Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Night Vision and Chem Lights

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    297

    Default Night Vision and Chem Lights

    FWIW:

    Sometime back there was some discussion as to the *best* color of light stick to get seen in an emergency.

    I attended an avalanche awareness class 2 weeks ago. Also in attendance were some troopers. I asked them if a particular color had a better display in NV goggles. The answer: No. The goggles are sensitive enough to pick up virtually ANY light source.

    Now, back to your regularly scheduled forum.

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kenaimike View Post
    FWIW:

    Sometime back there was some discussion as to the *best* color of light stick to get seen in an emergency.

    I attended an avalanche awareness class 2 weeks ago. Also in attendance were some troopers. I asked them if a particular color had a better display in NV goggles. The answer: No. The goggles are sensitive enough to pick up virtually ANY light source.

    Now, back to your regularly scheduled forum.
    I would have to agree. When I was in the Army, you could see light that wasn't visible to the bare eye. Pretty amazing.

  3. #3
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,008

    Default

    If it's in the visible spectrum NV equipment detects it.

    Chemlight manufacturer, Cyalume, makes infrared light sticks too.
    Could be an option considering that the troopers and military use IR in aerial searches.

    If you're carrying chemlights remember that they are affected by cold.
    Also
    Your eyes see green best
    Yellow gives the best illumination for work
    Red has the least impact on night vision

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    A road flares is my choice for the best chemical light in an emergency.

  5. #5

    Default

    Tie a 4' or 5' piece of 550 cord to the eyelet of a chemlight.

    Distance can be hard to judge some times given the conditions, so wait to crack the chemlight until you can hear the rescue aircraft.

    Holding the end of the 550 cord not tied to the chemlight, whirl the cracked chemlight in a circle above your head as vigorously as possible.

    A static chemlight might not get the attention of your rescuer that a chemlight in motion will.

    An 8' or 10' diameter circle of light is an attention getter to both the naked eye and the eye looking through NVGs.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •