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Thread: Growing Potatoes

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    Default Growing Potatoes

    Can you use the potatoes from your pantry that have sprouted eyes to plant in your garden? I've read that you can, however, I've also read that you should only use "seed" potatoes. Anyone here have any experience with this? Thanks.

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    Member Bear Buster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobblehead View Post
    Can you use the potatoes from your pantry that have sprouted eyes to plant in your garden? I've read that you can, however, I've also read that you should only use "seed" potatoes. Anyone here have any experience with this? Thanks.
    This is all I know about that:
    Purchase only certified seed tubers for planting to help reduce disease problems. Saving your own seed potatoes is generally not worthwhile because viruses and diseases often show up the next year. Seed potatoes should be firm and unsprouted. Use seed pieces that have at least one good eye and are about the size of 1 to 2-inch cubes. Seed pieces should be cut three to five days before planting to allow the cut surfaces to heal.
    Plant potatoes in late winter (see planting chart). Plants will resist a light frost, but hard frosts and freezes may set back growth. Potatoes prefer a cool spring and moisture throughout the growing season.
    Plant potatoes in furrows with the cut side down 3 to 5 inches deep. Later crops should be planted 5 to 6 inches deep. Space the seed pieces 8 to 10 inches apart. Pull a ridge of soil over each row when planting. Twelve pounds of seed potatoes will plant 100 feet of row.
    Another method of growing potatoes is above-ground in mulch. Place seed pieces on top of the soil or 1 inch below soil level, and cover with a 12- to 18-inch layer of straw or pine needles. The tubers will form in the mulch. Harvesting is considerably easier using this method. Move the straw aside to harvest early potatoes. Replace straw to allow plants to produce more potatoes until the vines die.

  3. #3

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    I've saved my own seed potatoes without trouble, but you want to check yours for signs of disease too (and it helps if you keep records of any problems the plants they came from had, if you grew them). Ideally, you want seed to come from your best plants.

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    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

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    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    I've always used sprouted potatoes out of the pantry for seed without problems.

    I'm guessing that the certified seed potato advocates pushing seed potatoes has more to do with The (formerly) Almighty Greenback Dollar than with reality.
    Now what ?

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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    It isn't likly to be a problem. I know seed potatoes are usually sprayed with fungusides and stuff to prevent the spread of disease. Many people use pantry potatoes year after year without any problem.

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    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    Default seed

    I always use my own seed potatoes. Mine have been passed down through 3 generations in my family now, and I intend to pass them down to my kids as well. I don't know what variety they are, but they're some of the best potatoes I've ever had. My kids can tell the difference when we run out and start eating "store" potatoes.

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    Member grcg's Avatar
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    Default Potatoes are a big industry here

    The Cooperative Extention STRONGLY discourages people from planting grocery store potatoes for fear of disease.

    I have heard that in years past, disease brought in from grocery store planted potatoes has traveled to kill off the fields of local commercial potato growers. I don't remember specifically what they do to kill it off and prevent it from spreading...but I remember it sounding catastrophic. And they have to go in and erradicate it from private home gardens they find it in too. ugh.

    If you look in your seed catalogs - they aren't even allowed to ship potatoes here.

    There are lots of local farmers and greenhouses that sell potato starts. Better safe than decimating someone else's livelyhood.

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    I almost don't want to reply to this post, my blood pressure goes through the roof, just thinking about this problem.

    We Alaskans had the brag of being disease free for potato blight, until a few years ago.

    Now I know it is a benefit to a few companies outside to destroy anything that we produce here at home (just look what they did to the dairy farmers). Shipping potatoes to Alaska is like shipping snow to us from outside. Nobody produces a better potato in this world than we do!

    As we all know the poly-tick-shuns don't give a rats about Alaskans or Alaska, what they do care about is the money lobbest will provide to them.

    I think a total ban on the importation of potatoes from outside is called for before it's to late. Or the refusal to buy anything but Alaskan grown @ the super markets will end our fears.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  10. #10

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    Another question...
    Do potatoes have to flower before they will produce potatoes? Or is polination only required to produce seeds (not "seed" as in eyes)?

  11. #11

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    Never mind, I found the answer, actually 5 answers about the size of large eggs.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default Speaking of taters...

    Once upon a time, there used to be a product sold as a compost bin that was a rolled up black plastic sheet with a bunch of large holes in it. Very similar thickness plastic as those little rollup sleds they sell at the dept. store every winter, but this stuff was about 3' wide and probably about 10' long.

    Anyhow, it was perfect for growing taters. You set it up by the directions into a circular compost bin, but you fill it up with soil and place your seed taters just inside of the holes as you fill it. At the end of the season, it will be completely covered with the tater plants all around the outside, and when you break it open and start harvesting, you have about 20 cubic feet of tater-filled soil all in one spot.

    My original purchase of a roll of this stuff back in the early 90's has since been retired from wear & tear and I can't seem to find a replacement anywhere. Anyone ever seen a product like this around anymore?
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobblehead View Post
    Never mind, I found the answer, actually 5 answers about the size of large eggs.

    haha. This is funny haha.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    I almost don't want to reply to this post, my blood pressure goes through the roof, just thinking about this problem.

    We Alaskans had the brag of being disease free for potato blight, until a few years ago.

    Now I know it is a benefit to a few companies outside to destroy anything that we produce here at home (just look what they did to the dairy farmers). Shipping potatoes to Alaska is like shipping snow to us from outside. Nobody produces a better potato in this world than we do!

    As we all know the poly-tick-shuns don't give a rats about Alaskans or Alaska, what they do care about is the money lobbest will provide to them.




    I think a total ban on the importation of potatoes from outside is called for before it's to late. Or the refusal to buy anything but Alaskan grown @ the super markets will end our fears.

    What did outsiders do to kill the dairies.

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Once upon a time, there used to be a product sold as a compost bin that was a rolled up black plastic sheet with a bunch of large holes in it. Very similar thickness plastic as those little rollup sleds they sell at the dept. store every winter, but this stuff was about 3' wide and probably about 10' long.

    My original purchase of a roll of this stuff back in the early 90's has since been retired from wear & tear and I can't seem to find a replacement anywhere. Anyone ever seen a product like this around anymore?

    Hoop compost bins are still around. Here is a link to one.

    A method like this that my mom used and I am planning on using this summer is to drill 2 inch holes in the sides of a trash can and plant in layers. Come harvest time you dump the trash can out onto a tarp and pull out the potatos and then shovel the soil back into the trash can for winter storage or put it into the compost if there is a concern about recycling the soil.

  16. #16
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Some people plant them in old tires. not sure what they would taste like, might be a bit rubbery. But I did hear they produse a great crop and make a good lawn fixture plant.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    so who has seed taters?
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    To answer my own question... Risses Green house of CHSR will have seeders by friday.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    Some people plant them in old tires. not sure what they would taste like, might be a bit rubbery. But I did hear they produse a great crop and make a good lawn fixture plant.
    I tried the tire thing last year and had high expectations. However, I ran into an unexpected problem. I mixed generous amounts of fish meal into the soil after I planted them. When the meal started breaking down, I kept getting raided by foxes that were digging around inside the tire trying to find the fish and as a result kept digging up my seed.
    Now what ?

  20. #20

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    Plant Kingdom has quite a variety of seeders. I was there last weekend.

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