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Thread: Tidal pool edibles

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default Tidal pool edibles

    Now that spring may actually be around the corner and I have a boat I was wondering besides clams what are some of your favorite tidal wild edibles? I've herd of folks finding abalone during very low tides what have been some of your favorite finds for dinner from our shores? Personally I like blue mussels and have had some tasty chitons.
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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    When I was a kid, Dad and I would eat sea urchin eggs. I cannot remember for certain, but I think we ate them raw.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Rock scallops and abalone are great to find in SE. There are also a few beaches around here where we can get geoduc in the minus tides.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Lotsa mussels...

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    Now that spring may actually be around the corner and I have a boat I was wondering besides clams what are some of your favorite tidal wild edibles? I've herd of folks finding abalone during very low tides what have been some of your favorite finds for dinner from our shores? Personally I like blue mussels and have had some tasty chitons.
    ... across K-Bay. Try China Poot or the entrance to Halibut Cove Lagoon. Bear in mind that mussels are the last to let go of PSP.
    You really have to watch the bottom on a fiberglass boat too for beach combing. I like glass boats for stability and ride, but prefer aluminum for beachability.

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Sayak you just named my number two fear, beaching in a fiber glass boat! I know it can be done safely but most of the shoreline I've seen around here is way too rocky for my tastes. I would have preferred a smaller metal hulled boat but this is what I could afford and I could probably get my money back tomarow on it by selling just the motor, I think my family will love our little runabout. BTW I'm dying for a break in the weather so I can work on her, purple metal flake with starbursted fore deck and roof of the deck house. Were leaning toward naming her "the purple people eater."
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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    Rock scallops and abalone are great to find in SE. There are also a few beaches around here where we can get geoduc in the minus tides.
    Rock scallops you say? Interesting very interesting, I might just have too bring my free diving stuff along on a trip or two.
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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    Rock scallops you say? Interesting very interesting, I might just have too bring my free diving stuff along on a trip or two.
    Very delicious too! You do have one problem while eating them, that is keeping the juices from running down your chin.

  8. #8
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default No fear!

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    Sayak you just named my number two fear, beaching in a fiber glass boat! I know it can be done safely but most of the shoreline I've seen around here is way too rocky for my tastes. I would have preferred a smaller metal hulled boat but this is what I could afford and I could probably get my money back tomarow on it by selling just the motor, I think my family will love our little runabout. BTW I'm dying for a break in the weather so I can work on her, purple metal flake with starbursted fore deck and roof of the deck house. Were leaning toward naming her "the purple people eater."
    Plenty of beaches on K-Bay are beachable. Maybe HomerDave can give you a list. Always good to have someone in the bow to spot for you, or maybe you could get a little raft to throw on your hardtop, and paddle in from your anchored boat. But don't wait for the tide to run in places like China Poot, or you'll never be able to pa............dd............le ............to your boat!

    By the way, what's your #1 fear of glass boats?

  9. #9
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Well this is going to sound ridiculus so let me premise it be giving you some back ground. My father had several boats while I was growing up and we spent allot of time on the great lakes. I've piloted in 12 foot seas, navigated in fog and darkness around some very rocky and dangerous shores but I've never piloted in salt were there is a tide. Lake superior will get 10 foot storm surges but it's normal tide is not noticeable (apparently there is a tidal difference on the order of a few inches).

    My fear is I'll forget to account for the tide or do so wrongly and run my poor old boat up on the rocks. Or I'll beach us to go camping and do to my inexperience with tides the boat will depart with out us! I know kinda silly but now that I'm a Dad all kinds of worries enter my mind. I'd be just as concerned with a metal hull but there is a world of difference between kayaking salt and power boating salt, I'm a big strong guy but I don't think I could drag the "purple people eater" up above high tide line!
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    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  10. #10

    Default Hey Rick,

    I saw something in Cabela's catalog called a "keelguard" or something along those lines. It's a hard plastic or rubber tape (thick) with an adhesive on one side to stick to your keel from the bow on towards the stern; they come in different colors. Kinda pricey but I'd have one if I had a fiberglass boat. As the tide ebbs, the boat will come to rest (and all it's weight) on the keel first. Having that first line of protection will help to keep the gelcoat from getting chipped, scratched.
    Just a thought,
    Jim

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default Rick P

    I forgot to add, there is a little book out there called "Edible? Incredible!"

    by Marjorie Furlong & Virginia Pill.

    I believe it is not published anymore, but can be ordered through some used book sites. I picked up mine in a used book store.

    It is a reference guide for saltwater sealife and onto the dinner table. It covers most everything you'll ever find in those tide pools and on the beach.

    Very Helpful!

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    Member akcowgirl's Avatar
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    Just a hint.
    I grew up cross the bay from homer running boats back and forth and commercial fishing all over the bay. Watch for rocks even on a beach that look great. I always put someone in the bow to watch even though I know a lot of the beaches around here like the back of my hand. It is better to be safe than sorry. As for the tide, if it is going out you have to be really careful to watching the boat the whole time to make sure it does not go dry. If the tide is coming in then you will want to tie it off and keep pulling it in so that it does not go sideways to the beach and get pounded up the beach by the rollers. If you are nervous the first time you might think about going out early in the morning and plan on being back before the day breeze comes up then you are not trying to contend with both the tide and the wind. There are some nasty tide rips in Kachemak Bay that can be really fun when the tide is ebbing against the wind.

    PS. My favorite are Mussels to.

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