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Thread: How far do you sight in?

  1. #1

    Default How far do you sight in?

    Im specifically looking for 30.06 black bear hunting sighting in yard ammount- I'm thinking around 150?

    However that makes the thread very limited so why not have some fun and say how far you yard in for carribou, moose, elk, brownies, sheep, goat etc etc

  2. #2
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    I like using a 200 yard zero for most centerfire hunting applications.

  3. #3

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    How far you sight in depends on a few things other than the game you are pursuing. First, what is the trajectory or *flatness* of your load. Next is, what range do you think you will normally be shooting. i.e., point blank/short range in brush and forest or long range, mountain or plains, or.... somewhere in between. I sight in zero at 250 yds here in Montana and can hold on up to 300 - 350 yds without my bullet going more than 3" high or low. When I got my first rifle in PA with iron sights, a 243, I sighted in at 100 yds and most shots were less than 50 yds.

    If you're shooting short range, sight in at 100 yds, if long range 200 - 250 yds, depending on the trajectory of your bullet.

    Happy Hunting

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    I generally tell hunters who ask me this to sight in at 2" high at 100 yards. I realize how dorky that sounds sometimes but I say it that way because most of us only get to sight in at 100 yard ranges. Another factor for that is the velocity of the cartridge. Most will be about 2800 fps and 2" high at a 100 will give a zero at about 200 yards plus or minus a few yards. Some calibers are real barn burners and and will be zeroed at a bout 240 otehrs will be a bout 180 yards.

    If you have a specific set up where you will be a known distance form your likely target then sight in for that distance. Sometimes an inch can be a lot as is the case for baiting leopard. You should sight in for zero at the known distance. With rifles in the 30-06 class and this "normal" velocity range of about 2800 to 3000 fps, I would use a general duty sighting of +2" at 100 or a 200 yard zero, for anything and everything and learn to hold or to click adjust the scope for all longer ranges.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Member Bear Buster's Avatar
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    I normally sight in Most of my high powered rifles at 200 yards except my 45-70 I sight in at 150 yards. Practice shooting multiple targets randomly between 50 and up to 500 yards to be highly proficient with the mil dot scopes.

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Triangulation. use the method developed by the military. 1,000 inches (27 yards) usually works out vary well for most rifles.

    What you do is set up your target at 27 yards. move the target back to whatever distance say at 200 yards and see how far off you are. For instance, with a .30 caliber, 180 grain bullet@ 2700 fps will put you on center again at 227 yards. I know it's and old time method used 60 years or more ago.

    A few of the old loading manual from the 1960's used to give you this information.

    Anyway, it has worked for me for a long time. If your bored, give it a try, you might be surprised. I remember I was the first time I tried it.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    I do a couple of things. I almost always sight in for 300 yards if its a 300 mag or the like.

    I will probably sight my 30-06 for 250 yards (2.5" high at 100) with my 160 GS customs.

    I am going to sight my 500S&W Handi-rifle for 50 yards like I do my pistols.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  8. #8
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    I may change the 30-06 160 GS custom to 2.8 inches at 100 yards for a 275 zero. Numbers look good.

    Range.....Drop...........Velocity.......Energy
    (yds)......(in)...............................(ft• lbs)
    0 ........ -1.5.............2953.1.........3097.8
    100 .......2.8.............2859.9.........2905.2
    200........2.9............ 2768.1 .........2721.7
    300..... -1.6..............2677.7..........2547.0
    400......-10.9............2589.0..........2381.0
    500 .....-25.4 ........2501.9.............2223.4
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  9. #9

    Question

    Holes are created by energy?

  10. #10

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    I guess you could say energy makes the holes.

    Anyone doing the point blank thing?

  11. #11

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    Big Al,

    Ya learn something new everyday! I just did anyway. I am going to put that to use!

    Thanks

  12. #12

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    Big Al,
    Really slick. You're saying, if you are zeroed at 27, you will be zeroed at 227?

  13. #13

    Default 30 06 sight in

    Fishwacker-I have to agree with Murphy, with most loads in 2700-2900 fps range, using 165-180 grain spitzers, 2 inches high at 100 will put you pretty well dead on at 200 and about 8-10 inches low at 300. So you can hold dead on out to about 230 yards and only adjust slightly by holding over out to 300.

    Best advise I can give is practice, and not just off the bench but in the positions you will be shooting from in the field. A 22 works great for this and is cheap to boot.

  14. #14

    Default Works

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    Triangulation. use the method developed by the military. 1,000 inches (27 yards) usually works out vary well for most rifles.

    What you do is set up your target at 27 yards. move the target back to whatever distance say at 200 yards and see how far off you are. For instance, with a .30 caliber, 180 grain bullet@ 2700 fps will put you on center again at 227 yards. I know it's and old time method used 60 years or more ago.

    A few of the old loading manual from the 1960's used to give you this information.

    Anyway, it has worked for me for a long time. If your bored, give it a try, you might be surprised. I remember I was the first time I tried it.
    It's worked for me for years. Good thing about this way is at 25-27(lots of ranges only have 25 yard berms) yards you can zero faster saving ammo and then move out to hunting ranges. Unless 25 yards is your hunting range.
    Then practice , practice,practice, from all positions; unless you plan on carrying a bench with you !!
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Yes so often I have told this to fellow shooters. When they try it, they seem to be of the opinion that a light just turned on for them.

    A part of this is the old idea of trust but verify. What I like to do is after I'm sure that I'm on with my sight-in, I pick up the rifle and have fun breaking rocks off hand. There is just something about watching a rock splatter that is satisfying.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  16. #16
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Wink Interesting...but please clarify.

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    Triangulation. use the method developed by the military. 1,000 inches (27 yards) usually works out vary well for most rifles.

    What you do is set up your target at 27 yards. move the target back to whatever distance say at 200 yards and see how far off you are. For instance, with a .30 caliber, 180 grain bullet@ 2700 fps will put you on center again at 227 yards. I know it's and old time method used 60 years or more ago.

    A few of the old loading manual from the 1960's used to give you this information.

    Anyway, it has worked for me for a long time. If your bored, give it a try, you might be surprised. I remember I was the first time I tried it.
    Ok, I see a lot of "27" in this... I though for sure you took the "27"yards from the fact that you had a bullet that traveled "27"00 fps. And then you added the "27" to the 200 yards to get your zero.

    Sorry for the ignorance, but would a 3100fps bullet zero at 31 yards and 231 yards...or would it still be 27yds and 227yds?

    Thank you in advance!
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

  17. #17
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    Yes, Al's right about the 1000" zero.

    But before we go falling all over ourselves about this 1000 inch sight in there are a couple of things that can make a big difference. The height of the sights or scope above the line of bore is pretty important here. I believe tha 1000" target we used for the old fashioned M-16 gave us a 300 yard zero with the little 55 grain ball ammo. Generally this 25 or 27 yard sight in gives about a 300 yard zero for the M-16 but will likely be 200 yards with normal hunting and 1.5" scope hight, depending on sight height and velocity and of course that little BC thingy.

    The bullet crosses the line of sight (LOS) the first time at about 25 yards and again out yonder some where when it falls past the line of sight (The zero range). The barrel is slightly pointed up when we shoot and the line of sight is level, gravity then pulls the bullet down the scope adjusment moves the line of sight up (for down adjustment) and down (for up adjustment). Another consideration for sighting in out at greater ranges, beyond 300 yards the highest point that the bullet will be above the line of sight (this is called the maximum ordinate or max.ord., M.O.) This is not the mid range trajectory for it is not at mid range. This max ord will be about 2/3rds of the way to the sight in range. (more or less depending one velocity and yeah, that's right you guessed it, BC)

    If we sight in for about 2" high at a hundred, max ord will be about 2.5" at about 130 yards and zero at about 200 then the point where it is 2.5" low, say about 240 yards will make it our point blank range (PBR) for a 5" target area. Some like to use a maximum (PBR) based on a certain size target area. A 300 yard point blank range with a 6" target will have a max ord at +3" and a drop below line of sight of -3" at the range limit of 300 yards. This 300 yard zero would make sense for a 300 RUM or 300 Dakota, or similar but not for a 308 Win because the max ord would be too high. We might care about M O if the target shows up at 180 yards with a 300 yard zero.

    {I didn't run these numbers, this is just a generalization about certain calibers, distances, and drop figures. Fell free to run your programs and post all the exact mumbers you want.}

    New terms for today;
    ZERO
    LOS
    MO
    PBR
    POI
    POA

    (Quiz next week)
    Last edited by Murphy; 04-13-2008 at 10:36.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  18. #18
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Default Thanks Murphy...

    Now I am all confused...

    Maybe we can meet at the range, compare Dakota's, and then maybe try to make some sense of what you just said to this rookie.
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

  19. #19

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    Fishwhacker, here is a great online ballistics calculator (IMHO). You can plug in all the variables and get a good picture of your trajectory, including your first zero point.

    I like Al's idea and was thinking of doing just that while working up my loads and borescoping new scope. It's a good way to save powder and bullets and accomplish a couple of things at one time. Of course I would fine tune the sighting at the longer distance.

    http://www.biggameinfo.com/index.asp...2fbalcalc.ascx

  20. #20
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Wow...thanks for the link MontanaRifleman
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

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