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Thread: centerpin fly reel

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    Default centerpin fly reel

    Hi guys, While browsing many fishing responses a reply was given about the advantages of centerpin reels on a flyrod.I hope to be fishing the Anchor river near Homer this summer and would like to know if the Anchor if conducive to this type of flyreel. My hopes are for silver salmon if this is relevent.Also what weight of line is good for these fish? Thanks for anyones thoughts.Ed

  2. #2
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyrod View Post
    Hi guys, While browsing many fishing responses a reply was given about the advantages of centerpin reels on a flyrod.I hope to be fishing the Anchor river near Homer this summer and would like to know if the Anchor if conducive to this type of flyreel. My hopes are for silver salmon if this is relevent.Also what weight of line is good for these fish? Thanks for anyones thoughts.Ed
    A center pin is not a fly reel, also the rods are different.
    Center pin reels may look like a fly reel but they are very different animals, with the biggest difference being that most do not have a drag system. You use your hand to apply drag when fighting the fish. Line used on centerpins is monofiliment in the 8-20 pound range, with lighter tippets. For example the Anchor fishes well with 10-12# main line with a 6# leader.
    The rods are very similar to the old noodle rods made famous in the Great Lakes in the 70's. Most rods are in the 11 1/2 to 15 foot range. For the Anchor choose one on the smaller end of the scale.
    Is the Anchor conducive to fishing this style............ Yep!!!!! You can get amazing long no drag drifts on the lower cut bank area, but the rest of the river is quite fishable too.
    I will be on the Kenai Peninsula for the month of September if you want to see first hand how the system works, just drop me a pm.

    Here's a HO taken from the high bank area on a pin setup.



    And another HO from upriver.



    And a nice steelhead hooked in the run above.



    And another from a few pools further upstream.


    And a nice steelhead hooke in the run above.


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    Member monello's Avatar
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    Would this type of reel have any application in a lake? I can see it for moving water. Interesting, I'd like to try 1 before I pass judgement on it.

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by monello View Post
    Would this type of reel have any application in a lake? I can see it for moving water. Interesting, I'd like to try 1 before I pass judgement on it.
    It can be used in still water but is designed for moving water. It's in moving water where the real advantages come out...... longer drag free drifts. Remember the more fish you put your bait/fly in front of the more fish you will catch. While a fly fisher may get 10 to 30 feet of drag free drift I can get up to 10 times the length of drag free drift. It's a lot less work too. I love to fly fish, but it can wear on you especially when fishing faster water. cast...mend...mend...cast
    While with the centerpin it's cast.............................................. .mend.......................................cast
    It does take a little time to get the mechanics of casting and fighting fish though. If you decide to try it, don't get discouraged.

    If you want more info see the guys at World Wide Angler in Anchorage or Trout Fitters in Cooper Landing.

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