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Thread: New to flyfishing

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    Default New to flyfishing

    Hello I'm new to flyfishing, and I'm wondering the technique to use flies in a nymphing technique. Right now My line and leader are a floating type for dry flies, do I need to switch this to a sinking type to nymph. Any help is helpful, and much appreciated.

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    Member TruBluTex's Avatar
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    I'm relatively new to fly fishing myself but what I for nymphs is either add some wet-fly drops to it and/or add a small bb shot to sink it down. Keeping it on a floating line without switching the line or reel. I'm also a newbie at tying flies and adding a bit of lead-thread to assist in sinking it down.

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    Or use BH nymphs....depending on how fast the water is flowin..

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Catchfish
    Attend my seminar if you live in the valley/Anchorage area. Otherwise feel free too PM.
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    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Fly fishing Alaska - getting started

    Nymphing. Tangles. Location. What I remember about getting started fly fishing in Ak - is tangles. Then nymphing and location.

    Variations in your cast will help open the casting loop to reduce the number of tangles inevitably caused by the weight needed to get your flies down to the fish. Just go and watch fly fishers on a stream, or drop by Title Wave, or another book store to find a book that helps.

    Agree with TruBluTex above though - simple modifications to your gear will get your flies down to the fish. The most common techniques, I believe are called nymph fishing, or streamer fishing. Magazines often describe the techniques, useful to get your fly to the right location. The target fish will often be deep in holes or somehow tucked away in spots which allow them to rest, or watch for food without expending too much energy. These prime spots are valued by fish - and often will hold good fish on repeat visits. Some guys carry several sizes of split shot to adjust to the depth/current speed, others just put on and take off shot. Carry extra shot with you when you go.

    Main thing is to go. Have fun. Watch others. After technique and locations, I think what separates average from better fly fishers is keeping a tight line and detecting the strike. Most novices (I still include myself) miss fish, I am convinced.

    Books I found helpful:
    1. Nymph Fishing, Dave Hughes
    2. No Hatch to Match, Rich Osthoff
    3. Active Nymphing; Aggressive Strategies for Casting, Rigging and Moving Nymphs - Rich Osthoff
    4. Fly Fishing with A.K. - A.K. Best

    Good luck -

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    6xleech
    Yep they do miss lots of strikes, a dropper rig can help with that.
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    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

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    Member RainGull's Avatar
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    Most novices (I still include myself) miss fish, I am convinced.
    Boy I know that's got to be true!
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

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    Default No Sir

    Great Post all:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Hello I'm new to flyfishing, and I'm wondering the technique to use flies in a nymphing technique. Right now My line and leader are a floating type for dry flies, do I need to switch this to a sinking type to nymph. Any help is helpful, and much appreciated.

    Simple Answer is no! For your average Nymph Fishing your standard Floating Fly Line will work for your every day Nymph Fishing on most streams such as Willow, MT Creek, Quartz etc....... Biggger water you may wish to consider something in a sink tipe and or full sink line however as posted by others a little split-shot goes a long way. Water Depth and current strength changes the game some times. Options Options Options.

    Also consider a strike indicator to assit you in seeing strikes while nymphing. I do not use them my-self however starting out they are a great help to many people.

    Rumor has it fish i.e. trout feed under the surface of the water 90 percent of the time under normal i.e. lower 48 fishing in Alaska IMO that increases.

    Tight Lines and Best Wishes

    Blue Moose
    www.bluemooserafting.com

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    Grab a little corky and some split shot and you have everything you need to nymph. Remember just like most dry fly fishing a drag free float is optimal. Use enough lead that your fly is near the bottom. This setup is pretty killer for kings.

    Pinch those barbs and catch and release!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails nymph rig.jpg  
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Alright yeah thanks for the info, I have been trying the split shot the last couple of times, but I keep tangling my line, is there some hints to help me with this.

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    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    Default Casting knots

    Well to be honest without seeing your set-up and watching you cast it would be hard to give the proper advise on correcting your problem with twist and or knots.

    A standard method of weighted nyphm / streamer fishing is high sticking i.e. short leader, rod high up, and fishing reltively close to your location.

    One of your possible problems with twisting could be the amount of weight your trying to utilize, another might be drag created by cross currents causing your line to move faster than your fly beucase of the lack of mending your line and last but not least your casting might be an issue as well.

    Some easy corrections are:

    Always use a direct line of casting while applying the exact same amount of force in both directions back cast and froward cast this action alone will take out most of your wind knots and twisting i.e. your fly line stays on a level plane and keeps your loops tight when false casting.

    Mend your line after your initial cast so that your fly line and your fly are moving at the same speed to avoid drag

    Fish closer to your person. Most people think fly fishing includes always casting as far as you can. This is called Fly Casting sorry folk's! Fly Fishing is keeping your fly in or on the water more than in the air.

    Sorry for rambling! If you happen to be in Fairbanks give me a shout I would be more the happy to spend a couple of hours going over some of the data. " No Strings"

    Richard Mousseau
    www.bluemooserafting.com

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    I'm really thankful for the help and figure it's more a problem with me and not the equipment, and it seems to be true because I can fish within 12 or 15 ft pretty good with a splitshot but any farther than that i'm screwed I appreciate all the help specially since it's hard to help people without watching them. Once again thanks and unfortunately I'm not near fairbanks.

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Are you in school in Anchorage now? Again I'm holding a free seminar you can read about here in this forum, your more than welcome to attend.
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

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    Default Tangles...

    Tangles and wind knots = killers. Amazing how tangled that leader can get isn't it? A miracle like sometimes.

    1. Technique: Years ago, I watched Tony Weaver teach a circle cast at the Great Alaska Sports Show. He could actually keep his flyline in the air - moving his rod around and around in a circle - while he walked or changed direction until he was ready to put the cast down. The open circle keeps the flyline and lure separated - reducing knots.

    It's possible to move the rod in an oblong circle too, and to cast that way, separating the plane of the backcast and the front cast. I used to pull the back cast back over my left shoulder then front cast (normal) off my right. It looked goofy but I quit tangling and it was easy. This is a variation of the belgian cast - read this for more - (http://www.midcurrent.com/articles/t...d_belgian.aspx

    The secret being that the heavy parts of your line (split shot, weighted leeches, etc) can sag all they want because they aren't going to collide with another part of your loop. There are other ways of opening your loop - but it takes some practice. Gradually there'll be fewer tangles and you can start focusing on catching fish. Folks around here do several easy things to reposition the fly upstream (or wherever) without the usual classic fly cast stroke.

    Until then - just things that helped me to consider in some situations:
    2. Cut the hook off. Untangle. Retie. It saves me time when the knots are bad. (I found a "gadget" for wrapping trashed mono on).
    3. Cut the whole tangle off on major trauma cases only - gets costly.
    4. Carry nippers with a needle tool on them. The needle helps on-stream when working tangles out.

    5. Watch instructional videos - Scientific Anglers, Joan Wulff and Mel Krieger were good ones I recall. Watch good casters around here. They are very efficient - their flies stay in the water.

    Nothing wrong with working in small water. A guy named, Donnie Price (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x__5w...eature=related) did a nice Fall trip on the Russian, which isn't big water and he looks like he had a fine time alright. Very doable trip to consider for this Fall. Not that much casting on the clip though.

    Have fun

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    if you are in good nymphing water you won't be casting that far, let the flies dangle below you a bit then flip them back upstream, throw a mend and you're set for another drift. Minimize your back casts and your casting overall and you will have less tangles. Also good technique helps a ton, go to Rick's seminar or book a casting class it will help.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    If you are really feeling green to the sport I highly recommend spending some time in a fly shop... I learn as much or more about technique, gear, flies, and fishing holes from other client el as I do from the guys selling the gear.

    I think that if you have a 7-9 foot leader you should be ok with a floating line, that is they way I do most of mine. Flourocarbon leaders sink like a stone so for a specific sinking leader that is the way to go. They are really abrasion resistant too.

    Be sure to give your fly 2 to 3 feet of space from any weight you might put on, this may be in the regulations but even if it's not it's a good rule.

    I hate casting with weights so if you can avoid it, do. Also I find that painting my flies with head cement or clear finger nail polish gets the air space out and makes them tougher for the fish to hurt. Makes them sink a little better and they just look wet all the time so it's not likely to hurt presentation unless your pattern is supposed to undulate in the water. Hairs ears and scuds work well treated this way.
    River Runnin

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Mel Krieger...

    Just to add to a good thread on basics and learning fly casting.
    Reviewed "The Essence of Flycasting", a Mel Krieger instructional video over the weekend. Excellent learning tool. Two notes for me:

    1. Casting-controlling the tip: The casting variation I use, Mel calls, The Belgian Cast, an oval/elliptical rod tip path, which reduces opportunities for the weighted fly or tippet to tangle with other parts of the line. Very helpful when windy, but I use some degree of an elliptical cast always.

    2. Casting-controlling the power: I frequently overpower the forward cast --applying power too aggressively, "shocking the leader", which breaks up/shatters the loop and would create a tailing loop/wind knot if I didn't use an elliptical cast. Smoother application of power was my 2008 project, but I found old habits kept creeping back in.

    Good review anyway.

    Only a few weeks of winter remain...

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    Member E-K-C's Avatar
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    Default Nymphs

    Hello all:
    in my younger years when I went fishing alot Iwould have to agree with--- BLUE MOOSE--Rumor has it fish i.e. trout feed under the surface of the water 90 percent of the time under normal i.e. lower 48 fishing in Alaska IMO that increases.
    The only thing I didn't like ,was not watching a fish come up and taking what I made to feed him.
    Go short on your casts and you will be in for a surprise at how many fish are around you.
    I call it meat an potatoes fishing because when the hatch is off you still can catch fish....
    I have caught 100s of trout nymphing in the lower 48.
    E-K-C

  19. #19

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    This is a little different rig than has been mentioned before (atleast from what I've read.) This setup is done with the weight on the bottom and flies suspended above it attached to 3-5" tails which allows the flies the float more naturally than an inline setup. Another benefit is that the flies are the first thing the fish sees. Check regs and make sure you can use a 2 fly set-up. I have done ALOT of nymph fishing and have just recently switched to the bottom bouncing rig and I LOVE IT! We did an experiment just last saturday, and I outfished my brother 4 to 1 with this set-up. this rig fishes the exact same way as the other rig, just be sure to keep the flies and weights about 12" apart and dont make your tag ends too long or the flies will tangle together. Don't forget to adjust your indicator when necesary and add weight as needed. This is a good one also for you long time nymphers to learn also.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bouncenymphingB.jpg  

  20. #20

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    If your wondering how to tie the bottom bouncing rig just use your standard tapered or tied leader. I use a 9 ft leader. Thats from the butt to the weights. SO at 7 feet I'll tie in with a double surgeon knot a 18" piece of tippet leaving about a 4" tag, trimming the shorter end. Then repeat with the second piece of tippet. Then tie an overhand knot in the very tail end so your weight won't slip off and your in business.

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