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Thread: Timber King Sawmills

  1. #1
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Default Timber King Sawmills

    Looking for a small ( 1220 ) sawmill in alaska, looking to buy one , but the shipping is killing me. Also would like to here coments on how well they preform. Also I am interested in a portable water drilling machine, Deep Rock or something along the same line, shiping to alaska is getting out of hand. any info will be welcome. Thanks E.S.

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    I have been dreaming of a mill for about five years. I have finaly decided on the Logasol mill its a chainsaw mill that is of the highest quality its not real fast but it mills lumber better than you can buy. check out there website. the m-7 mill is made out of alumanum and only waghy 110 lps not including the chainsaw. That i can haul in a small plane with no problem.
    post the web site of your mill ill check it out...........

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    Default SawMill

    This is timberkings website. www.timberking.com The 1220 is about $6000.00 before shipping, the B20 is about $15,000.00 before shipping. E.S.

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    I heard a rumor that Koch lumber in Anchor Pt. is closing up shop. Last time I was there I'm pretty sure they were running four mills. Might be for sale..? Like I said rumor, have'nt spoken to the owners about it. I have a mill already, an old woodmizer. Pretty cool to make your boards. Good luck.

  5. #5

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    I have a 1220 TK and it runs great. The only problem I have with the thing is that the cable drive system sucks!!!!! If you get into a large log you will be pushing the power head by hand to get it through the log. It could be replaced by a chain drive system pretty easlily though which is what they should have done anyway.

    BWM
    "Spirituality is the ultimate survival skill. When one is primarily on a spiritual quest, the desire for material objects is effectively lessened. This can make an enormous difference to us in the coming trials since we stand a big chance of losing many of our goodies. We will be in states of shock and anguish. Yet if we learn to not mind losing them, there is no loss. Material goods are to Americans as alcohol is to a drunk. In both cases, losing the craving is a benefit." Mike Oehler

    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson, to Archibald Stuart, 1791"

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Default mill

    Backwoodsman, would it help if it had the larger engine? And also any other things that you would change on them. Thinking about hauling one out in the backwoods, and wood like to know more about them before I get it there. Thanks E.S.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    Backwoodsman, would it help if it had the larger engine? And also any other things that you would change on them. Thinking about hauling one out in the backwoods, and wood like to know more about them before I get it there. Thanks E.S.
    Power is not the issue. I have the 20hp Koler for what it's worth. It's that the cable slips when going through larger logs, say 20+ inches. Now one thing to remmeber/think about is that I am in Missouri (regetably) and haven't moved yet. I cut mostly oaks, you may not have the problems that I have had with it slipping One thing that is very important is to get the log deck level, that is if you want anything close to being true on your diminsions. I can see where shipping would be an issue up there though because I only live about 6hrs. form the factory and it cost me about $500 to get it shipped here!!!!!

    BWM
    "Spirituality is the ultimate survival skill. When one is primarily on a spiritual quest, the desire for material objects is effectively lessened. This can make an enormous difference to us in the coming trials since we stand a big chance of losing many of our goodies. We will be in states of shock and anguish. Yet if we learn to not mind losing them, there is no loss. Material goods are to Americans as alcohol is to a drunk. In both cases, losing the craving is a benefit." Mike Oehler

    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson, to Archibald Stuart, 1791"

  8. #8

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    One other thing that I highly recomend if you will be sawing many logs that are say in the 12" or smaller size. Is to take some 2x2" square tubing and bolt it to the log deck on the side of the log stops verticaly and use them instead of the log stops that come with the mill. On small logs the factory log stops are hard to grip the logs with. One thing you might want to consider as well is can you get the blades resharpend up there? Sharpening equipment is going to run you $1500+.


    Have you ever looked at these mills?

    http://www.mobilemfg.com/about.html

    If I was going to do it again I would likely get one of these. You can get a tooth sharpener that mounts right on it and runs off the motor battery.

    BWM
    "Spirituality is the ultimate survival skill. When one is primarily on a spiritual quest, the desire for material objects is effectively lessened. This can make an enormous difference to us in the coming trials since we stand a big chance of losing many of our goodies. We will be in states of shock and anguish. Yet if we learn to not mind losing them, there is no loss. Material goods are to Americans as alcohol is to a drunk. In both cases, losing the craving is a benefit." Mike Oehler

    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson, to Archibald Stuart, 1791"

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Default logs

    Up here the average log I'd be cutting would be about 12" and it would be spruce and birch, so I probably would'nt have the slipping problem. Not sure about the sharpening, have to look into that. (Spruce is a pretty soft wood, so i'd probably get a little more out of the blade,) That oak is a pretty tough wood, how does the mill do on it? How long do your blade's last before you get them sharpened? I looked at the other mill, I liked the concept for larger logs, just not sure about 12" ers. Thanks for the info,happy cutting. E.S.

  10. #10

    Wink

    The mill does fine on oak and hickory, better than I would have thought. As far as how long do the blades last between sharpening well thats kind of like asking how fast something dies when it's shot. The answer is easy it depends. Every log is different as is every animal. I can usally cut all day with 2-3 blades. Also remmeber that if you will be cutting frozen logs they are harder to cut. The woman that does my sharpening puts more of a set to the teeth in the winter for that reason.

    As far as the other saw cutting small logs (around here 12" is small ). They claim that it will cut them just fine. I don't know I've never seen one but like what I see.

    As a side note Woodmizer is another band mill company that is very popular. I know two guys that have them and have seen them in person but IMHO they aren't woth the money. I don't like how they are built and the lumber that comes off of them is no where near as true as what I can cut. Now one thing to remmeber about that statement I was a machinest for 10 years so what is prefectly good lumber in most peoples eyes is just god allfull in mine.

    BWM
    "Spirituality is the ultimate survival skill. When one is primarily on a spiritual quest, the desire for material objects is effectively lessened. This can make an enormous difference to us in the coming trials since we stand a big chance of losing many of our goodies. We will be in states of shock and anguish. Yet if we learn to not mind losing them, there is no loss. Material goods are to Americans as alcohol is to a drunk. In both cases, losing the craving is a benefit." Mike Oehler

    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson, to Archibald Stuart, 1791"

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    Default women do put on sharper teeth in the winter

    LOL, just kiding. Really though thats pretty good info. As a carpenter for over 30 years I know what your talking about good lumber. Just curious, approx. how many board feet can you cut in a 8 hr day? I know it would be more with the larger logs because of the loading time. Just want to get an idea. Is this just a mill for lumber when you need it, or do you run it all the time? Also I think the woodmizer dose'nt have the 4-poster mount. Thanks again for the info. E.S.

  12. #12

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    There again it depends. I cut alot of RR ties and cut them pretty quick. I also have a tractor with a front end loader with forks to move the logs and boards around with. Which is not only a labor saver but a back saver as well. So if your just taking two sides off logs to make a log cabin you'll do a good bit depending on how fast you can get your logs on the mill. I have replaced the factory log ramps with a log that I split in two so I can load several logs on the ramps at a time. A good cant hook is a must!!!!! Chains and a come-along will help you get logs in place, or if you had a chainsaw whinch that would be good. Or if you have an ATV you could skid the logs in place. The value of a tractor with a front end loader/forks can't be under estimated, but it can be done without it, just not as fast.

    BWM
    "Spirituality is the ultimate survival skill. When one is primarily on a spiritual quest, the desire for material objects is effectively lessened. This can make an enormous difference to us in the coming trials since we stand a big chance of losing many of our goodies. We will be in states of shock and anguish. Yet if we learn to not mind losing them, there is no loss. Material goods are to Americans as alcohol is to a drunk. In both cases, losing the craving is a benefit." Mike Oehler

    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson, to Archibald Stuart, 1791"

  13. #13

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    Thanks again for the info.
    I'm glad I can help. I mostly take info from this site, this one of few times I have been able to give info.

    BWM
    "Spirituality is the ultimate survival skill. When one is primarily on a spiritual quest, the desire for material objects is effectively lessened. This can make an enormous difference to us in the coming trials since we stand a big chance of losing many of our goodies. We will be in states of shock and anguish. Yet if we learn to not mind losing them, there is no loss. Material goods are to Americans as alcohol is to a drunk. In both cases, losing the craving is a benefit." Mike Oehler

    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson, to Archibald Stuart, 1791"

  14. #14
    Member smwwoody's Avatar
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    Default saw mill

    Check this place out www.forestryforum.com I was a professional sawyer for many years and can answer any questions you have

    Woody

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    Thumbs up Thanks Woody

    That's a pretty cool site. I'll be doing some reading over there. E.S.

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    I was just thinking about the possible benefits of buying a chainsaw like the logosol mentioned (looks like a great unit) and cutting three sides of the log, leaving one side with the natural rounded side. The "logs" could be notched easily enough and stacked so everything would fit together nice and tight, maybe 8" to 14" of wood rather than 5" to 8" for a full scribe. The inside would be flush. I bought a couple of books on log home construction and one on pole "barn" building. Does anyone have any comments, caveats, or thoughts on this idea?

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    I have been going to buy a mill for the some time and i still havent yet but i will in the next year. I have checked out about every sawmill there is. I am going to get the logasol m-7 mill. It makes perfect lumber and its made from aircraft quality alumanum. It is 110 lbs without the saw. you can move it with the brovo. heres there website http://www.logosol.com/_sawmills/m7/ They have there own forum and everyone that has the mill loves it. They have speacial chainsaw bars and chains so theres only a quarter inch kerff. They are a little slower than the big band saw mills but the the quality is as good or better... Also they have a great video of there mills you can order from there site its free....

  18. #18

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    My buddy's got a Lucas Mill right now, can't remember the specs, but it's very portable but you have to orient the logs manually between the rails of the mill. It's a chain saw mill and we've used it to cut some 24" or so Norfolk pine. Does okay, but it takes 2 people to run it efficiently. The kerf is like a standard big chain saw, so it takes awhile. He's just ordered a Timber King B20 for his big stuff, that mill comes on a trailer; speaking of shipping, all you guys got it pretty good: that B20 gets shipped in a 40' high cube container, which is going to cost about 9,000.00 to get here to Kauai.
    Jim

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    It's a little OT but I saw the special the other night about saws. John Deere makes the most powerful saw on the planet for harvesting trees. It has a cutting head that spins at (I think) 1600 rpm, made of tool steel, weighs several hundred lbs, cuts about a 1.25" kerf, is powered by a 250 hp engine and tilts 360 degrees. The main thing is that it can cut down a 36" diameter tree in less than a second!!! It actually cuts the tree down right before the grippers grab it. They also had a guy on there showing off his 35 hp chainsaw!! It was about 75 lbs, cost about $5K to build and cut through about a 16" log three times (down, up, and back down again) in under 5 seconds. Tim Allen would have been impressed.

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