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Thread: Beyond the spawn...

  1. #1
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    Default Beyond the spawn...

    Many persons consume fish roe and consider it quite the treat. Roe caviar is big business, and many in AK delight in making their own. Enough said.

    Now for the flip side; salmon sperm.

    I remove the two packs from the buck and simply marinate them in a little salted water.
    When I have my smoker at the ready for a load of salmon fillets, I will add these in.

    The result?

    It will be a an amber colored pack that has firmed up. Sliced thin and seved on a water cracker it makes an unbelieveable appetizer. It is rich in taste, absolutely, and with a flavor of its own.

    If you are into fish, and like smoked product, give this one a try the next time you blow your alder smoke...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskanAuthor View Post
    Many persons consume fish roe and consider it quite the treat. Roe caviar is big business, and many in AK delight in making their own. Enough said.

    Now for the flip side; salmon sperm.

    I remove the two packs from the buck and simply marinate them in a little salted water.
    When I have my smoker at the ready for a load of salmon fillets, I will add these in.

    The result?

    It will be a an amber colored pack that has firmed up. Sliced thin and seved on a water cracker it makes an unbelieveable appetizer. It is rich in taste, absolutely, and with a flavor of its own.

    If you are into fish, and like smoked product, give this one a try the next time you blow your alder smoke...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com
    How do you prepare your Roe? I have eaten bass, bream, trout, catfish roe fried, but never Salmon.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Default Out with the eggs...

    Salmon roe can be prepared in a variety of ways that range from dusting whole packs in flour and deep frying, to taking them apart in cold water rinse and then salting to present as caviar.

    I prefer the latter and use them as condiments and garnishes. Orange eggs sprinkled on top of fettuchine with a white sauce is a classic example of the reach of the roe...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

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    Member AKGUPPY's Avatar
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    Default

    Gawd, eating salmon sperm, that just ain't right!

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    Default Careful!

    Quote Originally Posted by AKGUPPY View Post
    Gawd, eating salmon sperm, that just ain't right!
    Just don't eat any roe first!

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    Default I know, sounds 'kinda sick...

    Trust me.
    It sounds worse than it truly is.
    Smoked salmon sperm is quite delicious.

    I don't know of anyone who does this; I simply came up with it.

    They eat cod tongues in the Northeast.
    They eat mullet gizzards in the South.

    I'm waiting to hear the take on fried Halibut liver...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

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    Question you "simply came up with it"?

    jack whelan's book "smoking salmon and trout", available at nearly every supermarket check-out stand up here (hey, did i see your book there too?) has an entire chapter devoted to smoking both "hard" (eggs) and "soft" (milt) roes.
    pretty good book, one of the standards to consult for recipe guidelines when one is learning to smoke fish. surprised you have not seen it!
    btw, i tried smoked & BBQ "soft roe"... didn't care for it.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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    Default And I thought tapeworms would be bad....

    Just don't eat any roe first!
    Gives a whole new meaning to the term "salmon belly"

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    Default A word of caution...

    I'm waiting to hear the take on fried Halibut liver
    Halibut liver sounds very intriguing, and I'm sure that I'll be playing with some when I get up there. Monkfish liver is being bandied about as the "new foie gras" (with good reason) and I'd like to see how halibut liver measures up.

    A point of caution is that fish livers are *very high* in your fat soluble vitamins such as A, D, and K. These vitamins is high doses can be toxic, as they are stored in fat cells (lipocytes), rather than being metabolized and excreted like water soluble vitamins such as B and C. Halibut liver in particular is very high in A and D, the most toxic of these vitamins.

    Having said all that, cases of hypervitamintosis from natural foods are extremely rare. I did find this this case:

    "In 1969 some Dutch fishermen caught a very large halibut off the coast of Norway. The liver of the fish was large enough to feed 11 of them, one even ate about 2/3 of a pound. All of them became nauseous, their skin turned red and swollen, and the next morning their skin was peeling off in sheets. They were all suffering from an overdose of Vitamin A (hypervitamintosis A). The one who ate 2/3 pound of the halibut liver ingested the equivalent of 2,000 multivitamin tablets (about 30 million units of vitamin A)! " (The Food Chronology)

    I guess the moral of this story is if you want to try halibut liver, go ahead but keep your portion sizes down (~1 oz.) and remember that, as in all things (except fishing), moderation is the key.

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    Default the gist on the guts...

    I researched and also found limited data on the danger of consuming halibut liver; way too much Vitamin A for the body to handle and a definite no.

    As far as coming up with smoking milt as my own idea, it was. No one told me about it, nor did I read about it.

    that's the gist on all the guts...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

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    Talking gee, sorry bernie

    i should know better than to suspect an author of your skill and renown to stoop so low as to plagiarize or claim another's idea as your own.
    how is the AOD cookbook coming along?
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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    Default Over cooked...

    No cookbook.
    Too much hiatus.
    Could have been a fun inter-active one.

    Creative ideas can run concurrent even though orginators are unaware of others with the same concept. I had not a fathom somebody else was smoking milt packs, let alone even publishing the results.

    I certainly won't be frying halibut liver, but I will put up the caviar.

    By the way, the salmon skins will be back-brushed to remove scales and then snack sized and flour dusted to fry as appetizers dipped into sweet and sour sauce.

    http://www.alaskanatuhor.com

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Default

    Salmon roe can be prepared in a variety of ways that range from dusting whole packs in flour and deep frying, to taking them apart in cold water rinse and then salting to present as caviar.

    How much salt do you use?
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Default Curing salmon roe

    I use one cup of Kosher salt to 3 quarts of water. Taste after 1 hour, if they're not salty enough (often), give 'em more time, tasting at 10 minute intervals until you like the flavor.

    Some people dry-cure, but I don't know that one.

    Matt

  15. #15
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    Default

    I watched Mike Rowe on Dirty Jobs on an Alaskan fishing boat. They save the cod sperm and stomachs for shipment to the Orient. He tried some cooked on the boat and spit it out. Afraid I'll have to pass.

  16. #16

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    Are all salmon eggs the same when it comes to taste or quality?





    or bait?

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