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Thread: 96/69er bikes whats the consensus?

  1. #1

    Default 96/69er bikes whats the consensus?

    Likes or dislikes?

    I've never been on one but my trusty hardtail needs a reworking this year and was doing some searching about whats available to update my bike a bit and came across some sites about them. Are there any people that ride these stye of bikes around here?


    It sounds like something I might be interested in trying. I have an older cannondale f-series bike from about '98 thats been rode pretty hard over the years and I'm looking at replacing a bunch of components anyway.

  2. #2
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    Default What are you talking about?

    As I have no idea. I'm a noob at mtn bikes but I would have thought I know what that meant but don't?? Fill us in. Thanks!

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akbrownsfan View Post
    As I have no idea. I'm a noob at mtn bikes but I would have thought I know what that meant but don't?? Fill us in. Thanks!
    There are mountain bikes out on the market now with 29" wheels and some riders are taking these larger wheels and retrofitting? 29" wheels on to bikes originally designed for 26" wheels (typically on the front by swapping in a larger fork) hence the 96/ 69....I'm fairly certain that the first and last number are referring to which wheel is in the front and rear.

    Some of the advantages of having a larger tire(s) are you are able to rollover objects in the trail a bit easier and you gain some extra clearance between your bottom bracket and the ground.

    there is a bike swap @ trailside elementary (in anchorage) this Saturday I was probably going to browse around looking for parts and pieces and pick a few brains there to see if this would be a costworthy project or if I should shelf my bike and get a newer model.

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    Default

    Aha thank you!! Huh, I have to get my bike repaired anyway....wonder how much a new fork or tire would cost. Now I want to see what you real bike riders say.
    Hey how much better/worth it are disc brakes? I have to get the rear of my Gary Fisher fixed and was thinking of seeing if I could get a rear disc brake put on. Thanks.

  5. #5
    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akpirate View Post
    Likes or dislikes?

    I've never been on one but my trusty hardtail needs a reworking this year and was doing some searching about whats available to update my bike a bit and came across some sites about them. Are there any people that ride these stye of bikes around here?


    It sounds like something I might be interested in trying. I have an older cannondale f-series bike from about '98 thats been rode pretty hard over the years and I'm looking at replacing a bunch of components anyway.
    It may not be a simple matter to convert your 26" MTB to a 69er. Even with a new 29er fork your frame geometry might not allow the larger front wheel to clear the down tube and you could get toe strike on your front tire.

    I have both a 29er (single speed hardtail) and conventional 26" MTBs. The 29er does tend to carry momentum well and rolls over stuff better than a 26, but it is a little tougher to get the big wheels rolling. If you plan to use studded tires in the winter, the Nokkian 29er Extremes are heavy *****es. I feel like it is hard to endo the 29er, the feeling is that I am sitting in between the wheels instead of above them. If you use high volume, low pressure tires like the Kenda Nevegal 2.2s on the 29er, it almost feels like you have more suspension.

    That being said, I'm not sure that 29ers the best for tech work. I rode both at Moab recently and the 29er was not ideal for the real gnarly stuff.

    For Alaska, a geared hardtail 29er would be hard to beat. You can find some reasonably priced frames and complete bikes now. Check with Paramount. They have a nice selection of GF 29ers.

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    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akbrownsfan View Post
    Aha thank you!! Huh, I have to get my bike repaired anyway....wonder how much a new fork or tire would cost. Now I want to see what you real bike riders say.
    Hey how much better/worth it are disc brakes? I have to get the rear of my Gary Fisher fixed and was thinking of seeing if I could get a rear disc brake put on. Thanks.
    A suspension fork can run from el cheapos of around $100 to over $1000 depending on what your needs are. Rigid forks go from $50 to over $300.

    Wheels again show a big price range, but you could probably get a cheapo wheel for $100 or maybe a little less.

    Disc brakes are a huge advantage in wet conditions. Both rim and disc brakes can be set up to lock the wheel with one finger in dry conditions, but the disc will continue to do that when it is wet and the rim brake is fading.

    Unless your frame has the correct mounts it will not be easy to fit disc brakes. If you get a new fork, you could get one with disc brake mounts and then have a front disc and rear rim brake. The front brake is so much more important than the rear that this could be a good option for you.

  7. #7

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    Even with a new 29er fork your frame geometry might not allow the larger front wheel to clear the down tube and you could get toe strike on your front tire.
    I though of this and through some of my searching came across people who place some sort of sleeve/ bump stop on their forks to prevent the tire from bottoming out against the frame

    I feel like it is hard to endo the 29er,
    thats defiantly a plus I like to ride down some steep slopes sometimes and I like to stay behind the handlebars as much as I can

    That being said, I'm not sure that 29ers the best for tech work. I rode both at Moab recently and the 29er was not ideal for the real gnarly stuff.
    most likely I'll be trail riding and some singletrack where I can find it

    I'm trying to keep this whole conversion under 300...(probably haha keep dreamin) too much more than that and I'm more apt to look into getting a new bike

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akbrownsfan View Post
    .... I have to get the rear of my Gary Fisher fixed and was thinking of seeing if I could get a rear disc brake put on. Thanks.
    if it doesnt have tabs already in place its an uphill battle....you may be able to still find bolt on conversion kits from back when disc brakes were first put on the market some companies sold these kits for a short time in order to retrofit discs onto older bikes, but I don't think the kits panned out very well and most avid bikers went out and bought new bikes (or frames) instead.

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