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Thread: Smorgasboard of bear questions

  1. #1

    Exclamation Smorgasboard of bear questions

    I have been reading around ADFG and it gives instructions to spray your meat with some kind of citrus acid or such to help the outside crust and keep bugs out? When hanging from game bags over a pole is this required?

    How long do you hang your bear meat in game bags?

    Secondly after your meat has devolped a crust what do you do with it, just put it in a cooler with some ice? - ADFG said keep it cool clean dry- So what are some ideas when the weather is over 60*, is shade sufficent?

    Once the bear is skinned do you just tie all of the paws to a pole( as if you were streching it) and throw an adequite ammount of salt on it for preservative?

    To get a bear sealed can the hide be salted yet, and does an appointment need to be made in order for it to be sealed?

    Once the bear is sealed how do you go about making arrangements with a taxedermist?

    Ton of questions I know, sorry, but really have had these on my mind

    Thanks for any and all answers-
    Nick

  2. #2
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    my understanding is the citrus acid helps slow or stop growth of bacteria.
    my bear meat gets placed in game bags and hung under a tarp tokeep any rain off. or ice in bottom of cooler then lay garbage bag over ice and meat in game bags in on top iff room a coat or blanket on top to help insulate......leave drain open top allow water to drain out.
    usually cut it as soon as possible when i get home except back straps get made into sandwiches first night .

    lay hide on tarp and salt well. if possible leave like that if not ot gets rolled up and put in game bag. many times goes under same tarp that i hang meat under. measure before you salt the hide if you want to know....actually i measure before i skin it..... no tape measure use piece of rope and tie knots in it then measure later,.
    it can be salted when sealed , many taxidermist can seal it for you. in soldotna , palmer and anchorage i have just showed up and the will seal it
    in soldtna they do it in their office, palmer out back and anchorage has shednext to parking lot.

    i would contact taxidermist before going out to hunt and get hints on proper way to skin hide and care for it.
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    Member Bear Buster's Avatar
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    Check out a taxidermist before you go bear hunting as to where your going to have it rugged out or whatever....they will probably to tell you NOT to use salt if you can get it to them in a reasonable amount of time from kill and temperature plays a factor, the colder it is outside the longer you have.

  4. #4

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    Correct me if I am wrong but a statie can also seal a hide? Going to POW and heard this. First bear hunt. Lots to learn.

  5. #5
    Member RCBOWHUNTER's Avatar
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    Fishwacker~

    I am sure there will be plenty of advice given to you, but to keep it short I would check out Larry Bartlett's video "Wilderness Taxidermy". It will likely answer a lot of your questions.

    RC

  6. #6
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    Citric acid spray will help retard bacteria growth and help form the crust. Good stuff, helps keep flies off to (personal; observation).

    How long do you hang your bear meat in game bags?

    Until I can get it to be processed or process it myself. I've never worried about the time as far as aging it is concerned.

    Secondly after your meat has devolped a crust what do you do with it, just put it in a cooler with some ice? - ADFG said keep it cool clean dry- So what are some ideas when the weather is over 60*, is shade sufficent?

    If you put it in a cooler with ice, it gets wet. It all depends on where you are hunting. Over in Prince William Sound in May there's usually a snow slide or chute close to where we camp so we place the meat in heavy duty plastic bagfs and bury it in the snow. Seems ot work.

    Once the bear is skinned do you just tie all of the paws to a pole( as if you were streching it) and throw an adequite amount of salt on it for preservative?

    Skin it, flesh it, if youare going to be out there for awhile, turn the ears and lips. Salt the hide, roll it up skin to skin and put it in a game bag. Hang on the pole by the meat.

    To get a bear sealed can the hide be salted yet, and does an appointment need to be made in order for it to be sealed?

    A hide can be salted, just not frozen. Appointment not necessary. Some of the taxidermists are also authorized to seal the hides, Knight's was one of them.

    Once the bear is sealed how do you go about making arrangements with a taxedermist?

    Just pick one, take it to him and tell him what you want.

    My advice would be to talk to a taxidermist first. Russ Knight in Anchorage will give you a "lesson" in bear skinning so you don't wind up with what he calls a "six legged" bear. They can tell you if they want you to salt it, the use of TTC, give you skinning tips, etc.

  7. #7
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Some more

    When sealing a bear the sealer, just needs to know two things. What was the sex and was it lactating. Pretty much if it is lactating you know the sex and you might have a problem. Salted is fine. Sometimes, if the weather is hot you just might have to freeze the hide to preserve it. It is fine to do so as long as you do a few things. One, make sure the skull is removed. Two, fold the hide in such a manner that the sex of the bear can still be determined. You should have no problems.

    The sealer will take two measurements of the skull so having the meat removed helps. He/she may also want a tooth for research. Freezing the skull makes it hard to pull a tooth. Usually the skull is small enough that just placing it in the refrigerator is enough.

    I always call first before going to have it sealed. Just courtesy. And a F&G enforcement officer can seal the bear too. In Valdez, a Dave Winney, one of our local taxidermists seals bears as well. The F&G office on Raspberry Road in Anchorage should be able to tell you the closest sealer.

    For a taxidermist I would call around and get some prices. Using the search engine on the forum might help you decide too.

    Meat - we usually have it in the frig. the same day. Sometimes we pack snow or ice around it in coolers. We use game bags primarily for keeping it clean. It is usually plenty cold enough in the spring around Valdez.

    Somewhere on the F&G web site is a printable handout on skinning. You might just want to print it out for your first time.

    Fishwacker - keep asking questions. That is how you are going to learn. If I remember right, no one in your family hunts? So please ask away so we can help you out.

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  8. #8

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    Yeap thats right, family loves to fish but not so much on the hunting side, really wish I had somone in person that has done it and could show me the ropes but thats not gonna happen so ive been reading alot, thanks for the answers everyone its been extremely helpful

  9. #9
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Too bad

    Too bad you don't live over this way. At least I could help you get started out. Maybe someone around Anchorage that baits and bow hunts will step up and at least take you out once.

    Have you been practing with the bow?

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  10. #10

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    Yeah ive been practicing but I need to take it to a shop and get it fixed, fell on the ice straight on my back and the bow went flying a couple of feet =/ now it shoots 4-8 in to the left

  11. #11

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    Skinning/butchering question

    I had previously thought once I get my bear the first the I will do will to be to gut it and then start working on the skinning and butchering process- Seemed reasonable, Most of the videos I've seen have been of deer and they've all been gutted first, However today at Michael Strahan's presentatioin of field care of big game he was talking about how he removes the guts last.... Now after saying that let me comment that he was speaking of moose so thats why im wondering weather or not to gut a bear first thing? I still think gutting first would be easier

  12. #12
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I probably wouldn't gut a griz at all. I would probably gut a blackie that I was planning on eating depending on where it was shot and how easily I could get around it. Honestly there are ways to fully quarter a moose or bear, taking every bit of the meat (including ribs, back strap and tenderloin) without ever gutting it! Sure makes it nice to be able to avoid cutting a bladder or bowl and getting urine or feces on your meat. You can practice this on snowshoes (minus the ribs) and if you can do them then a moose or bear would be easy!

  13. #13
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Default depends

    A lot of your questions have variables. Mainly, how long you're in the field before coming home with the bear, and what the field conditions are. I don't think hanging bear meat to age it is necessary, but if you're in the field with it, hanging is important. If you can't skin it right away, then gut it. If you're going to be skinning it within a couple hours of the shot, then its probably not necessary to gut it first.

    For me, the ideal way to deal with it, though often not practical, is to hang the bear, skin it, then gut and butcher it. However, this is not always an option, so then it generally involves field butchering.

  14. #14
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default No gutting

    Fishwacker: There is no reason to gut a bear.

    If you position it on the back, cut the skin up the belly and then start up the legs on one side. Peal the hide off of the one side and remove the two quarters and one back strap and place into game bags.

    Then do that other side, peal skin, remove quarters and back strap and place into bags.

    Then work the hide on the current side around the back rolling the bear off of the hide as you go.

    The body and guts, should be in one pile with nothing exposed except the outside of the carcass.

    You are only require to remove the 4-quarters and back straps.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_2061029_skin-bear.html?ref=fuel

    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/magazine/blbcare.htm

    http://www.wc.adfg.state.ak.us/index...rhunt.skinning

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    If you do as Dave described but want the tenderloins then you just need to make an incision along each side of the spine starting just behind the ribs. From that incision you can access and remove the loins.

  16. #16

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    If your in the Fairbanks area, stop in my shop and i will answer your question's and show you how to properly take care or your hide for taxidermy... This goes for any one else that needs to know the proper technics of hide and skinning care.

    A quality Trophy mount starts with quality Hide care.

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