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Thread: Ruger .375 and all Alaska Game Animals

  1. #1
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default Ruger .375 and all Alaska Game Animals

    What animals have you shot with your Ruger .375 and factory ammo or handloads too I guess? Was there much wasted meat? Is it too much gun for a all around rifle if you only owned one rifle? Has anyone taken a sheep or goat with it? What about Sitka black tail deer?

    I guess .375 HH owners can reply too. Just trying to figure out if I do buy the ruger if I will need a light weight smaller caliber rifle. I have a been a one rifle kinda of guy. My ruger .300 WM has done it all so far. But on the brownie hunt I could see a need for a larger caliber rifle.

    It is alot of gun. But I can shoot it. Really like it. Love the shorter bbl. Light than my .300wm with hogue aluminum bed stock and lupy 3.5x10 VX III.

    Just don't want to waste meat on game.

  2. #2

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    Slower traveling bullets tend to waste less meat than faster ones. Personally, I wouldnt call it a "one gun does all" kinda rifle. Say you moved up here with a .270 and wanted an alternate for the larger stuff, perfect. With you already having something like the .300WM, well, I think that would be a personal judgment call. It would definitely be a better choice on the BIG coastals, or Kodiaks, but then again, the .300 isnt any chump. Its your call man. It would be great for moose and bear, but I wouldnt choose it over the .300 for a sheep/goat/caribou hunt. Now if I happened to have it in my hands when one stepped out...of course. I would probably buy one, but I have a .338 and cant justify it. I say if you like it, and would hunt with it, go for it. It dont hurt to have 2 or 3 rifles in the cabinet. Dont worry about meat destruction, it wont tear up as much as that .300.

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    Default one gun

    I consider a .375 Ruger as a " do it all " cartridge/rifle . You can handload 225 gr. for caribou , 270 gr. for moose and hop all the way up to 350's for the big stuff . The African is a light weight rifle with good iron sights , a good rig . All in all I'd rather have a Ruger .375 than any .338 , go for it .

  4. #4

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    For what its worth and I'm not sure if it is true or not but I was seriously considering purchasing a .375 ruger and ended up with a .338. I ended up with the later due to numerous threads I came across on ruger rifle forums in which people were claiming the stocks on the .375 rugers were subject to some serious cracking.

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    All depends on how proficient you are with your rifle. There is no reason why the .30-06, .300WM, .338WM, as well as a .375H&H can't be used to kill any game in Alaska. What was used in Alaska long ago before the .375 Ruger came into play?

    In reality, most Alaska hunters are not hunting brown/grizzly bears, but bears and other game as a source of food, although these hunters would kill a grizzly if the opportunity arises. Every year you can see newspaper reports where all sorts of bears are killed by the most popular cartridges in Alaska, and I can assure you that these cartridges start with the .30-06, .300WM, and the .338WM. Out in "bush" Alaska, anything goes (whatever is available to the hunter or shooters). The .300WM and the .338WM account for most of the bears killed in Alaska if you keep track of the news on the local papers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigD View Post
    For what its worth and I'm not sure if it is true or not but I was seriously considering purchasing a .375 ruger and ended up with a .338. I ended up with the later due to numerous threads I came across on ruger rifle forums in which people were claiming the stocks on the .375 rugers were subject to some serious cracking.
    Your .338WM is just fine. I have created polls in this forum where the .338WM outnumbered all others by a wide margin. Not only that, but ammo for it is readily available in just about any town in Alaska, and even from other hunters at the hunting grounds I roam at each September. What makes the .338WM so versatile is ammo availability for any game you can think about. For example, lest say that you want to use your .338 for pronghorn-size game at long range: in this case, use some Federal ammo with 180-grain bullets (Federal has two or three loads). With your rifle sighted to hit the 100-yard mark on the same spot from a .300WM and a similar bullet, including its weight, out to 500 yards the 180-grain .338 bullet strikes within 1.5" from that of the .300WM's bullet. The .300 is flatter-shooting, but the additional initial velocity of the factory .338WM 180-grain bullet helps it along the way. Te standard load for it from the loading data is 3120 fps.

    Then if you want to kick on the hill of a .375 H&H that is loaded with 300-grain bullets, in this case you can load it with 300-grain Woodleigh for 2500 fps. Again, it's not a .375H&H, it just overlaps the lower ballistics range of the .375H&H. That's all. The .375H&His the King in my view, but heavier than the average .338WM for long-carry sessions. Ammo for both of these calibers are readily available anywhere in town.

    Other than that, I am not an expert on hunting bears, nor anything else. I read a lot, gather all sorts of data, use my common sense, and get lucky each year during moose season.

  7. #7

    Default .300WM vs .375 Ruger

    I have a .300WM .338WM and .375 H&H. All three are very close to the same ballistics for the various bullet weights. I don't find a heck of a lot of difference. However, some argue that 2000lbs of energy in .300x180gr is less than 2000lb energy from a .375 x 300gr.I'm not that technical. If your a one gun guy and you already have a .300 WM, can shoot it well and like it. Keep it!! For sheep, caribou and such I'd use a 160-180 gr. , for the bigger stuff, especially grizzly & brown bear, I'd use a 200-210 gr in high energy. You'll be fine. Put the bullet where it needs to be and you'll have your game, whichever it may be. I should also add that I have never shot a brown bear but I know people that have have using all the mentioned calibres. Good luck

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    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    I have talked with guys that shoot the 375 H&H at everything. They say that it doesn't waste as much meat as the .30 cals. I have a 375 Ruger, haven't shot anything but paper with it, yet, but it will be my everything in AK rifle. If you check the ballistics tables published by Hornady, you'll see that the 375 Ruger factory loads are about 150 fps faster than the 375 H&H and at ranges over 300yds that equals a much flatter trajectory and more energy. The African and Alaskan are much lighter than the other 375s on the market, which makes them much more pleasant to carry and I didn't find the recoil as brutal as the 300 mags or the 338 mags. Over all a very pleasant cartrige to shoot. I bedded my stock before firing mine and suggest you do the same. Rugers tend to be a little sloppy in fitting stocks to recoil lugs, which caused the stock problems that were experienced in the first run of rifles put out. I think you'll be happy with the 375 Ruger as your all around rifle for everything with hooves or big teeth here in Alaska.

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default sweet

    thanks for the relpies. I figured it should be fine. I like the weight and how easy it was to shoulder. The 20" bbl make is very sweet.

    As for recoil. I can handle it, or I did that one day. I hurt the next day though, a lot more than my .300wm, but it is heavy and also has a scope. I shot a bare .375 ruger.

    Maybe keep an eye out for a ruger .300wm with factory stock and hogue overmold aluminum stock with a luepold VX III 3.5X10X40mm for sale soon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by logman View Post
    I consider a .375 Ruger as a " do it all " cartridge/rifle . You can handload 225 gr. for caribou , 270 gr. for moose and hop all the way up to 350's for the big stuff . The African is a light weight rifle with good iron sights , a good rig . All in all I'd rather have a Ruger .375 than any .338 , go for it .
    Have you shot a .338 v. the .375 Ruger? How do they compare from the human end of the bang stick?

    Brian

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    Default Ruger 375

    Quote Originally Posted by tananaBrian View Post
    Have you shot a .338 v. the .375 Ruger? How do they compare from the human end of the bang stick?

    Brian
    I owned a .338WM prior to purchasing the .375, and it is a noticable difference. The recoil is more of a push when compared to the .338, but not as bad as you would expect. I'm sure the stock has a lot to do with that. I have not hunted with it yet, but when shooting at the range I have shot it from a rest & standing position with no issues even on icy surfaces. It's a great rifle with some incrediable ballistics.

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