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Thread: Length of Pull

  1. #1

    Default Length of Pull

    Does anyone have any ideas about how to tell if the length of pull is correct? This is something that I have never figured out, but I know my rifle's stock seems too short for me.

  2. #2

    Default

    Sounds like you have it figured out to me.

  3. #3
    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    Yeah I agree with hunter, if it feels wrong then it is wrong. It should feel good to you.

  4. #4
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    Default

    I have read the fallowing. (take with a grain of salt, I can not remember where I read it)

    1. Hold your elbow at a 90 degree bend.
    2. Hold your wrist and figures straight.
    3. Bend your trigger finger 90 degrees like you would on the trigger.
    4. Measure from where your trigger finger would touch the trigger, to the inside of you elbow. That should be your length of pull.


    I measure myself at 13 3/4" to 14 1/4" depending on exactly how I hold my arm and if I push the end of the tape measure into my arm. My rifle measures 14" and is good in a thin shirt but tends to hang up on a heavy winter coat. So this method seems to work for me, though I would shorten some for a rifle that needed to come to shoulder quickly in winter months.

    I would be interested what others think on this method of measuring.

  5. #5
    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    I also would like to see a definitive metod for measuring this. It seems to be a closely held secret by custom gun and stock makers

    I read an article about David Tubb (a longe-range shooting champ), where he said that he could properly fit a AR-15 to somebody and they would be able to hit a 10" target at 200yds-without any kind of sights! Of course, he didn't explain how he did it.

  6. #6
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Checking for LOP at the house with a T shirt on, may not be the same as when you wear the same as when you have all your hunting garb on.

    How do I know this? I put a lot of recoil pads on, I put all the pads on my own guns, I did the checking wearing a T shirt. I found that when I hunt here in Alaska, my first layer is a T shirt (got that one right), second layer is my long handles. Next layer is a heavy wool shirt, then comes my water proof hunting parka.

    Do you see where I'm going with this?
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  7. #7

    Default

    I just added a slip-on recoil pad and gained 3/4" -1". Feels better.

    Thanks for the help.

    P.S If I had posted this 3 hours eariler, i could have gotten an answer like this:

    "Any post neanderthal knows that LOP is a function of the off-axis radius of the inverse function of the square of the humerus plexus.........

  8. #8

    Default OK

    Quote Originally Posted by jorel77 View Post
    I just added a slip-on recoil pad and gained 3/4" -1". Feels better.

    Thanks for the help.
    Now you know your approx. LOP;consider this. If the rifle you put the slip-on recoil pad on has a wooden stock. The recoil pad can damage the finish if left over a period of years.
    Take the rifle to the range and if the pad seems to help your shooting, just have a R3-limbsaver installed.
    Be sure to wear the cloths you would be wearing to hunt in as clothing thickness will change LOP, somewhat.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  9. #9

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    Brav01,

    That's a good idea. I have a fiberglass (I guess) stock that the pad won't bother.

  10. #10

    Default Righty-o

    Quote Originally Posted by jorel77 View Post
    Brav01,

    That's a good idea. I have a fiberglass (I guess) stock that the pad won't bother.
    The slip-on should be fine with a synthetic stock as they are moulded of a high density polymer.
    But while it's still cool enough take your coat and rifle to the range and test it out. JMO
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bandhmo View Post
    I have read the fallowing. (take with a grain of salt, I can not remember where I read it)

    1. Hold your elbow at a 90 degree bend.
    2. Hold your wrist and figures straight.
    3. Bend your trigger finger 90 degrees like you would on the trigger.
    4. Measure from where your trigger finger would touch the trigger, to the inside of you elbow. That should be your length of pull.


    I measure myself at 13 3/4" to 14 1/4" depending on exactly how I hold my arm and if I push the end of the tape measure into my arm. My rifle measures 14" and is good in a thin shirt but tends to hang up on a heavy winter coat. So this method seems to work for me, though I would shorten some for a rifle that needed to come to shoulder quickly in winter months.

    I would be interested what others think on this method of measuring.
    I measured my arm as you suggested, 14.5 inches, then measured my rifle after I added a recoil pad: 14.5 inches. The rifle feels better, so your idea seems good to me.

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