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Thread: Recoil Solutions?

  1. #1

    Default Recoil Solutions?

    Another thread got me thinking about this question.

    I am moving from a 7mm Rem Mag to a 300 WSM as my main hunting rifle. The 7mm was a pretty good kicker. After about 20 rounds on the bench I would develop a flinch and be pretty sore the next day (nothing a little Ibuprofin couldn't cure). The 300 WSM is going to be about 25 or so lbs I'm guessing which might push me to the edge of tolerance. I plan on getting a lead sled so I can shoot all day on the bench, but I wonder how it will feel int the field. I never felt my 7mm when I fired at game probably because I was so involved with the situation and usually in a position that allowed better absorbtion of recoil energy.

    I would think that some ingenious fellas would come up with a good recoil absorbtion design to make shooting larger cartridges more fun. Especially when you get the 338's and bigger.

    The first time I fired my lightweight single shot shotgun it really whacked me. Tried it again and flinched bigtime. Absolutley could not bring myself to pull the trigger a third time. Went out and got a spongy slip on recoil pad and it was sweet shootin.

    Soooo, do any of you have any good ideas (besides muzzle breaks etc) to take the jolt out of a big cartridge? Or what's the best recoil pad you know of?

  2. #2
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    Answer Systems makes a good recoil reduction system. From butt pad to muzzle brake.

  3. #3

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    Recoil is something that you learn to work with, not something that goes away. If you want a heavy rifle or you want deafening muzzle breaks then have at it. To me learning to shoot through your recoil issues is much easier to do than folks think. There isn't much of a difference between a 7mm and 300WSM at least to me and I have owned both. With that said nothing says you have to be able to shoot 3 boxes of Magnum calibered ammo in a range session. I would spend some time shooting your gun and really thinking about whats going on, what you feel and where you feel it. You can make small adjustments to the way you shoulder a gun that changes how it recoils on you. Heres a tip...its not gonna hurt you physically in any way so put that out of your mind...grin

  4. #4
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    KDF muzzle brake,been on my .300 mag for 20 years,and I love it.Shoot it loud and proud.

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    Default Muzzle break? If your muzzle is broken..

    Muzzle break? If your muzzle is broken at least fix your muzzle (and recoil and spelling) with a muzzle brake.

    Driven crazy at last

    Lost Sheep (Larry)

  6. #6
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I have had a couple back operations and because of this I can't tolerate heavy recoil. I have hunted with my Benelli R-1 Auto because it is such a soft shooter. However, I won a Howa 300 WSM at the RMEF dinner and decided to play around with it. With the factory stock that thing kicked like a mule, I was unable to shoot more than a couple rounds. I bought a Lead Sled and that thing is worth every penny. Will save you a ton in wasted ammo alone. Plus I bought the Knoxx Axiom V/S Rifle Stock from Knoxx. It has an adjustable stock and a recoil absorbing spring inside the stock. It really soaks up the recoil. Check out their website, if you are near Fairbanks I can let you shot it. One thing the gun moves back into the stock on recoil, you need a scope with good eye relief.
    http://www.knoxx.com/products/Knoxx_Products.php
    my rifle

    Steve

  7. #7

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    Thanks for all the input, I appreciate it.

    If the 300 WSM doesnt kick much more than the 7mm I'll probably be ok in the field with a shot a few follow ups if needed for whatever reason. And with a Lead Sled I can shoot all day long on a bench although it would be nice not to have to use the Lead Sled. But if I go to a larger cal in the future I will probably opt for the 338 RUM and I would definitely want some kind of a recoil reduction system for that.

    AlaskaCub, I guess it depends on wht your def of physical hurt is (grin) and I have worked on technique and will continue to do so.

    I Googled Answer Systems but couldn't find anything?

    A muzzle *brake* will be my last option. Thanks for the spelling tip,, bad habit of mine,, like transposing your for you're. Hopefully it doesn't affect my shooting

    stid2677, that's a very interesting looking rig you got there. Although I am a function over form kind of guy, it's hard to see a set up like that for my hunting rifle. But it is a very intersting concept. Maybe i just need a paradigm adjustment (did I spell that right) I would love to shoot your rig but I'm in Bozeman Montana, although I was to Fairbanks several times with the Air Force.

    Thanks again and still looking for anymore ideas if anyone has one.

  8. #8

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    Lead sleds are not kind to your gun. Guns are made with the understanding that your shoulder moves back at the shot. Clamping the gun into a sled that doesn't move is like running your car into a brick wall. Things tend to break and slip. That's my two lincolns.

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    Member Eastwoods's Avatar
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    Cabelas has a slip on soft rubber butt pad (only about 1/2") that I use some times while shooting my 375 H&H. Works good.

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    I have a sand bag that I put between the rifle and my sholder; it works in shirt sleves. It is about 1" thick. Us wimps need something like that. J.

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    Default Lead Sled

    Quote Originally Posted by woundedknee View Post
    Lead sleds are not kind to your gun. Guns are made with the understanding that your shoulder moves back at the shot. Clamping the gun into a sled that doesn't move is like running your car into a brick wall. Things tend to break and slip. That's my two lincolns.
    Au Contraire - That's what so nice about the Lead Sled, it does move. It just slows the recoil impulse, softening the blow. The old shooting vises were the ones that would eat up scopes and stocks, they just held the gun in place with little or no movement. I've started useing a Lead Sled the last couple years and I really like them. If you loaded the shot on the sled and also put some on top of the rifle to hold it down then you would reduce movement enough that it would cause problems on hard kicking rifles.

    Woody

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    AlaskaCub, I guess it depends on wht your def of physical hurt is (grin) and I have worked on technique and will continue to do so.
    Yeah I guess I mean, its not gonna jump out of your hands and hit you in the head with the barrel...grin

    Recoil is a funny thing, I loaned a buddy a 300WM and ammo for a moose hunt years ago and I had it sighted in perfectly. He had serious issues with recoil (I dont know why). He took it to Cushman and fired it one time at the range and was like 7" high and 7" to the right. He never fired it again.....till his moose hunt. He called in a bull from a long ways out and punched it right behind the shoulder at 200 yards. I asked him later about recoil and he couldn't even recall whether or not it kicked. I laughed and teesed him for years about it. The chiznit is all in your mind, I'd tell him.

  13. #13

    Thumbs up Limbsaver

    I put the limbsaver pad on my 338. It's affordable and takes the sting out. You still don't want to shoot more than a box or 2.

  14. #14
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    It should come as no surprise to anyone here, the lead sled is made to hold several bags of lead shot in the tray. The vary best way to go (not cheap) is a Vias break and a hydro-coil stock. Or you can add one or two mercury recoil reducers to the butt.

    The poor mans way would be to cast a lead weight and hollow out the butt stock and cover the weight with the recoil pad.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  15. #15
    Member Ak Fireman's Avatar
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    I've found that increasing the length of pull can really have an affect on the felt recoil. I also believe that recoil is mostly in the shooters mind accept when there is a real risk of getting injured by the scope or in my case when I would shoot my 416 rigby CZ with the factory American stock my thumb would hit(punch) my nose. I was able to get around this by not laying my thumb over the top of the stock, needless to say the stock would jump and I would have to be reminded what day it was, and where I was at after shooting it. I added two inches to the stock and turned it into a Cadillac to shoot, I then felt safe enough to put a scope on the rifle. I have sense replaced it with a Mcale from Mcmillan with the 3 way adjustable butt plate giving me a LOP of 15.5" making it very comfortable to shoot. My 300 win mag in a Mcmillan Lazzeroni is at 14.5" it to is very comfortable to shoot. My 338 win mag is in the factory XCR at 13.25" and while the recoil doesn't bother me I did have to move the scope as far forward as possible to keep from getting kissed. My friend at Mcmillan was telling me that moving the center of balance away from my shoulder would definitely change how the gun recoiled. He also said my requested LOP sounded a little longer than average, so I went in there and was fitted to the stock and he said that yes I did require a longer stock.

    I guess my point is this. I have such complete trust in comfort for my 300 and my 416 that it is practically second nature to shoot them and while the 338 is not the boomer of the Rigby. I've found it is more difficult for me shoot accuratly because it feels almost toy like. I do however like the lighter weight of it and as long as it doesn't split my brow I will just learn to shoot it better.

    Just my thoughts.......

  16. #16

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    If you use the lead sled use it at you own risk is all I am saying. I work at a sporting goods store and I see a lot of guns come in for repairs after seeing time on the lead sled. The repairs range from slipped scopes, broken scopes, split or broken stocks.
    There are better ways to help with the recoil.

  17. #17
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    One of the most painful rifles I have ever shot was my wife’s Remington model 7 in 260 Rem! I know, it’s unbelievable, even absurd but that dang light little rifle would smack me around something awful until I figured out that the way I was holding the short little thing and crouching down behind it at the bench was causing the stock to literally slap my cheek bone every time I touched one off! As for recoil mitigation devices I have always had good luck with the Pachemeyer brand recoil pads and they actually look pretty good in my opinion. Muzzle brakes are a different deal, and I am not totally against them because they do have their place at the range when sighting in or practicing, but I prefer to have a removable brake that can be replaced by a threaded nut for hunting and barrel cleaning. I have never tried one of the spring type or mercury filled butt stock reducers simply because I don’t wish to carry any more weight than I already am with my wood stock. One other thing you may consider is shooting more often from field positions. With the exception of prone, I find that noticed recoil is substantially less than that experienced at the bench, and besides it is probably the best use of your range time anyway for skill building where it really counts. When I must shoot one of the hard chargers from the bench I make sure to get a short enough stool and get that rifle up high enough that I am in a more natural position and not crouching down or scrunching myself to get off the shot. This has gone along way in preventing “scope eye” flinching and bruised shoulders but even so, about 20 or 30 rounds thru either my 375H&H or 45/70GG will leave me with a purple spot growing on my shoulder the next day.

    In my opinion the very worst thing you can do is to have your barrel drilled ala Marlin guide gun style or have the Magnaporting process done, as both are permanent, less effective than a removable brake, harder to clean and require the shooter to use hearing protection in the field (the ones that like hearing that is).
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  18. #18
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    My wifes 300 WSM does not seem to kick any more than my 30-06.

    Rifle fit and recoil pads will do great things for recoil management.

    My 30-06 I think is a touch lighter than my wifes 300 WSM. They both have quality pads. My 30-06 has a decelerator and the 300 WSM has the factory Winchester ultimate classic recoil pad that is softer than my decelerator pad.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  19. #19
    Member Whelenator's Avatar
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    Default Recoil hurts

    I don't care what anyone says, recoil don't feel so good. I use a Past Recoil strap on pad. I shoot a 35 Whelen, 375 H&H, a 358 Winchester, a 7 Rem Mag, and 7 Wby Mag, at least in my biggest kickers. the 375 is my most brutal, in that it's a remington 700 Custom shop AWR, and weighs just a bit under 8 lbs with scope. it will literally hit you so hard you think your losing teeth. It has a pachmayr decelerator pad, and plus the Past pad i wear, it still hurts some. So, I just shoot a few rounds, maybe not more than a dozen. Then, for continued practice, I shoot another rifle.
    As long as you are confident in the 300 WSM, and it functions and feeds fine, try this approach. you won't ever notice the kick in the field, especially if your shooting at a bear!

  20. #20
    Member Timber Smith's Avatar
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    Default 300 WSM Recoil??

    Recoil is relative and subjective, believe you learn to tolerate it especially if you shoot the big bores or even 12 guage much. Stock design and recoil pads do a lot to alleviate felt recoil. I like to wear a PAST recoil pad when conducting load development off a rest and bags for anything above 30 caliber from the bench. Would not use a led sled or anything to anchor the rifle. Afterall, I figure recoil is one way that Nimrod is letting you know your still alive and all part of the fun of shooting, I want to feel something!!! Not a fan of muzzle breaks but would consider a removable one. I figure the day I can't handle a 30 caliber magnum will be time to age gracefully with a 30-06.


    "AND YE SHALL KNOW THE TRUTH AND THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE."

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