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Thread: Range finders

  1. #1
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    Default Range finders

    What's thr best range finder for bow hunting? What's the best one for both bow and rifle?

  2. #2

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    I use a Leica CRF 1200 for rifle hunting, I suppose it would work for bowhunting too. This is the first and only range finder I have ever owned and I really like it. I bought mine from Doug at Cameraland.

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    Default Customer reviews

    I've had two, Nikon & Leupold. I didn't like the Leupold, so I bought a Nikon. I have tried quite a few though and found that the Customer Reviews on Cabelas and Bass Pro Shops web pages are fairly accurate. Hope this helps.

  4. #4
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    Default Leica 1200

    This is a great rangefinder. I mostly use mine for bowhunting. It is small enough to use with one hand, clear, and accurate.

  5. #5
    Member AK145's Avatar
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    Default Nikon

    I have a Nikon Monarch and it seems to work well.

  6. #6
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Default

    I use a Nikon 440. It does everything I need for bowhunting.

  7. #7
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    Default range finder

    Leica is the leader in this field. That being said the angle compensating models are very desirable, especially in bow hunting. I have both Leica and Leupold. I didn't care for the low end leupold model, it didn't work well in the rain. Leica's don't seem to have such issues or not as much.

  8. #8

    Default Range Finder

    Defineltly Leica, have the 900 model. Both the 900 and 1200 are great. Can't hit anything at 900 so 1200 is really useless for me! Doug at Cameraland is best bet. Has a winter special on right now.

  9. #9
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default

    Remember that those long ranges are the best range with clear blue skies ect... I have owned 4 range finders, Leica is the best hands down. Nikon, Busnell, and even Leupold all let me down. My Leica 1200 CRF works every time. Just range but most times that is all I need. Even with my Leica 1200, the longest I have been able to range an animal is 900 plus yards.

    Steve

  10. #10
    Member Matt M's Avatar
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    Default

    I Have used Bushnell and Nikon. They both work great. If you are looking for an angle compensated model for both bow and rifle...you may find there are many choices but only 1 clear cut winner.

    Matt

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt M View Post
    I Have used Bushnell and Nikon. They both work great. If you are looking for an angle compensated model for both bow and rifle...you may find there are many choices but only 1 clear cut winner.

    Matt
    Which one is the winner? And Why? Looking to get one of these units and get some practice with it before fall. Thanks!

  12. #12
    Member Matt M's Avatar
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    Default

    My criteria:
    Be effective for bow and rifle.
    Be able to compensate for angle.
    Water Proof.

    If weight is not an issue...Bushnell Elite 1500. It can do what you want for close up and steep and you can set it up to match your caliber and speed for accurate hold over.

    Bushnell makes one for 100 yards or less, but I can't see how I would use it for a rifle. Leica is good but too pricey. Leupold is too busy and needs to be re thought and then redesigned. Optilogic needs to be more stout. Nikon is good too.

    Matt

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt M View Post
    My criteria:
    Be effective for bow and rifle.
    Be able to compensate for angle.
    Water Proof.

    If weight is not an issue...Bushnell Elite 1500. It can do what you want for close up and steep and you can set it up to match your caliber and speed for accurate hold over.

    Bushnell makes one for 100 yards or less, but I can't see how I would use it for a rifle. Leica is good but too pricey. Leupold is too busy and needs to be re thought and then redesigned. Optilogic needs to be more stout. Nikon is good too.

    Matt
    My critieria is spot on with yours, but weight & price/value are always an issue. Where does that leave me?

  14. #14
    Member Matt M's Avatar
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    Default

    It leaves you making your best choice, finding a good average retail price (Cabela's), then working Ebay really hard. I saved a ton so it was worth it.

    Matt

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt M View Post
    It leaves you making your best choice, finding a good average retail price (Cabela's), then working Ebay really hard. I saved a ton so it was worth it.

    Matt
    No worries on that, finding a deal is the easy part, just not sure what model to go after. Was hoping to hear what others experiences were with specific models. What they like, or didn't like, why they chose it over another, etc.
    Last edited by 1911-MW; 04-02-2008 at 09:55. Reason: typo

  16. #16
    Member Fireman JB's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KWP View Post
    I've had two, Nikon & Leupold. I didn't like the Leupold, so I bought a Nikon. I have tried quite a few though and found that the Customer Reviews on Cabelas and Bass Pro Shops web pages are fairly accurate. Hope this helps.
    Same here. I had the new fancy Leupold RX2 that compensated for angles and it is not user friendly! It also wouldn't read through screen. Like ground blind window mesh. So I returned it and bought a Nikon Monarch and love it. I like the idea of having the angle compensation so I might get a Bushnell with the ARC and put it through it's paces since they've come out.

    Cliff notes, I own and like the Nikon.

  17. #17
    Member Matt M's Avatar
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    Default

    I did go with Bushnell Arc.

    No Complaints.

    Matt

  18. #18

    Default Thinking about selling some rangefinders

    I was ebaying that bushnell arc 1000 and it looks like I could sell my Leica LRF 900 and break even or perhaps gain a few bucks, but also get a compact package that does angle adjustments as well. Probably sell my Leupold RX-1 as well. Keep me posted guys on how you like that ARC.

    Thanks

  19. #19
    Member Stogey's Avatar
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    Default Cabelas 800

    Bought the Cabelas (aka Bushnell).
    Simple.
    Something like 5-800 yards advertised - I found it's more realisticly 8ish to however steady your hand is.
    For me -- hand held to about 200... need to rest it on something further out.

    Here's the instructions for use:
    Aim - Cross Hairs on 'target'. Push the button. You get Range.

    In heavy mist or rain - notso good though. Still works to about 15 yards-ish.
    By heavy, the mist/fog was thick enough that I couldn't identify people by their faces at 20 yards. 30 yards, they were gone.

  20. #20
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    Default angle compensation

    I see a lot of people willing to sell a perfectly good rangefinder and shell out several hundred dollars more for one of the new "angle compensation" rangefinders. It's a nice concept but from my experience it's not really all that necessary. What I mean is that for the most part just knowing a few simple rules of thumb will keep you in the kill zone.

    Shooting a reasonably flat shooting bow (250-300+fps) simply holding one pin-width low will keep you in the kill zone on anything you can walk down, and lowering your point of aim by 5% (one half of 10%, which is easy to calculate on the fly) will keep you in the kill zone from there up to slope angles you need pretty much need a rope and harness to make it down.

    Same goes for rifles. I shot a goat at 335 yards two years ago. I knew my rifle was sighted to be a few inches low at 300, and I was shooting up a pretty steep ridge, so I just held right on. Dead goat.

    I will say it was important to know the range, so a laser rangefinder is a huge step forward. But angle compensation is a very small step forward. Furthermore, right now it seems like you still have to pay top dollar to get a reliable and easily usable angle compensating rangefinder. My advice would be to save the money you'd spend to get angle compensation, and invest it in getting one that ranges further, and is waterproof. Those are two things that REALLY matter. On that 335 yard goat my Nikon 440 would not range it, but my friend's Leica fortunately did. That shot would have been a lot more of a guess, and I very possibly might not have taken it, without knowing that it was 300 yards out, not 400 or 200. Distances in the mountains (or wide open tundra) can be very tricky! Since then I upgraded to a Nikon Monarch 800 that I am very happy with.

    Aside from not being waterproof, Nikon 440 was a great rangerfinder except for one thing. It was extremely reliable and ranged everything very accurately, but I did not like the 8X eyepiece. Basically, the field of view was a bit small, especially at archery distances, so finding the target could take a bit too long, especially in brush. 4X or 6X is entirely adequate. Strangely enough the Nikon 800 comes with a 6X eyepiece, whereas the 440 model comes with an 8X. Go figure.

    By the way, in setting up a FITA shoot we used the Nikon 800 to measure 90m (about 97 yards) and later checked it with a measuring tape. The Nikon was off by about 1 ft at nearly 100 yards. Pretty good, I'd say.

    What I'm REALLY saving my money for is a high-quality, light weight, binocular/rangefinder combo. Leupold took a weak stab at it in recent years, and Leica has a very spendy model out, but when they come out with really high quality glass coupled with a rangefinder as good as the Monarch 800 for less than $1000, I'm going to take a serious look. And I won't care if it includes angle compensation or not. I don't think it's too far down the road either. One to five years maybe?

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