishing you want to target and get you a new rig, that's more fun anyway! luck

  11. #11
    Member zpoehler's Avatar
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    That is some good advice Dave...One of the main reasons I want to bring it with me is that I have a lot of stuff going on this summer and I won't get to fish a whole lot, not enough to justify buying a new boat anyways. If I brought mine up i'd at least have it for the days I could get out. I do have friends that have boats so it won't be a total waste. I'll most likely sell it and eliminate the hassle of getting it up here.

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    Yep i would definetly sell the boat in MN.I grew up in ND and moved here from MN in oct 06.My intentions were to live on the rivers in summer time,any chance that i could get.Well to make a long story short i bought a ocean boat and the girlfreind had a nice 16' crestliner river boat.We took the ocean cruiser out 11 times last summer and had a blast!Basically everyone is right you are going to want atleast 3 boats and the Lund isnt going to one of them,even though its a very nice walleye boat.

  13. #13
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Default

    I don`t know how any one can afford to live in Alaska!!!!
    You need 1/2 a dozen boats, a quad, snomobile, 4X4, camper and a plane to do it right!!!!

  14. #14

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    just curious where in MN you are at? I'm down thata way right now...gonna be here for a bit.

    Dan
    tradbow@hotmail.com Should be here through the eye opener and then some

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Your boat...

    ... looks plenty skookum to me. Good power, nice deep-vee. Electronics. River running would be diificult due to daft, and illegal above the lower bridge on the Kenai, so that is out of the question. But if you want to do lake and salt fishing, you have a good rig.

    People all over Alaska use Lunds. They are excellent boats and can take the rough water. Ask yourself what type of water you really want to spend time on. If lake and saltwater; you're fine. If river; you might sell it and start over.

    Also ask yourself if you can remain satisfied with the boat. Many get the "boat bug" and continually step their way up to mini-yachts, never really satisfied with what they have. But if you are a weekend fisherman, you might want to get a top for it and enjoy what you already own.

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    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    ... looks plenty skookum to me. Good power, nice deep-vee. Electronics.
    Looks good to me too. My boating has been on and arround the Kenai. Plenty of Lunds, though not too many 17'ers being pushed by a 115! Bring it up and tinker with it a bit, sell the 115, buy a 50hp loose the high seats, add a windshield and some canvas. No one would ever know it had been a bass boat!

  17. #17
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    IMO - You need a different boat. IF you decide to bring yours expect to stay off the rivers most of the time unless you want to tear up the prop. There are a few lakes that your boat would be ok in and a couple that your boat would be near perfect for.

    If you bring it, be sure to get it wrapped and protect the bow from rock chips.

  18. #18
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338-06 View Post
    Looks good to me too. My boating has been on and arround the Kenai. Plenty of Lunds, though not too many 17'ers being pushed by a 115! Bring it up and tinker with it a bit, sell the 115, buy a 50hp loose the high seats, add a windshield and some canvas. No one would ever know it had been a bass boat!
    agreed gut the thing and get a 50 jet, it'll be perfect.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  19. #19
    Member zpoehler's Avatar
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    Please do not call my boat a bass boat, it may be a bit overpowered for a walleye boat, but it's still a walleye boat.

    Tradbow i'm located up near Bemidji, one of the best locations in the world for walleye fishing. If you're in that area let me know and I will take you out to try and catch a few walters. zpoehler@yahoo.com

    If I were to bring the boat up i'd probably use it for lakes and the ocean, might buy a smaller boat for the river. It would be hard to find the right boat for all three applications although I know it's possible. I'd rather have a boat I'm not worried about dinging up in the rivers anyways.

    Again, thanks for all the good info and suggestions.

  20. #20
    New member fishnhuntr's Avatar
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    Default let her catch walleye

    Z,

    Having grown up doing what you're doing now and living in AK for 10 years, let her stay and chase marble eye's. You would absolutely NOT want to try "gutting" it and put a 50 jet on that boat, it's too heavy. Your boat is not overpowered either like someone said, my old man has an 18' crestliner with a 150. I think some here just don't realize the weight difference. Outboard jets lose about a 1/3 hp, so a 50 basically equates to a 35, could you imagine having a 35 horse on that boat, let alone in any kind of current? No, I know you can't. The larger bow area, perfect for walleye fishing, won't really get used here, just wasted space. A smaller, self-bailing bow with larger stern is the ticket for salwater. Better for trolling and being anchored up soaking bait/jiggin. Aluminum is the way to go for riverboats as well, just because they're tougher and lighter which works better with outboard jets. She's a nice lookin gal, get your money's worth for her down there and pick your poison when you come up, you'll be much happier.
    Cody

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