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Thread: Copper River Reds or Kenai River Reds

  1. #1
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    Default Copper River Reds or Kenai River Reds

    There is a debate around my house on which is the preferred fish. I prefer the Kenai red partly because a Kenai red dipped at the mouth is about the prettiest salmon there is. The CC red dipped from the canyon is not as pretty but is just as tasty. More tasty as some family members contend. Cooked the same which do you prefer??
    Pete

  2. #2
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Though I dip from the Kenai...

    ... I'd take a Copper River red over a Kenai red any day. Way richer. I just can't justify the drive when we have a local resource.

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    New member AKDSLDOG's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    ... I'd take a Copper River red over a Kenai red any day. Way richer. I just can't justify the drive when we have a local resource.
    I will second this, copper river red any day but, I have terrible timing on the copper so I usually go to the Kasilof.

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default Reds

    My vote is Copper River Reds.

  5. #5

    Default yes, but why?

    I'm curious as to the taste difference. I've never had Copper River reds...is it believed to be due to a higher fat content as the Copper and tributaries are longer, requiring the fish to travel further, thus they build greater fat reserves? Or are they just a slightly different stock that have superior flavor?
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

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    Default

    The Copper is longer and the current is considerably faster. I would imagine that would make for a oilier/fattier fish. Same with Yukon Kings, but more so for them. More fat/oil makes for better taste, same as a good stake.

  7. #7

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    I cannot wait to hit the Copper again this year! Those reds are the tastiest salmon I have ever eaten. I'm not one for fresh salmon but a fresh Copper River red wrapped with tin foil and cooked in coals on the bank is about as good as it gets.

  8. #8
    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    Default reds are

    of the leanest salmon species. i enjoy them because of that and they are the best smoking fish too as far as i am concerned. just wondering what makes the difference between a copper river red and a silver if fat content is the main observation in taste. if more fat equals better taste then the coho should win the contest every time. and a white winter king should be the most sought out salmon there is. i enjoy the kenai reds because they are half the distance, they are twice as big and the limit is twice as much.

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    I believe that the Kenai reds are a mixed breed of both wild and hatchery fish. The Kenai reds tend to be bigger/heavier (as are many hatchery-influenced fish), and the color of the Kenai River reds is brighter, what with them being so close to the salt water.

    Also, with a family of five, my quota for Kenai River reds is much larger than my standard quota for Copper River reds (even with a supplemental allowance for add'l fish on the Copper River, my standard quota on the Kenai is still more fish, and, as stated earlier, they're bigger fish on top of that).

    That said, I think that the better texture and flavor is found in the Copper River reds. But I don't turn 'em away as a rule, no matter which river they came from..... especially smoked with a spicey sweet terriyaki brine.

    BTW, I noted that of the kings I netted last year, those from the Kenai River were bigger. I found that to be interesting. The kings from the Copper River were so uniform in size, that it almost seemed like the proverbial 'cookie-cutter' sorta' issue. I suspect that if we'd weighed the various kings we caught in the Copper River before throwing them back, they'd have literally been within a pound or two of each other. The two kings I netted at Kenai were about 10 lbs apart from each other; one near 30 lbs, and the other one near 40 lbs. Unfortunately, ya' only get to keep one per permit...

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    Default

    Side by side? I can't tell the difference when the fish are equally cared for. If you take a pampered Copper River fish and place it next to a hacked-up, in the freezer since last July Kenai red? DUH!

    Fresh is better.

  11. #11
    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    I can't tell the difference between Kenai/Copper Reds when they're handled and cooked the same, BUT the Kenai fish are bigger. In fact it seems that all the Kenai salmon are bigger. I once caught a ocean bright humpy that was as long as my leg! Ok, yes, I have short legs, but it was still the biggest humpy I've ever seen.

  12. #12

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    Copper river is better tasting slightly but Kenai is so much closer, more abundent, and larger it just beats out copper

  13. #13
    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    Default depends

    on whos cooking

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