Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Backup motor for limping home.

  1. #1
    Member IceKing02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    552

    Default Backup motor for limping home.

    I have a brand new 15ft Zodiac MkIII HD...

    Will a 2hp outboard be enough to limp home if the main engine poops out? I'm talking about being able to keep headway to get home eventually, not talking about trying to plane out my boat. I would not try to buck strong headwinds or an opposing tide, just move along at displacement speed.

    Looking at the options I can get an Island Hopper 2hp OB for $500...and it's only 20lbs. That is a heck of a price for a weed-wacker and easy to rebuild to boot! To step up to the Honda brand its only a few more bucks and 27lbs...and there ain't many honda engines sitting on the top of the junkpile.

    My boat space is limited and I'm trying to keep the weights down. Furthermore, the engine needs to be stored onboard until needed--the transom does not have lots of extra room despite having a compact 50hp Tohatsu with remote steering.

    So...any advice on this particular option?

    Thanks in advance,

    IceKing02

  2. #2

    Default

    Depends on how far home is. I have never brought a back up on my zodi....I aways figured that it would be easier to just tug the whole thing back than to deal with another motor in an already small boat.

  3. #3

    Default Kicker on inflatable

    Seems light. I used a 5hp Merc on my 15 footerit was tight on the transom but I could make headway against a moderate current.

  4. #4

    Default Kicker save me once

    Maybe this story can help you make your decision: My main died on my Seasport out of Seward, the tide was going out and the wind was blowing in. We were making three knots, the wind was at our backs helping against the tide. Yamaha 9.9 pushing all that boat for about five miles to safety. Anything should work for you with an inflatable, speed not being the issue, but remember tides can run at 3 knots and keep you in the same place burning fuel if your not careful. Good luck!

  5. #5
    Member IceKing02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    552

    Default Its not in the middle of summer on a weekend that I'm worried...

    Its the times in October/November if I'm out deer hunting that worry me... I was figuring that a body could likely make 3-4knots under power and that if one were able to wait for an incoming tide that it is possible to limp back home from Esther or Culross or Shemya (just kidding) and get back to Whittier.

    Did some talking today about this subject and it looks like I may have to go up to the 5hp models to make real headway if I'm dealing with a loaded zodiac...

    IceKing02

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IceKing02 View Post
    Its the times in October/November if I'm out deer hunting that worry me... I was figuring that a body could likely make 3-4knots under power and that if one were able to wait for an incoming tide that it is possible to limp back home from Esther or Culross or Shemya (just kidding) and get back to Whittier.

    Did some talking today about this subject and it looks like I may have to go up to the 5hp models to make real headway if I'm dealing with a loaded zodiac...

    IceKing02
    I know it is apples and oranges, but on my old 16 foot bayliner I could get 5-6 mph out of her with the main engine up with a 6 hp evinrude. I have never thrown it on the back of the zodi. Probably get a little more - but not much though.

  7. #7

    Default Sure something

    Sure somethings better than nothing, I never had a back up on my inflatable a VHF radio & GPS is a must. Almost always some one around or USCG can relay. Rowed for 4 hours once to get back out in sight of boats.

  8. #8

    Default

    The only reason that I never did bring one is because I was always worried about the lack of space, and flooding it with salt water and wrecking it for lack of a good way to seal it up while it is sitting on its side. Also, while your engine could just konk out on that nice sunny day, with Murphy always on the horizon, it will probably happen in 10 foot seas, with breaking waves, pounding rain, 60 mph winds, and in the process of getting it mounted you will probably drop it over the side. You may even get hurt. I am not saying that bringing one is foolish - I am just saying that it probably won't do you any good unless everything is perfect.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    110

    Default Backup motor

    We were crossing Port Wells one snotty afternoon, wind & chop, and my overheat alarm went off...I'd thrown the waterpump belt. The wind was out of the north and the drift was pretty good to make Surprise Cove; I didn't want to work on the engine out in the middle. I had an 8hp on my 25' Bayliner and I sat on the transom with the tiller for an hour or so into Surprise Cove. I'd never set the boat up to use the 8hp as a kicker; it was the motor we used on the the dinghy instead; but it worked well in this case. Given that Alaska can write the book on remote, I'd certainly consider a 2 hp on a 15' Zodiac; especially if there's room on the transom and/or storage space....even 2 hp beats paddling! Plus, a 2 hp will run for hours and hours on a few gallons....at least it could get you into a sheltered cove or bay. It's strictly your choice, but I think I'd be alot happier with a redundant means of propulsion...and not just a set of oars! Mike

  10. #10

    Default Just mount it on the transom

    it will work fine. I did this on my 16 (15.5) Achilles and an 18' Zodiac. I kept it lifted and out of the way, until I wanted to use it. It came in handy when the feul line attachment on my 50 broke in two in the middle of Kachemak bay. go with the 5hp .
    Rob

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •