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Thread: My call with Canadian customs

  1. #1
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    Default My call with Canadian customs

    I'm still trying to get a straight answer on how much ammo and components I can bring across the border. I called the Canadian Customs number was told 200rnds per person. Then she said I can bring over 5000rnds. The gal I talked with then said I get taxed 5% of ammo cost over 200rnds per person, but she didn't sound too sure. I'm copying and pasting info from their own .pdf file below.

    Explosives Quantity
    Safety Cartridges* 5,000
    Percussion caps 5,000
    Primers for safety cartridge
    cases
    5,000
    Empty primed safety
    cartridge cases
    5,000
    Gunpowder (black powder)
    in canisters of 500 g
    (1.10 pounds) or less and
    smokeless powder in
    canisters of 4,000 g
    (8.82 pounds) or less
    8 kg or 17.66 pounds
    Christmas crackers any quantity
    Model rocket engines 6
    Pyrotechnic distress signals
    and lifesaving devices
    any quantity necessary for
    the safe operation of the
    aircraft, vessel, train, or
    vehicle in which they are
    transported, or for the safety
    of the occupants

    So it looks like I can bring over some powder (17.66lbs in one pound containers), primers (5000), loaded ammo (5000rnds) but I may be taxed on 4600rnds? Does this sound right? There is nothing listed for unprimed cases or projectiles. I'm going to try and contact a border officer and see what they say.

    Any thoughts?


    Mountaintrekker

  2. #2
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    Default

    Dealing with Canadian border people is like dealing with US border people and the TSA weinies, they are not all that knowledgable.

    I look up the rules and try to avoid everything that might cause me problems. That means no guns, no ammo, no extra gasoline, no alcohol, no tobacco, no wolf hides, no grizz mounts, no medications without prescriptions, no buying anything while in Canada!

    I will be carrying my hammer for self defense when we drive through this summer. We built a cabin last summer and I got to be pretty ****ed good with that hammer.

  3. #3

    Default

    When I moved up last year, I let the moving company pack and ship my guns so I didn't have to deal with them at the border. However, the moving company would not handle ammo. I did not call Canadian Customs but I found somewhere on their website that I could transport 200 rounds, so that's what I went with. I counted out 200 rounds of the ammo I wanted to keep and gave the rest away to friends. At the border the Canadian agent asked to see the ammo. He just looked briefly as I opened the box and didn't count. He was more interested in the turkey wing bone call I had in the same box. So that's my experience. Perhaps not much help and I'm sure it just depends on which particular agent questions you as far as how much searching they'll do.

  4. #4
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Back in 99

    Back in 99, I brought 5,000 rounds, or close to it.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  5. #5
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    Default

    It is a crap shoot. One of my brothers had his car disassembled twice. Once in Haines; just pulled him out of the line and with no explanation, began taking his car apart. This want in the winter too. The next time he and his new wife, going to Victoria BC on their honeymoon, were pulled out of line and taken to separate rooms and questioned for four hours, once the goombahs released them, he had to call the rental agency for a new car, and a went through hell regarding the car that was completely disassembled. Like something out of "The French Connection". They just went back to Seattle.

    Just pack the stuff and let your moving company do it for you.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

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  6. #6
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    Default customs

    as a canadian resident i can go anywhere in the US and bring back 5000 rounds a day. I had the border guards on the skagway highway look it up for me. That day i had about 500 rds with me. However I have heard that if you cross at a shared border (with custom officers from the US and Canada in the same building) the US guys will nail you as the patriot act changed the rules and you can not export ammo out of the US? I tend to believe this as after 9/11 I can no longer take a gun of any kind to the US for any reason other than hunting and that takes 6 months of paperwork, Cabelas,Midway or any CO. wont even try to ship any gun related parts up here, and most guys think its because of Canadian law but its not its the export laws of the US. hope this helps

  7. #7
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    Default Transportation of Ammo/Stuff

    Mountaintrekker,

    I'm leaving Alaska for the 'lesser' 48 this summer and need the same answers. Your listed quantities are very similar to what I was told 2 years ago and I got those quantities from a Canadian Port Director. Let me see if I can get any written directive governing this issue.

    I won't tell you where I work!

  8. #8
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    Ok,
    I have the .pdf file from their website. the site is www.cbsa.gc.ca then go to the search tool, go to the publications and forms window and type in document number D-19-13-2 page 9. has the ammo section. I guess I'll call the ATF or U.S. customs and see what the rules are for bringing the stuff back in to the U.S.
    BTW this is friggin nuts! I'm trying to abide by the law and it looks like it depends on the mood at the border? I need to print out the current laws on both sides and highlight everything that pertains to this and have my lawer on retainer just in case.
    I'm just shipping all the guns up so I don't have issues with those. Jeeze, I never thought this would be such a hassle!

    Mountaintrekker

  9. #9
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    I just got off the phone with U.S. customs. The lady had a thick Indian accent and the only thing she was able to tell me was I need to fill out a form 6059B to re-enter. I'm calling the ports of entry directly and see what they say. <sigh>
    Port of entry off the Alcan is 907-774-2252. I just figured I would document all of this in case someone else could use the info.


    Regards,

    Mountaintrekker

  10. #10
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    Default 200 rounds per person

    I came up a year ago and brought seven guns and 400 rounds (200 for my wife and 200 for me)of ammo with no problems. I was told anything more than 200 rounds per person and it was subject to tax.

  11. #11
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    Default New info!

    I talked with U.S. customs up in Alcan (port of entry off of highway). They say you may bring the 5000rnds (subject to Canadian 5% tax) back over, but you need to show receipts that it was purchased in the U. S. and he recommended I "register" it when I bring it in to Canada. I would assume this goes for the rest of the stuff on the list.

    Mountaintrekker

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitroman View Post
    It is a crap shoot. One of my brothers had his car disassembled twice. Once in Haines; just pulled him out of the line and with no explanation, began taking his car apart. This want in the winter too. The next time he and his new wife, going to Victoria BC on their honeymoon, were pulled out of line and taken to separate rooms and questioned for four hours, once the goombahs released them, he had to call the rental agency for a new car, and a went through hell regarding the car that was completely disassembled. Like something out of "The French Connection". They just went back to Seattle.

    Just pack the stuff and let your moving company do it for you.
    We drove all of our stuff through Canada and left the firearms and ammo in the L48 when we moved to Alaska. Then when I flew down for Christmas, I brought $6k worth of guns and ammo back on the plane with me ...Alaska Airlines, no problem.

    When we DID cross into Canada while driving north however, the lady was quite friendly and helpful, and said we could've just brought the stuff with us and filled out the forms when we got to the border ...and I think a $50 charge or something like that.

    Brian

  13. #13
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default

    I was under the impression the $50 Canadian registration fee was per firearm - perhaps someone who has recently paid this fee can clarify this point for me.

  14. #14
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    Default Firearms fee

    I literally just now got off the phone with them concerning transporting my AR-15 through Canada. It's a $50 ONE TIME fee for going through for the firearms. I have a lot of info on this and FORMS saved to my desktop if anyone is interested in REAL INFORMATION concerning transporting guns through Canada. Mountaintrekker, my original comments about this still stand true. Please feel free to PM me and we can chat about it and I can give you some good info. Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by shphtr View Post
    I was under the impression the $50 Canadian registration fee was per firearm - perhaps someone who has recently paid this fee can clarify this point for me.
    $25 for the lot of them. Down load and fill out the form prior to getting to the port, but don't sign until at the port.

    http://www.cfc-cafc.gc.ca/factsheets/visitin_e.asp

    I drag guns across often. Never had a problem.
    Don't bother trying to take handguns. Big no no. Although they have permits for it in some cases.
    I live by the border and cross often, that does make things easier.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whelenator View Post
    I literally just now got off the phone with them concerning transporting my AR-15 through Canada. It's a $50 ONE TIME fee for going through for the firearms. I have a lot of info on this and FORMS saved to my desktop if anyone is interested in REAL INFORMATION concerning transporting guns through Canada. Mountaintrekker, my original comments about this still stand true. Please feel free to PM me and we can chat about it and I can give you some good info. Mark
    We posted at the same time.
    Did I read the forms wrong? I think it said $25 under option 1.

    Your AR-15 is a restricted weapon, that must be the difference in cost.

    http://www.cfc-cafc.gc.ca/factsheets/r&p_e.asp
    Last edited by travelers; 04-17-2008 at 11:33. Reason: added info

  17. #17

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    I just did the trip up to AK in January. Cost me $25 for the 5 long guns I had with me. I didnt bring any ammo though so I cant help you there.

  18. #18
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    Mountiantrekker,
    Don't forget to file out a "Certificate of Registration for Personal Effects Taken Abroad".
    You do that on the US side. It's free.
    You list your guns and there serial #'s.
    Customs form #4457.
    This is so you have proof you took the items out of the US. Without this you could pay duty (if the guns are foreign made) upon re-entry or if they want to be nasty, charged with illegally importing firearms.
    I've never been asked to show this form to the US Customs. But it's free and easy to get.

  19. #19
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    Default Memorandum D19-13-2

    Mountain Trekker,

    Yep, this is the point of reference. I'm hoping to get a 'written' email response as to how to make it as easy as possible. I've still got the question out and waiting for a referral to a particular individual. Usta' be handgun ammo was forbidden, now it appears okay. I've got maybe 2,000 rounds of handloads in various calibers and several hundred more casings, primers, various bullets, your basic amateur reloading 'stuff.'

    When I conversed with Canadian Customs 2 years ago, they were quite amiable about my transporting such a quantity.

    Right now, I plan on shipping my firearms with the moving company, documenting all serial numbers of the guns and the scopes, if applicable, taking photos, and adding insurance if possible to cover the firearms.

    I'll inventory my ammo & such, down to the specific primer count and declare all. I'll ship the empty cases & bullets as they're not HAZMAT. I'll try and get a pre-clearance via this list by emailing.

    Somewhat in defense of the U.S. CBP Officers on our borders, their primary function today is to thwart terrorism and identify other suspicious acts against our nation. Virutally all CBP Officers have a God-given fondness for firearms and appreciate a well-armed society. The volume of CFRs, Memorandums, & Directives they're expected to know & enforce while keeping the traveler happy & content is unbelieveable.

  20. #20
    Member Whelenator's Avatar
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    Default CBP Officers LOVE OF GUNS????

    Quote Originally Posted by cghuntcms View Post
    Mountain Trekker,

    Yep, this is the point of reference. I'm hoping to get a 'written' email response as to how to make it as easy as possible. I've still got the question out and waiting for a referral to a particular individual. Usta' be handgun ammo was forbidden, now it appears okay. I've got maybe 2,000 rounds of handloads in various calibers and several hundred more casings, primers, various bullets, your basic amateur reloading 'stuff.'

    When I conversed with Canadian Customs 2 years ago, they were quite amiable about my transporting such a quantity.

    Right now, I plan on shipping my firearms with the moving company, documenting all serial numbers of the guns and the scopes, if applicable, taking photos, and adding insurance if possible to cover the firearms.

    I'll inventory my ammo & such, down to the specific primer count and declare all. I'll ship the empty cases & bullets as they're not HAZMAT. I'll try and get a pre-clearance via this list by emailing.

    Somewhat in defense of the U.S. CBP Officers on our borders, their primary function today is to thwart terrorism and identify other suspicious acts against our nation. Virutally all CBP Officers have a God-given fondness for firearms and appreciate a well-armed society. The volume of CFRs, Memorandums, & Directives they're expected to know & enforce while keeping the traveler happy & content is unbelieveable.

    cghuntcms, you must be dreaming?? Everyone I know within the last 10 years since I have been in Alaska, that have travelled down through Montana to PCS to the lower 48 somewhere, have had issues with the MONTANA side with customs if they had firearms. These are certified gun nuts that do all the correct paperwork and documentation, plus make sure everything is done right, and the customs guys act like they are terrorists coming across and have given them hell for having "that many guns"... I am talking about guys with 3 or 4 remington 700's, an 870 shotgun, and a mini-14...YEAH, this is on the MONTANA SIDE, NOT CANADA. So, let's not kid ourselves about CBP's love of guns and that they are a bunch of good ole boys. They are far from it.

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