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Thread: Bank Fishing With Bobbers

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    Default Bank Fishing With Bobbers

    What is the basic technique for bank fishing for salmon, with bobbers? Do you just estimate the water depth and then hope your lure/bait is in the right place, or is there a specific way to keep your lure/bait consistently near the bottom? What does a simple bobber setup look like? Also, is a bobber and lure (before the use of bait is authorized) effective, or should I just stick to cranking lures?

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    Default bobbers...

    I seldom see it, but I read about it on these posts from time to time. They are used extensively in still water (ie. Homer Spit/ the fishing hole) where the fish go around and around and then run into the baited presentation held by the bobber.

    As far as the rivers go, I've never observed it. Most anglers seem satisfied that the fish are going to journey by right in front of where they are casting, and so they don't use a bobber due it drifting away.

    Most of baited fishing is by the touch, and keeping sensitivity on the finger instead of the eye is more of the norm...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

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    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Default slip bobbers

    Depending on the river you will be best served by using slip bobbers. They work best for kings & silvers in streches of water where you know the bottom depth, especially for kings.
    If you know a the depth of a hole is 9' you set your bobber to about 8'6" & let it continually float over the hole. If fishing a spinning rod you start above the hole & keep your bail open, paying just enough line to let the bait float without resistance, but not having so much line sitting there you can't set the hook. Flloat it till the end of the hole reel in & do it again. If the water is deeper or faster you may have to attach a split shot or two to keep it down & the bobber upright.
    Works easier for silvers as they aren't as hard to get to come up or the depth doesnt' have to be as good.
    Try this site for more info on bobbers http://www.hloutdoors.com/
    Have fun

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    Member TYNMON's Avatar
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    Floats, aka bobbers are used widespread in the lower Anchor R King fishery and lower Deep Cr and Ninilchik Rivers.

    I have used them alot in all different water and they are quite effective. In the NW there use is wide spread and highly specialized. The only time they are less efffective then drifiting bait is when the bottom is very shallow or variable. For fishing the tide they are perfect though.

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    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    Bobber fishing in moving water is a good presentation technique for grabby bottoms or mixed-flow (eddies, slots) situations.

    A basic fixed depth bobber setup would go something like this...Dink Float (or other adjustable, fixed-depth float) 2-5' above a weight, then 8"-16" of leader to your bait of choice. The leaders are short to both keep the bait at the desired depth as well as prevent missed bites.

    Sliding bobber setups use a free-running bobber that is depth-set by the use of a bobber-stop. Bobber-stops are usually thin monofilament or cotton, nailknotted around the mainline anywhere from 3' to 18' above the weight. This allows the user to cast a rig in compact form, yet present at deeper depths than fixed bobbers.

    Bobber and jig setups are great for coho and steelhead. While this technique has been in use for decades in both the PNW and Great Lakes regions, Alaska seems to have let this one slip under the rug. It is a great way to catch tidewater kings, as well as coho and steelhead anywhere in the river system.

    Mark

  6. #6

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    Bobber & bait/jig is a very easy and effective technique for Kings, Silvers & Steelhead. You want your offering about 1 ft off the bottom. If your float is laying on it's side the bait is dragging on the bottom. Lower the bobber stop so the float rides upright. This is a good technique to learn in slower moving water, or rivers with a lot of snags. Bobber goes down and you have a fish on. It's much easier than drift fishing.
    To begin with slide a bobber stop up the main line, slide on a small plastic bead, then a slip bobber (ESB), then a small egg sinker or in-line weight, and then tie on a number 7 barrel swivel. To the swivel you can attach an 18 - 24 inch leader with a 3/0 hook or Jig.
    Check out the diagram in the link below:

    http://pnwws.com/cgi-bin/firstbiteji...d=7127606.9863

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKMarmot View Post
    Depending on the river you will be best served by using slip bobbers. They work best for kings & silvers in streches of water where you know the bottom depth, especially for kings.
    If you know a the depth of a hole is 9' you set your bobber to about 8'6" & let it continually float over the hole. If fishing a spinning rod you start above the hole & keep your bail open, paying just enough line to let the bait float without resistance, but not having so much line sitting there you can't set the hook. Flloat it till the end of the hole reel in & do it again. If the water is deeper or faster you may have to attach a split shot or two to keep it down & the bobber upright.
    Works easier for silvers as they aren't as hard to get to come up or the depth doesnt' have to be as good.
    Try this site for more info on bobbers http://www.hloutdoors.com/
    Have fun
    This is how I do it too. With the exception that I my bobber for the bait to hit bottom at the shallowest part of the drift. Then I also may go shallower as I will give my bait 18" of play with regards to distance from the bottom. The strikes are harder when the fish comes up for the bait.

    I have caught kings (largest 35 pounds) under the A street bridge in ship creek with this method during high tide. Water was 8-10 feet deep and I set the bobber for around 6 or 7 feet.

    Had some good fishing for steelhead in sept when bait was legal in the kasilof. Used eggs under a bobber at kroto creek mouth and caught five steelies one day with the biggest being 28.5 inches. I was going to mount one if it was 30"+ but missed the mark. Largest I have seen caught from the Kasilof is 29". I have ate a couple from there but would keep 24-25 inchers (most common size) for eating.

    Of course spit pond kings, herring chopped in 1" long chunks (purple pack?extra large) or raw or cooked shrimp (60-90 count 1-2 shrimp on a 5/0 hook)?

    I also like to use raw or cooked shrimp (90-100 count) under a bobber at the eklutna tailrace for silvers. One shrimp on a 3/0 hook, or a 1/0 if I am fooling around with 6# line.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    Member TYNMON's Avatar
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    Sometimes I use a 6" dropper leader for my weight and let my weight drag to slow down the bait presentation for kings.... This is deadly and typically requires 3/4 ouze of wieght and a very very short leader and some boyant drift bobbers to keep the eggs off the bottom.

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    Default Bobbers

    I have used the technique described by steelieguy and it worked great on Silvers in a few areas of the Kasilof and other rivers I've tried it in. I used eggs and judged the depth by using a sinker, about the weight of the eggs and hook, and let it drift as steelieguy described. If the bobber is sideways, you're riding the bottom. Find the depth with the sinker, then adjust it a foot off the bottom and tie on the hook and eggs. Watch and listen for the KERPLUNK when a silver hits it. Worked great along trenches and through holes. I don't fish much with eggs any longer, but I might just try it again this year since you reminded me how much fun it was.

    MM

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfga11 View Post
    What is the basic technique for bank fishing for salmon, with bobbers? Do you just estimate the water depth and then hope your lure/bait is in the right place, or is there a specific way to keep your lure/bait consistently near the bottom? What does a simple bobber setup look like? Also, is a bobber and lure (before the use of bait is authorized) effective, or should I just stick to cranking lures?
    Read thru this old thread from 2006.... it's got detailed rigging instructions along with on-the-water results from a newby to bobber/egg fishing.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ead.php?t=1578
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    its one of the best way to catch salmon in small streams period. I do it with a fly rod because I enjoy fighting fish on a fly rod more and because floating lines and long rods allow you to mend making the best drag free drift possible, which is very important to its success. Typically I use a 9 or 10 foot leader 2 split shot, a weighted nymph (brightly colored often) and a strike indicator (bobber). It works especially well on negative fish because you can delicately present smaller offerings.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post
    Had some good fishing for steelhead in sept when bait was legal in the kasilof. Used eggs under a bobber at kroto creek mouth and caught five steelies one day with the biggest being 28.5 inches. I was going to mount one if it was 30"+ but missed the mark. Largest I have seen caught from the Kasilof is 29". I have ate a couple from there but would keep 24-25 inchers (most common size) for eating.

    I'm assuming that was back in the hatchery days, currently fishing with bait closes september 1 when the kasilof goes to 1 single hook artifical. Also you man not retain a steelhead/rainbow trout below the sterling highway. And it is illegal to remove a steelhead from the water.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member Jessals Fishing's Avatar
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    I have had alot of success with small river silvers on a bobber and eggs. So much so that I'm gonna try some topwater bass poppers cause they will continuously strike at the bobber. I''ve heard some mention about using a float and fly for steelies on the smaller rivers to the south. Also a very good technique.

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    Default strike indicators

    isn't a strike indicator a bobber? most boats drifting for trout on the Kenai are using strike indicators with a bead about 6' below.
    should work from the bank, just have to find a good drop off.

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post

    Had some good fishing for steelhead in sept when bait was legal in the kasilof. Used eggs under a bobber at kroto creek mouth and caught five steelies one day with the biggest being 28.5 inches. I was going to mount one if it was 30"+ but missed the mark. Largest I have seen caught from the Kasilof is 29". I have ate a couple from there but would keep 24-25 inchers (most common size) for eating.

    .

    Your answer was in your question AKPM.

    It was whenever bait was legal in Sept. and it was legal to keep them.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default Jig heads..

    I have heard a few people say that pink jig heads fished under a bobber was a killer technique for silvers. I am sure it depends on the type of water, but they were pretty emphatic about how well it works. Below is a link to the type of jig heads I have heard about. Finding the right depth in the water colum would be crucial. But it does look like an easy way to fish. Perhaps to easy.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...&redirect=true
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    About 95% of my Alaskan fishing is done using floats and centerpin gear. A centerpin reel looks like a big fly reel but has no drag and free spools line out when the float drifts down stream. When the float goes down you stop the spool with your hand and set the hook, drag is applied with your either hand depending on your preference. Rods are tipically longer 12 to 15 feet.
    Having grown up on Lake Ontario fishing for steelhead and salmon this is by far the most deadly technique for catching any fish in flowing water. With a centerpin you have the ability to have long drag free drifts, much longer than with a spinning reel or fly gear. So you put your bait in front of many more fish. You can also reach fish in the middle of the flow that the fly guys can't get to.
    I first came to AK in '03 and met a fellow on the Anchor that was fishing a fly rod and I asked if I could slide in below him, he said sure.
    The run was an outside bend with over hanging willows. I flipped my float under the willows and let it drift right against the bank, Fish On!!!
    The fellow now a good friend was interested in the gear I was using so I spend some time describing the equipment and showing him how to use it. He took a few drifts and thought it was pretty cool. We parted company and I didn't see him again until the following year. To my surprise he was fishingwith a float rod and centerpin!! Turns out he's now addicted to the float fishing life style. Since then there is an underground centerpining revolution going on in Alaska. The boys at World Wide Angler in Anchorage and Alaska Trout Fitters in Cooper Landing have stared to carry some gear, and they fish with it quite a bit now.
    This technique if done correctly will out fish fly gear 10:1. Each year I have fly fishermen ask what it is that I'm doing to catch so many fish!! I spend a lot of time discussing and demonstrating gear on the river each year. For fishing big kings in big water the best gear to float fish with is a good quality baitcaster on a 11 to 12 foot heavy float blank. This is what is used most in the North West.
    Here are some links to centerpinning resources.

    http://www.questoutdoors.net/phpBB2/

    http://www.floatfishing.net/

    http://flyandfloatfishing.com/centerpin.htm


    And some gear pictures.







    The gear in action.



    The poor soul I corrupted in '03


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    How far do the Center Pin reels cast, and are they easy to use? I take it your using monofilament or braided line?
    Last edited by Steelieguy; 03-26-2008 at 11:26. Reason: spelling

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steelieguy View Post
    How far do the Center Pin reels cast, and are they easy to use? I take it your using monofilament or braided line?
    They take a little getting used to but with some practice it is quite easy to cast 100' or more. Mono is most often used as it floats better than braid. This makes it easier to stay in contact with your float with little slack when you need to set the hook.

    There are several casting styles and most newbies start off by side casting and then progress from there. When I taught Billy & Dusty@ Troutfitters to pin they were able to learn to side cast 1/2 way across the upper Kenai in about 15 or 20 minutes of instruction.


    Casting videos

    http://flyandfloatfishing.com/centerpin_videos.htm

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post
    Your answer was in your question AKPM.

    It was whenever bait was legal in Sept. and it was legal to keep them.
    Thats why I assumed, more trying to educate people who don't bother to read regulations
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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