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Thread: Foraging for greens

  1. #1

    Default Foraging for greens

    Whats out there to eat in the 49th state?

  2. #2
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    Fiddleheads & twisted stalk are my 2 favorites.

    KK

  3. #3
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    fiddleheads fried in garlic butter on my cast iron skillet. Now that is yummy
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  4. #4
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Another vote for fiddle heads not seeing them around here yet though. Shrooming should start soon too!
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  5. #5
    Member aksportsmen's Avatar
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    Default fiddle heads

    went up ptarmigan valley last week. the fiddle heads are startign to show

  6. #6
    Member MidnightSunRebel's Avatar
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    Default Ptarmigan fiddleheads

    Is it legal for me to go there and dig any up for transplant to the house? Also I thought mushrooms were more of a fall thing here. What species should i be on the look out for? The only edibles I can readily identify here near Anchorage are boletes. Anybody wanna go hunting on Tuesdays or Thursdays from the anchorage area? I'd love to tag along or share fuel costs.

  7. #7

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    We just had our first fiddleheads of the year a couple of nights ago. Out here they start showing as soon as the snow melts away.
    Chuck

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    The easiest way I have found when looking for a new mushroom area ( the ones around anchorage have been picked clean the last three years ) once we have consistently warm weather over 40 degrees which is right about now all you need to wait for is a good rain the two days after a rain are the time to get your morels look for them in mature cottonwood groves cinubv through the leaves some times you need to move the leaves around some to find them.


    today is looking promising if it would only rain.


    James

  9. #9
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    oh and the fiddle heads out here in the valley are out the ones at lower elevation are almost 12 inches tall and infolding but all the ones a little higher up the knik valley are just poking out!

  10. #10
    Mark
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    We planted native ferns under the porch on the north side of our house (along with Bishop's weed). The fiddleheads started showing last week. Today the new fern shoots are approaching a foot in height.

    One green I absolutely love (even raw) is lambs quarter. I don't think it's native to Alaska, but it can be found in the railbelt area.
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    Went out in the rain today and helped myself what looks like the husk/rust in the photo is the spicy Mrs. Dash I even brought some home in pots to add to the number in the back yard I can get three or four meals out of the back but today seamed like a good time to add to the supply.
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    Member Skookumchuck's Avatar
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    Stinging Nettles are quite good....wear gloves and give them a quick blanch, then use them in anything spinach is good with.

    Spruce tips (sitka) are great! We make jam, honey and beer with them.

    Fireweed is good too. You can eat the young shoots, but we just use the petals for making jam, honey and wine.

    Not too big on fiddleheads myself...

    Chocolate-lilly roots are pretty good as well.

    No mushrooms out here yet

  13. #13
    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Default plenty of wild greens to find out there

    Fireweed shoots are the perfect size for gathering right now. Prepared raw in salads, cooked like asparagus or steamed on rice.

    Wild mustard greens are showing up. The greens are quite tasty, but I particularly love the yellow flower tops.

    There are almost enough leaves to see the difference between the edible Indian potato and the poisonous bear root.

    Wild rhubarb is popping up all over and is so good when it is young and tender.

    Lambsquarters are everywhere and make a great addition to a wild

    salad or cooked in a spinach type dish.

    Too many to talk about them all... but now is the time to start gathering.

    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    We're coming up on the last call for dandelion greens too, they get too bitter to do anything with when the yellow of the flowers show on them, except simmer them in a lot of sugar water with a ham hock or two like collard greens until the bitterness is gone.

  15. #15
    Member Skookumchuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by southeastgirl View Post
    We're coming up on the last call for dandelion greens too, they get too bitter to do anything with when the yellow of the flowers show on them, except simmer them in a lot of sugar water with a ham hock or two like collard greens until the bitterness is gone.

    Dandelion wine is preeeety good too! Never tried the greens....humm might just make a salad tonight....

  16. #16

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    Skookumchuck-Do you know of any good books about edible plants in southeast Alaska?

    Thanks,

    Luke

  17. #17
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    Try Field Guide to Alaskan Wildflowers by Verna E Pratt. It tells you all the edible plants, berries, trees with color photos and what ones have poisonous look-alikes, how to tell the difference between them and where is the best region to look for them. It is the single most informative book I have found so far. I think she has about 100 or more species listed with 248 color photos.

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    Default Thanks

    Southeastgirl,
    The book sounds great. Looking forward to reading through it. I hope to have it in a few days.
    Thanks again!

    Mike

  19. #19
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olaf View Post
    Do you know of any good books about edible plants in southeast Alaska?....
    While not strictly for Southeast Alaska, try Alaska's Wild Plants: A Guide to Alaska's Edible Harvest by Janice J. Schofield.

  20. #20

    Default

    Thanks for the tips on books. I'll check them out.

    Luke

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