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Thread: Nightforce NXS 5.5-22 x 50

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    Default Nightforce NXS 5.5-22 x 50

    Anyone have experience along these lines? (Nightforce NXS 5.5-22 x 50)
    Pros? Cons - other than price?
    I'm thinking about long range shooting and maybe F Class.

    Thanks!
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneRound View Post
    Anyone have experience along these lines? (Nightforce NXS 5.5-22 x 50)
    Pros? Cons - other than price?
    I'm thinking about long range shooting and maybe F Class......
    An acquaintence who was a full time trapper/hunter swore by his.

    I wish I could afford one. I had hoped to put one on a Tikka T3 Varmint in 243, but I'm afraid the price is making me lean elsewhere.

    I was also looking at the 50mm Leupolds, but they're darned near the price of the Nightforces.

    Then a friend bought one of these. It was around $200. He put it on a Contender in 22/250. I got to peek through it on a dark morning.

    I was impressed. At that price, you can buy 6 of them for the price of one Nightforce.

  3. #3
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    Default Nightforce experience

    I have used an 8-32 x 56 NXS on a Barrett 107 50cal in the sandbox, target engagement at a maximum range of 1700 meters (my limit not the platform - seen the really good precision shooters service targets at 2000.) What ever your intent is I believe a Nightforce is up to the task. Good scope, fairly bright. Definitely sturdy held up to plenty of abuse. Don't know what you are planning to mount it on, but, for whatever cartridge (308?) you'll be shooting it should be plenty good to 1000 yards in F-Class. Nightforce are decent tactical scopes a little heavier than Leopold Mark 4s, IMO a step up and with the recent increase in Leo prices really not that much more $. The Nightforce benchrest model is also very well thought of in the long range fraternity.

    Good optics are expensive and you get what you pay for. I actually prefer US Optics in a tactical scope and Schmidt and Bender are even mo better. Where are you located? If you have access to a range frequented by military, LEO, or civilian long shooters I suggest going and taking a looksee at what they're using and see if you can take a peek thru their glass and judge for yourself. Might want to go step on the line at an F-Class competition to check it out. Also, you need to take into consideration the weight restriction if shooting F class F/TR.


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    Thanks to both of you for the insight. I picked up a Rem 700 SS with a 5R bull bbl and put on it an Elite 4200 2.5x10 that I already had. Those, and Zeiss Conquests, are my favorite hunting glass (in that price range), but I felt like I could shoot the rifle better with stronger glass on it. With 175 gr. .308s, the new rifle shot .5 MOA (really happy with the new 5R barrel) but I felt that the 10 power limited the accuracy, even as close as 100 meters.

    I know I could buy any old glass at a higher power, but I figure this is my chance to get some really nice glass for a change, instead of buying something midrange. Leupold Mark 4 is definitely not an option. Was concerned about a few folks saying that the NF NXS could make the rifle a little top heavy. I'm sure you didn't experience that with the Barrett.

    Do you have any advice about getting the NF NXS with the zero stop feature? Guess that's handy when you're changing your dope a lot. They're asking $200 more for that.

    BTW, thanks for your service, Timber. The young men and women I worked with over there gave me new faith in the future of our country.

    Best,
    OR

  5. #5

    Exclamation NF vs. US Optics

    I have shot both US Optics and NF. The NF 5.5x22x56 with Zero Stop is a great scope with Very good relief. I canít recall the US Optics I shot but it had the Horus Reticle System on it to assist with range finding and acquisition. It was based on a Palm pilot system that calculated Windage, Drop, and Curvature of the Earth at Ultra Long Distance in addition to ballistic coefficients for grain, material, primer size and a few other options.

    It took some time to get the hang of but after familiarizing myself it virtually eliminated the need for a spotter.

    Both Optics Systems are great. Most any scope in that price range will perform to your expectations. Itís mostly Personal Preference and if I had to choose I would run with the US Optics with Tactical Turrets and the Horus Reticle all day.

    I will attach a few links to Horus Vision so you can try out the Reticle System I have been referring too. Keep in mind that you can add this to any scope you purchase in the Tactical Category. Play around with it for a few you will love it.

    Also it looks like they make there own Optics Line now so that may be another option.

    http://www.horusvision.com/

    http://www.horusvision.com/img/hrsgame.swf Ŗ DEMO

    http://www.horusvision.com/software.php Á Software
    The best way to change someones mind is with a ROCK!!

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Price wise NF is really at the entry level for a scope. At the other end is US Optics and S&B at a start of close to 3K and up with US Optics.

    I'm hooked on S&B, had the the NF and it was just to heavy, The reticle has a vary steep learning curve.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Default Heavy

    Big Al - what did you have the NF on that you found it to be too heavy?

    Guess I better start saving....

  9. #9
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    I have a live Varmint rifle. It is a Sako action with a Lilja lite varmint tapper fluted barrel with a McMillan General purpose stock. Same Stock used for the M-40 sniper rifle. This rifle is a wildcat .22 center fire that makes a swift look slow. I use it on long shots for caribou, shoots the 80 grain bullets real nice. I put a 6.5X20 Zeiss on it after going though the arm curls with the NF. The neat thing about the NF is, when the hunting is slow you can sit out there, and try to figure out how the reticle is supposed to work.

    The only good thing I can say about NF is, they have a great resell value.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Default I'll bite...

    ..... what reticle did you have on the NF?

  11. #11
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    I had the one with the circles and all the lines. Range finder reticle? The one you set at 22X and use the circles to find where the body fit, in which circle to figure the distance.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  12. #12

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    Honestly, I can't stand NF. If your going to spend that much money buy a Schmidt & Bender. I just got mine and nothing compares. People can swear up and down all day about NF, But do a side by side with S&B and you'll think your looking through a Tasco.

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    Default S&B

    What comparable S&B can I buy for near the price of a NF NXS 5.5-22x50? (Was $1485 @ snipercountry PX, but looks like they jacked it back up to $1567.50 again).

    I had the impression I couldn't even say "Schmidt" for $1500.

  14. #14

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    Your about right...The 1.5-6X42 I just bought was 1549.00....I think the power of scope ur looking for will go at least 1800, but if you can afford 1500 for a lesser, whats 300?

  15. #15

    Default USO Scope

    Quote Originally Posted by OneRound View Post
    What comparable S&B can I buy for near the price of a NF NXS 5.5-22x50? (Was $1485 @ snipercountry PX, but looks like they jacked it back up to $1567.50 again).

    I had the impression I couldn't even say "Schmidt" for $1500.
    I have a US Optics that I just took off my Long Range Stick I will sell you. Its a 3.2X17X44 30mm Tube with the Horus Range Finding Reticle Sun Shade, Flip Ups, Side Focus Knob. The reticle is ($400.00) without instalation($150.00) and the scope retails for ($2499.00) I also have the Palm Pilot($380.00) and A-Trag software($199.99) for range calculation over 1800yrd's. Let me know if your interested and ill forward pics to ya. Just drop me a line with your email.

    I would come off it for @$2400.00-$2500.00
    The best way to change someones mind is with a ROCK!!

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    PM sent to you, ST.

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    Sorry for the long reply:

    Please note that I'm not a long distance shooter, just a hunter and pairie dog shooter. I've looked through a few of these scopes but have never shot with one and doubt I ever will. Nor am I a person with a military operations background, however I work for the military as a consultant, sometimes SOCOM and the Marine corps, and have done a few projects for people who use these types of scopes on a daily basis and have evaluated the heck out of them. I've only read one or two magazine articles about military sniping weapons and don't read the newstand rags about that stuff, its all pretty rediculous and doesn't follow reality from a military standpoint.

    Most of my projects are extremely boring (hey, I'm an engineer, no one said it would be exciting), but the sniping/long range ones are fairly interesting. The MOST interesting part is that even among the evaluators there's very little emperical data on what the best scope in terms of clarity, accuracy, etc. They constantly argue. Its a Ford/Chevy/Dodge argument thing with only opinions and very little data, which isn't good when you consider how important this equipment is in an asymetric war that uses individual weapons far more than multi-million dollar aircraft. However, from the military users standpoint:
    Briefly:
    NF is the standard for the best combination of return to zero, reliability, clarity, reticle, etc.. When these people's job is to practice all the time using the reticle becomes second nature. The reliability and ruggedness of the erector tube is...outstanding regardless of what some writer once tried to claim. The data they collect at the depot that handles all SOCOM individal weapons is that the NF has the lowest, by a long long shot, rate of returns (highest initial quality). The military sniper's biggest asset is reliability and accuracy and NF comes out on top (again, at least on an opinion basis on accuracy, data backs up the reliability). I've been to the NF factory and have never, in 20 years of doing this type of work, seen a group of people more passionate about quality. I could go on about this, but its inspiring to see how the company is run and the dedication to utter ruggedness. The tests each scope goes through blew me away, I was sure they all would break and none did. My cheap Weaver would have been in the trash on the first test.

    One of the biggest comments from snipers was the plane that the reticle is in, first or second, and how the reticle either stays "small" or grows with increased magnification thereby making it harder to see the target at extreme range in real world sniping conditions. I don't recall which scope has the reticle in which plane, just that a growing reticle helped with quick ranging. However, when you have a range finder it didn't matter that much.

    US Optics is STRONGLY being evaluated with great initial results. I haven't been to the factory, but assume that they must be doing some great things. One guy on a SOCOM evaluation project had the US Optics with the Horus vision reticle and was very, very impressed with the whole system and shot the crud out of it on multiple high recoiling rifles over several days, even a 20mm (!). He cradled the scope like it was his baby. One of the speciality ammo manufacturers who shoots long range competitively uses a US Optics and shot his rifle five times and DROPPED THE RIFLE ON THE SCOPE from four feet (must have been aweful to witness) and shot it again five times with no change in zero. None. Not that NF might not be able to do the same (?) but he's stuck on US Optics and he shot NF scopes for years.

    S&B is the Marine Corp standard (which doesn't mean as much as I thought it did) and they are back ordered and some people have a tough time with the "backwards" reticle adjustment in live fire situations. These scopes were not strongly considered by evaluators and I think its due to the lack of familiarity with the system. I've never even looked through one.

    Leupold was on the smaller caliber sniper rifles but was not considered in the same league as the other three in terms of long range, daily practice, real world conditions. There was no data to back up the assumption that the Leupolds were less reliable, just heresay. I just wish I had the cash for a Leupold, let alone a NF or US Optics.

    Now I'm off topic, but anyways...

    As for actions, stocks, barrels, etc.: there are lots of good manufacturers with, again, no valid statistical data that could show that one was more accurate than another (from semi-custom production rifles, not fully custom built ones). There is one barrel manufacturer who is the sole source for SOCOM on one of the .300WM rifles they put together and even he doesn't know whey they choose him, but he's sure glad they do.

    The fit of the stock and the ability to practice without excessive recoil seemed to be the most important aspect of setting up a usable sniping rifle.

  18. #18

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    Thanks MtAl... one of the best posts I've read on this site.

    Is the SOCOM barrel supplier Dan Lilja? No need to answer if you dont think you should.

    I dont have near the field experience in this subject as you, but my research leads me to believe, that in overall field reliability, and in all the ways a long range rifle scope should show excellence, the two that stand out are USO and NF. And I'm not nocking the others, but these are the scopes on most military sniper rifles. My personal opinion is... that if NF is not a better scope than USO than it is as good or better for the dollars, and way more scope than any NA hunter would ever need.

    $.02

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    Montana Rifleman,

    Thanks for the kind words. It was certainly a very interesting project. We hired a balistician, two armorers who put lots and lots of sniper rifle systems together for the military and civilians and several barrel and ammunition manufacturers and talked to quite a few competitive long range shooters. The bottom line is that there are a lot of excellent products out there that can be put together to get a projectile on target at very long range.

    Assuming everything was put together properly and loaded properly (a big job, but with any number of actions, triggers, barrels, stocks, scopes, etc.), the three biggest factors for success were training, training and training. In that order. For training to happen recoil needs to be managable and the ammo can't be crazy expensive everytime you pull the trigger.

    Also, I agree that these two manufacturers, NF and USO, and most likely S&B and perhaps others, provide all the scope anyone could ever want.

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    MT AL,

    Thank you VERY MUCH for sharing your experiences and insights with us. I have to agree that yours was one of the best posts I've ever read here. As a guy who's never seen the R&D, testing, and building end, I am quite jealous of you and the insights you've gained along the way.

    I am about ready to pull the trigger (pun intended) on the purchase of a Nightforce scope but I am a little confused about one issue. I lean toward buying one with a milrad/mildot reticle, but all of the scopes I've seen have MOA adjustments. Seems pretty unusual (to be very polite) to have a milrad/mildot reticle and MOA dope adjustments.

    1) Why would so many folks buy a NF scope with turrets that don't match the reticle?
    2) Does SOCOM use reticles that match the adjustments, or do they use MOA adjustments and mildot reticles?

    Much thanks for your insights!
    OR

    PS - Do you know why the USMC went with S&B?

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