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Thread: A little overprotective

  1. #1
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    Default A little overprotective

    My 10 month old Chessie is getting a little big for his britches. He is beginning to snap at people who either walk in the door or are coming up the steps to the door. The regulars and kids he won't bother, but adult men are hard pressed to make it through. Once inside the house he is their best friend. Kids get barked at but an excited bark and licks.

    I'd hate to have to put him down if he bites someone. I'm going to try a shock collar in some set-up situations with friends who are strangers to the dog. But I'd be happy to hear some other suggestions from all of you wise fellers here.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2

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    I wouldn't use the collar in this situation. Practice with friends. Dog on lead, foot on the other end of the tight lead. Sit. (and make sure he does it.)
    If he goes for your friend, keep the leash tight and re-inforce sit. If you don't think he will go for you, I would even grab his muzzle and tell him "No!"

    Collar might make the problem worse as the dog might think the person coming in is causing this shock.

  3. #3
    Member Wombat's Avatar
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    Thumbs up 2nd

    I second LastFrontierLabs. I was dealing with a situation not unlike your's. A friend told me to do it and it worked very well.

    Wombat

  4. #4
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    Default

    he doesn't do this when I or wife is near, but especially while he is tied out and we are in the house. he has no issues with strangers, dogs, etc while we are near him.

    For example I heard a commotion while in the bathroom and ran upstairs to find the dog growling and snapping at one of my wife's cousins that had walked in. I yelled and he sat down, but continued to growl until I spanked him. he then got some pets from the guest and laid down.

    I'll try that tonight, but I bet nothing happens while I'm there, unless the dog is between my 2yr/old and who ever is coming up the steps

  5. #5

    Default Chessies are unique

    I had a Chessie (he crossed the bridge about 6 yrs ago) and he also would growl at anyone that came into the house if he was already in the house. If I knew company was coming I would put RJ out then bring him in later and he would be fine. Otherwise I made sure the doors were locked so nobody could enter the house without my knowledge and surprise RJ. Chessie's are a challenge - if you google up chessie sites you will read one story after another. I have never seen a Chessie that was not very protective of "their domain". They are very smart dogs and quickly figure out who is in charge you or them. If they figure out they are the Boss you are in deep trouble. You have to set the boundaries and that you are the BOSS for Chessies from day one- they grow quick one day they are a cute brown puppy and the next day they are Kujo-lol They were loved & cherished by the Ole Tyme Duck hunters on the East Coast (MD area) because they would fiercely protect the boat, decoys and game of their master from all comers. I have had easier dogs to train and live with over the years but none were as loyal and devoted as RJ. He had his shortcomings (as do I) but once I understood where he was coming from I was able to train him to be a good companion, housedog and hunter. Go to a few chessie sites - join a forum or two - you should learn a lot - For one you will learn that you don't own the only " Chessie with an Attitude"

  6. #6
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    I'm a chessie guy, currently have two. What you describe is very typical. I would also be concerned about using the shock collar in this situation, in case he thinks the person entering your home is the cause of the pain. Not saying I wouldn't try it, but not when granny is at the door. I tolerate this behavior to a certain extent(barking & growling) but any sign of escalation and I drop the hammer on them, full on wrestling match until they submit totally, then ignore them for an hour or two. You would be suprised how sensitive chessie's really are, the ignoring is probaly more hurtful than the physical punishment. All my friends accept that they are going to bark when you show up, but if I say "come in" they will and the dogs may huff & puff a little bit but they chill out quick. I know the protective streak is a major issue with chessie's, but if you contain them, it's kind of comforting at times. My wife and I were at Home Depot in Anchorage a few years back and my wife took our chessie male over to a secluded grassy area to let him do his buisness. A soon as she got there she noticed a man coming across the parking lot from along ways off. She kept an eye on him and soon noticed he was making a bee line towards her, and she got a little concerned. When he got closer she really got concerned as the guy looked the part of a total scum bag. He came right up to with in 10' of her and she shortened the leash just to imply that the dog might be protective. The man stopped and looked at her and said "brothers got teef" and she looked down and saw our chessie displaying his, but not making a sound. The man turned and walked away. We still laugh hard about that one. Good luck. If it comes down to it there is a chessie rescue organization if you feel like you just can't keep him.

    KK

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