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Thread: Fuel Oil Tubing Question

  1. #1
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    Default Fuel Oil Tubing Question

    I have a 500 gallon diesel fuel oil greer tank with 3/8" OD copper running into house, and to the near future dual fuel wood boiler(underground). The fuel line is the standard set up in Alaska with loops downstream of the filter for a little expansion/give. I also has Lattace guard in front of line to protect it.
    With the price of fuel going up, I'm looking for an alternative fuel line or some suggestions, or just keep doing it that way? I would hate to lose over 1600.00 in fuel if something bad happened(moose,earthquake), and not to mention the contaminated area. I'm wondering if braded line (MSR stove type) would be tough, but I'm not sure if they make any. Or possibly some tough rubber hose (squirrel proof) That had more flex and alot easier to run than copper. Any ideas or advice would be great, on product locations and types I'm sure it would help others too.. THANKS

  2. #2

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    I Had A Customer Once Who Requested A Fuel Line Done In Stainless Steel Line, Untill He Seen What It Cost For Material..copper Is Fine Just Make Sure You Sleeve With Another Pipe If You Bury It...i Have Had To Go Unthaw Many When A Customer Has Let Their Filter Go And The Tank Was Run Low,water Gets Mixed With The Fuel..make Sure Your Tank Is On A Good Stand...

  3. #3
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Question fuel line

    If your still looking for braided line you look in an automotive performance catalog?? I would just insulate the 3/8 with pipe insulation and use zip ties or elec. tape to wrap it where needed and run the fuel line tight against the building or bury at least 12 inches deep. You probably dont want to use flexible fuel line exept for maybe if your using a (tiger loop)fuel de-erator that comes with said fuel lines. If you have a furnace or boiler in your home a flexible fuel line could get kinked or may collapse under vacuum of the fuel fump and shut you down. Also city code might require copper tubing.

  4. #4
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    Default

    If you live in an area where it gets extremely cold (-20/-40), fuel oil can get so thick that it will not flow in a 3/8 tubing. I knew a person in Tok that used 2 inch water pipe because there winter were down in the -50 for weeks at a times.

    Alaska Rubber may have what your looking for.

  5. #5
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akgrizcr View Post
    I have a 500 gallon diesel fuel oil greer tank with 3/8" OD copper running into house, and to the near future dual fuel wood boiler(underground). The fuel line is the standard set up in Alaska with loops downstream of the filter for a little expansion/give. I also has Lattace guard in front of line to protect it.
    With the price of fuel going up, I'm looking for an alternative fuel line or some suggestions, or just keep doing it that way? I would hate to lose over 1600.00 in fuel if something bad happened(moose,earthquake), and not to mention the contaminated area. I'm wondering if braded line (MSR stove type) would be tough, but I'm not sure if they make any. Or possibly some tough rubber hose (squirrel proof) That had more flex and alot easier to run than copper. Any ideas or advice would be great, on product locations and types I'm sure it would help others too.. THANKS
    The copper is more than durable enough.
    Wrap the line with tight fitting foam insulation and go with it.

    You can use zip strips or electrical tape (when it's warm.)
    Use quality 3m tape that will stay put and not unravel in the cold.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Insulation is bear bait. So is rubber propane hose. There's no need to insulate outdoors. You may want to on the inside if condensation builds on the line. I've never needed to.

    Did I mention that foam insulation is bear bait? I'm not kidding. Your copper won't hold up to a bear, but a bear won't mess with it if it's not insulated. Bears like gasoline, but I've never had a problem with fuel oil. Add some rubber? Goodbye.

  7. #7
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Default

    Pid is right on the money. This is why I never recommend rubber fuel line to my customers. Bears, squirrels, rabbits and porcupines love to chew on it and insulation.

    Both of my commercial buildings are plumbed with solid 1/2" black iron pipe. You have to use your smarts to plumb it so there is enough up down room with the winter/summer movement of your tank, but it's pretty easy. On my house I have copper and have had no issues.

    I have a neighbor that has a nice setup using black iron pipe right up to within 1' of his filter. He then has a fuel hose with a stainless woven jacket around it connecting the fuel filter and the pipe for flexibility.

    I believe he had the hose made up at the Parker Store on International in Anchorage. There is also a Jakovich Parker Store in Wasilla and I believe in Fairbanks. They have everything you could imagine in tubes and fittings.

  8. #8

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    Install an oil safety valve at the tank. It will not open without suction.

  9. #9
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    Default Be aware of the limits to an OSV

    The oil safety valve ( OSV38) is a great idea & a great product, but will only work on systems with mechanical fuel pumps that will pull a vacuum of at least 2".
    For gravity flow systems to a vaporizing oil heater it will only serve to block the line.

    I'll also place my vote for the standard 3/8'" o.d. ( 1/4" type L ) copper tubing. I've had it at my place south of Copper Center for over 30 yrs-- in temps well down below -50F. Never, ever had flow problems even that cold with #1 fuel. #2 is a disaster waiting to happen, and should never, ever be allowed to mix in with your #1 ( no matter how small of qty ).

    If you're really worried about Critters possibly damaging your piping and allowing a spill, just put a shut off valve at the outlet port of the tank, and shut it off when you're not there.

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