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Thread: trading bay

  1. #1
    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    Default trading bay

    anyone ever run across from kenai over to trading bay and up the chakachatna river in an inboard jetboat? i imagine the window of calmness is a fairly tight one during a slack tide but it dosent look like to far a crossing 30 miles or so from the kenai river. is there a closer place to launch? ayone ever run up to the lake?

  2. #2

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    You are clearly on a death wish.....

  3. #3
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    Default

    Interesting comment.

    Back in the 60's my grandfather had a set net site in trading bay, and we would sometimes go up there in 18' dories with 20hp outboards for a picnic. We never got very far, and I was just a kid, so I don't remember much of it, but I don't remember it being dangerous.

  4. #4

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    Agreed. I know more than a few people who have done the crossing. Same story, over and over. Flat on either side near the shore, prayed/found religion in the middle. All of these folks were in more seaworthy boats than an inboard jet river boat. It can be done, and is on occasion, but the risk is huge. All that tide, current and wind make for some really unpredictable water.

  5. #5

    Default There used to be a cannery...

    on Chisik Island. Still there but un-operational for years. My buddy has been a commercial drift net fisherman in Cook Inlet for 25 years now. He started out by having a set net site on Chisik. They very often made the trip to Kenai in their flat bottom aluminum dory w/twin 40's. They new how to read the weather & tides and made quite a few trips with wife and kids. Those set net dories have high bows, better than jet river boats I imagine. It can be done, but better have the right boat for it. I think the trip to Chisik is about 30 miles; not sure anymore. Just a way of life for those folks back then.
    Jim

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    on Chisik Island. Still there but un-operational for years. My buddy has been a commercial drift net fisherman in Cook Inlet for 25 years now. He started out by having a set net site on Chisik. They very often made the trip to Kenai in their flat bottom aluminum dory w/twin 40's. They new how to read the weather & tides and made quite a few trips with wife and kids. Those set net dories have high bows, better than jet river boats I imagine. It can be done, but better have the right boat for it. I think the trip to Chisik is about 30 miles; not sure anymore. Just a way of life for those folks back then.
    Jim
    I could probably be convinced that I could make it in my C-dory22....but why would I want to go look at some dumpy cannery when there are perfectly good halibut on this side of the inlet to catch.

  7. #7
    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    Default moose hunting

    was my primary reason for asking about the crossing how navigable the river is if anyone knew. no reason to go over there for fishing. the area though looks like its permit only so that pretty much answers teh question of me going over that way. im sure that the crossing can be done at the right time a guy just has to pick his time. cant tell me that its rough out there 24/7. anyway i wont be going over there cause of the permit only thing. ill have to find another close yet far away area to hunt this year.

  8. #8
    Member ocnfish's Avatar
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    Exclamation From the air ...

    I pass over trading bay many times a year on my way to southwest or down the west side of the inlet for clams or salmon etc. in my C-180. The river that has the fish is the McCarther (?sp). My Super Cub friends tell me there are small strips and when they go there it is for Red Salmon. It also looks good for hunting. From what I can see there is a lot of shallow water, lots of beach when the tide is out. The tidal rips are appear to be strong when the tide is running so you would probably time the crossing for high tide going in or out. That would require a 12 hour stay. To my recolledtion I have never seen any river boats up the river. The only boats I have seen are at the north end of the bay, fishing skifs probably belong to someone in Tyonek.

    I do see boats a little further down the inlet at the Kustutan (?sp) I go there for silvers and usually do quite well in the July timeframe. It has about the color of the Little Su and about 1/2 the volume of water. I think that it is a shorter run from Kenai but still a journey not to be taken lightly.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by akriverrat View Post
    was my primary reason for asking about the crossing how navigable the river is if anyone knew. no reason to go over there for fishing. the area though looks like its permit only so that pretty much answers teh question of me going over that way. im sure that the crossing can be done at the right time a guy just has to pick his time. cant tell me that its rough out there 24/7. anyway i wont be going over there cause of the permit only thing. ill have to find another close yet far away area to hunt this year.
    nobody said it was rough 24/7. You could cross the bering sea to russia on the right day in your boat. The question is how wise is it? We all take risks when we're out. I was just trying to help out with what I have heard. An early morning high tide at slack before the sun comes out is the obvious best timing. But if you did decide to try it sometime and it kicked up on you I will guarantee one thing. You will be feeling really puny in a riverboat. My buddy had some "fun" last summer crossing in his 26' glasply. He said it was basically flat on either side each time he crossed only to find it pretty **** big in the middle. He has twin 140's and can do about 40 mph if he wants so speed didn't help him at all. Hope this helped.

  10. #10

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    It is just too far for speed to really be any factor. Speed can really help close to shore though when something kicks up. I have never even thought about all the way over there, but I have thought about a run from Seward to Homer. There is a lot of protection, a lot of fishing, and potentially a lot of time looking out the window of my boat in safe harbor looking and wondering when the storm is going to break up. That is no fun and the primary reason why I have not done it.

  11. #11
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    Default

    I have ran a 21' Phantom Sportsman with a 350 Vortec out of the mouth of the Kenai across the inlet numerous times. Picking the right time to go is important. Leaving the Kenai a couple hours prior to high tide on a good weather will get you up into the McArthur river at optimal time. The first tributary you come to on the north side of the McArthur is actually the Chakachatna River but it is ****ed upstream by beavers and is more of a slough. Farther up river is where most of the water from the Chak actually enters the McArthur. From the looks of it the river is very braided in this area an would take some time exploring to find a route up in towards the mountains where you could get into the class V or VI rapids. You might want to plan a pretty serious expedition for this one. Would be fun though.

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