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Thread: Record setting haul

  1. #1

    Default Record setting haul

    Last edited by Steelieguy; 04-02-2008 at 16:12. Reason: spelling

  2. #2
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    Default Great Photo

    Do you know who Snowgoose14 is or how I could track down the person who took that photo?
    Thanks,
    DR

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I wish I could find a job on a herring boat... Those deckhands probably made 10K on that set...
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  4. #4

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    At $550 per ton for 1300 tons, maybe over $50K per deckhand

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beluga View Post
    At $550 per ton for 1300 tons, maybe over $50K per deckhand
    Thats pretty good for a few hours of work...
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default

    How often does that large of a haul happen though? How far do they have to travel? Real questions - as I don't know.

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    If thats the same one I heard about in Sitka, it was a $450,000 haul. Nice set.

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    Member CanCanCase's Avatar
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    Next year, you'll see that same picture in some Sierra Club propaganda about how we're wiping them out... there's already been an attempt to classify Lynn Canal Herring as a distinct sub-species and get them listed under the ESA... theoretically stopping any development up Lynn Canal or in Berner's Bay.

    A friend of mine promised his GF they'd get married as soon as he had $100K in the bank... A friend of that friend had a herring permit, and they fished it out of Sitka. It's not the boat in the pic, but they're getting married this week...

    -Case
    M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
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  9. #9

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    Here is some more info I got from another site from a guy name Justin who may have taken the picture.

    Unofficial record and the final tally was 1500 tons 3 million pounds. Everyone said they would get $1000 a ton , but the roe was a little immature so they only ended up with $550 a ton. The boat was the Infinite Glory out of homer, and there was 2 other boats that got close to 1000 tons. This year they were alocated one of the largest quotas in history 14,723 tons. The take is only get 8% of the expected total spawners in Sitka sound.

    The vessels are 58 feet or less as per the regs. herring never even touch thier boat. Just wrap em and wait for a tender. A few of the tenders were crab boats from the deadliest catch. They were corking that net like crazy buoys about every 3 or 4 feet and a few boats tied up as corks to boot.
    Last edited by Steelieguy; 04-03-2008 at 09:52. Reason: spelling

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Posted elsewhere:

    Here are the details i got from a friend from a couple of days ago.

    Total 1825 tons
    $645 per ton = $ 1,177,125
    crew share 10% ($117,000!!!)

    Also said that 1/2 died b-4 processing had finished.

    The bio-mass of feed is a HUGE component of the prevailing "ocean conditions" that sustain salmon stocks from OR to WA to BC to AK. With chinook stocks up and down the west coast suffering from "poor ocean conditions" is there any wonder why?
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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  11. #11

    Default Who is the customer?

    Quote Originally Posted by fishNphysician View Post
    Posted elsewhere:




    The bio-mass of feed is a HUGE component of the prevailing "ocean conditions" that sustain salmon stocks from OR to WA to BC to AK. With chinook stocks up and down the west coast suffering from "poor ocean conditions" is there any wonder why?
    Here is a question, who buys the eggs? Why?
    Hey, it's good business for AK, but like the Doctor asks above, is it hurting salmon runs? I just can't understand why people buy the eggs man, that's gross.
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    most of the roe is shipped off to asia,

    and in the grand scheme of things the sitka sound fishery is very small... More worrying in "poor ocean conditions" are the dead zone off california, the increase in hatchery releases competing for food. The lack of herring in PWS etc. Sitka sound is still a vibrant fishery and is managed fairly well.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  13. #13
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default I bet I'm not the only one...

    Quote Originally Posted by wildog View Post
    Here is a question, who buys the eggs? Why?
    Hey, it's good business for AK, but like the Doctor asks above, is it hurting salmon runs? I just can't understand why people buy the eggs man, that's gross.
    ... on this forum that would say that herring roe, especially on kelp, is a delicacy. I love it. I'm not native or Asian, but you should try it before you say it is "gross".
    As for how it affects king stocks, I can't say for sure. That is why we have fish biologists working for the state of Alaska... so that fishermen can make a living, and so that some of you can play with salmon on their way to spawn.

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    Member MRFISH's Avatar
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    Default not so fast...

    Quote Originally Posted by fishNphysician View Post
    The bio-mass of feed is a HUGE component of the prevailing "ocean conditions" that sustain salmon stocks from OR to WA to BC to AK. With chinook stocks up and down the west coast suffering from "poor ocean conditions" is there any wonder why?
    "...is there any wonder why?" Give me a break.

    Kind of knee-jerk, FNP. Do you have anything to back that up?

    Poor ocean conditions can mean a whole lot of things, but it's not likely to be directly related to the herring harvest in Sitka. In fact, this year's high harvest quota in Sitka is because the biomass is also way up.

    Herring stocks in AK are managed fairly conservatively, with harvest rates ranging from 10-20% of the available biomass. Most herring fisheries in AK also have minimum thresholds...ensuring that no fishery occurs in years of low herring abundance. You can read more about the SE herring fisheries in the 2007 mgmt plan (I couldn't find the '08 plan online, but the regs and harvest strategy haven't changed since then)

    http://www.cf.adfg.state.ak.us/regio...sac_roe_mp.pdf

  15. #15
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    The traditional customer for the bulk of the west-coast herring sac-roe fishery is Japan.

    Kazunoko (herring roe sac) is one of the 12 or so Traditional Osechi-ryori, or traditional new-years holiday foods. Given as gifts in ornate laquer boxes, these traditions once drove the price of sac-roe herring to as high as $2200/ton, but as the old traditions slowly lose hold, Kazunoko is now being remarketed as a lower-end semi-staple, and recent pricing trends reflect this lower status.

    Herring spawn over many year-classes, and extensive capture-only fishing is done throughout the winter to determine the health of the standing-stock. Unlike some fisheries, the Sitka Sound herring stocks are mostly Discrete, and therefore the buffer against error is reduced, albeit slightly, because you are dealing with a well-understood biomass. The GHL is set at a max of 20% and to the best of my knowledge, that has never been taken from the fishery. This year's harvest was 14,700 tons, and while I am not sure of the GHL data (not published yet) but the basic formula for quantification gives a basis of 20,000 ton spawning biomass before a fishery is allowed at 10% THL, then adding 2% for every additional 20,000 tons of spawning biomass.

    Hope that helps.

    Mark

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