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Thread: 8mm Remington Magnum

  1. #1
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Default 8mm Remington Magnum

    Just curious if anyone on the forum uses a 8mm Remington magnum for hunting.
    About 5 years ago I owned a Remington Model 700 Classic and used it for caribou hunting, I was very pleased with the results. Only ammo I had for the rifle sat on the village store shelves for 20 years before I bought them. There were 10 boxes @ $18.00/box, I vaguely remember that they were 200 grain bullets.
    Never got around to mounting a scope on the rifle since it wore open sights. Spent most of my hunting life shooting with open sights so I didn't mind at all. Only started using a scope back in the mid 1990's. For quite a few years scopes we never seen out here in the villages. Whenever a local hunter showed up on the hunt with a scoped rifle everyone would tease him about his shooting skill and how poor his eyesight must be getting. We would all have a good laugh back in those days. The first time I shot caribou with the 8mm I believe the distance was around 200 paces, I was impressed. Each of the caribou dropped in their tracks instantly. My partner checked the animals and both were shot in the heart. Comparing my 243 Winchester with the same shot placement, caribou would usually do a wobbled knee dance before falling over. My 340 Weatherby with 250 grain Noslers would also lay caribou in their tracks instantly. When I bought my 340 had not planned on using it for caribou, but on that trip I had mistakenly picked up a box of empty 300 Winchester mag brass on my way out the door, so I had no choice but to use my Weatherby. Nothing like shooting game with these larger caliber once in a while, very impressive. Shot placement is still key to dropping them instantly in their tracks.

  2. #2
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Default 8 Mag

    That is my gun of choice. I have shot most of the big game Alaska has to offer with it. Most didn't need the insurance shot.
    Great gun, but kind of heavy. If those bullets are still for sale, buy them. Mt View wants $78 a box for mine.
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    I purchased a 8mm rem mag last year. My brother used on a caribou hunt with great success. I've got 220 gain ammunition for it and the groups are impressive, as long as I do my part. I'm going to try and use it on a couple hunts this year if I can wreste it from him.

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    I did buy all 10 boxes at the time, ended up giving the rifle and ammo to my cousin as a gift for helping me out when I really needed some help. Kinda wish I hung on to it, since he never hunts with it. He said he is saving it for our nephew who claimed it when he was just a small boy. Lately I have been thinking about buying another 8mm Remington or possibly having one built. Kinda like the idea of having one built, probably end up doing that. Yep, the 8mm Remington magnum is a good hunting cartridge. I would really like to own one again. I was impressed.

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nukalpiaq View Post
    ... sat on the village store shelves...

    I have found that ammo in some of the smallest villages. Somebody, sometime, must have thought it was going to be a popular round.

    Good luck on the hunt
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  6. #6

    Default I've owned one since 1984

    I shot everything Alaska has to off with it except muskox, bison, and polar bear. It is a great rifle and if I was going to own 1 rifle for Alaska, that would be the one. I still have mine, but it doesn't get out much anymore. I still have bullets and reload time to time. Still have a box or 2 of those 250 grain barnes bullets that I reload. Those bullets would pack a serious punch! I am very sentimental to that rifle as that was my first hunting rifle and it went everywhere to me. I am thinking about having it reworked and possibly taking it to Africa with me on the next trip. It is deserving of a trip to the Dark Continent!

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Default Wikipedia

    Here is what I found on Wikipedia:

    The 8 mm Remington Magnum's parent case is the .375 H&H Magnum....

    The 8 mm Remington Magnum was intended to compete with the .300 Weatherby Magnum and .338 Winchester Magnum....I didn't know that.

    Even though the 8 mm Remington Magnum has never been very popular, one would have to look long and hard before coming up with a better cartridge for use on elk, moose, and larger African antelope...I had a feeling.

    Loaded with light, short and soft nosed 8mm bullets the 8mm Remington Magnum can be used on remarkably small game. Loaded with heavy, long and hard (solid copper) bullets the 8mm Remington Magnum offers enough velocity derived power to penetrate heavy and dangerous game. Can you say pole ax?

    I guess that's why I have been packing this thing around for 25 years.
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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    I think that Remington lost interest in the 8 MM about the time they came out with Ultra Mag. .300 and .338.

    Way cooler name probably a better seller as well.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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  9. #9

    Default

    The 8mm sounds like a good round, but checking the ballistics the 300 RUM can push a 200 gr bullet a little faster and the 338 RUM can push a 225 gr even faster.

  10. #10

    Default no animal will know the difference

    in the velocity. The 8mm mag is in my opinion one of the finest rifles one can pick for Alaska if someone wanted only "one" rifle. I used it for 17 years on everything that I could shoot at and it NEVER failed me once. I would probably reload with a 200 grain tsx if I was to use it again. Like I said, I think when I go back to Africa, it will make the trip with me. I went on so many trips with my partner and I, that my partner said I couldn't sell it. If something happens to me, it will become his rifle. Funny how the sentimental value of a rifle can be so high.

  11. #11
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Been giving it some thought and I think I am gonna start looking for a Remington 700 Classic w/iron sights in 8mm Rem mag. The rifle that I used to own shot pretty well for me when I hunted with it. Also found a box of Remington Premier Safari Grade 200 Gr, Swift A-Frame PTD SP that I bought at Mt View Sports Center for $46.95/bx. Probably can't find prices like that in Anchorage anymore.

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    Default 8mm Remington Magnum

    I've been using a Remington model 700 in 8mm magnum as my primary large game rifle for over 25 years. One shot kills on Elk, Caribou, Moose, Black Bear and Grizzly (2 shots for 1 grizzly). I found that none of the factory loads are acceptable. I believe that Remington can still supply empty brass at reasonable cost, I'm still rotating through my original 240 brass. Most of my use has been with 200 gr Nosler partition bullets and 78 grains of IMR 4831. In my rifle that chronos at about 3070 fps and is extremely accurate. Although the 8mm Rem mag is a necked down .375 H&H, Remington also blew the case out for 15% grater powder capacity. The only change I made to the normal model setup was to float the barrel, neck size the brass and seat the Nosler bullets 50 thousands from the lands. Groups are just under 1 min. I'm pretty much done with big game hunting, so this rifle will soon go to my grandson who is attending UofA in Fairbanks.

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    The .325 is another version of the 8mm Remington Magum (another 8mm cartridge), except that it's is a lot shorter than the 8mm Remington. The 8mm Magnum is a fine cartridge, but quite long, which in turn requires the use of a Magnum long-action (longer than the .30-06 cartridge).

    The .338WM with its short action (similar to the .30-06), and a greater selection of bullet weights and designs, achieves similar ballistics to the 8mm Rem Magnum. Maybe because bullet selection (don't really know), and because the .338WM has proven itself as an all around cartridge in elk, moose, bear country for nearly 25 years ahead of the 8mm Remington Magnum, the later has not been as popular and the former.

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    I bought one when they first came out in 1977. Most game was deer sized , i also have a 340 wby . They are close as to killing power. Three shot groups are a clover leaf at 100 yds, i had it freefloated , action beded.This is great caliber that wasn't popular, you will never regret owning one!

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    I too think the 8mm Mag is an outstanding round. Its to bad it never really caught on. I think if when it came out Remington, Federal or Winchester came out with some ammo that would live up the round it would have caught on. I think the round was great but you had to hand load to really get the performance out of it that it was capeable of.

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    I am curious if there is much difference from the 325 WSM and the 8mm Rem mag? I looked at the 325 wsm when I was buying a new rifle. I compared it to the 338 win mag, 300 win mag/WSM and the 300 Ultra mag. My conclusion was to buy the 338 if I wanted the larger bullet vs the 325. I bought the RUM in a fit of testosterone poisoning without regret.

    I now have the 300 win as well, and can't see much wrong with it either. It is nicer on my shoulder than the RUM. How is the recoil for the 8mm/325 WSM? I can shoot my buddies 338 win mag all right, so I assume the .325 class will be fine too.

    There is probably more bullets now with the 325 WSM out there. Maybe the 8mm rem mag will make a come back?

  17. #17

    Talking 8 mm brass

    I have 1 box of brass if any body needs it, in wasilla

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daved View Post
    I am curious if there is much difference from the 325 WSM and the 8mm Rem mag? ...There is probably more bullets now with the 325 WSM out there. Maybe the 8mm rem mag will make a come back?
    IMHO the bullet thing is exactly what killed the 8mm RM the first go around. Most of the component bullets back then were produced for 8x57 velocities not 8mmRM ones. We have great 8mm bullets today but I doubt the 8mmRem will ever make a comeback.

    The 8mmRM was never loaded to its full potential. It has the case capacity to fling bullets much faster than factory ballistics and the case begs for a heavier 8mm bullet. The dimensionally much smaller 325 WSM matches the "Big 8" very closely with available weights.

    On my list of things I'll probably never see is a "Big 8" shooting loooonnng 250gr+ bullets to the full potential of the case. But I'd sure love to have one!

  19. #19
    Member jkb's Avatar
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    The .358 Shooting times Alaskan (STA) is another great cartrige based on the 8 MM and it never gained much popularity but what a thumper.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    IMHO the bullet thing is exactly what killed the 8mm RM the first go around. Most of the component bullets back then were produced for 8x57 velocities not 8mmRM ones. We have great 8mm bullets today but I doubt the 8mmRem will ever make a comeback.

    The 8mmRM was never loaded to its full potential. It has the case capacity to fling bullets much faster than factory ballistics and the case begs for a heavier 8mm bullet. The dimensionally much smaller 325 WSM matches the "Big 8" very closely with available weights.

    On my list of things I'll probably never see is a "Big 8" shooting loooonnng 250gr+ bullets to the full potential of the case. But I'd sure love to have one!
    Not just bullets. Suitable powders weren't available back then to make the most of the big case. Lots of excess space. Things are different now.

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