Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Leash training

  1. #1
    Member aces-n-eights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    189

    Default Leash training

    We have a 7 yo mix breed pet dog. He's a great dog/friend and is mindful, respectful of the house and knows most common commands. He knows my wife and i are the 'big dogs' in the house and follows us up stairs and through doors.

    One of the habits i want to break is his pulling hard on the leash. Any suggestions for this training? I have not "googled" around to try to find dog training web sites - i'm sure there are many - i just thought i'd toss a question out here first.

    Thanks!
    English is an odd language. It can understood through tough thorough thought, though.

  2. #2

    Default

    Use a prong collar for walks. Prong collar + leash = power steering for dogs.

  3. #3

    Default

    You have to "teach" a verbal command that means to walk beside you. Typically that command is "heel". I like using slip leads because when it is in proper position it sits right in the smallest part of the dogs neck which is high on the neck not low like most usual chain chokers and prongs sit. Being high up on the neck allows me to have complete control of the dogs head and is easier to maneuver the dog the direction I want. I'm simply moving the head instead of trying to move the whole body like the low riding collars.
    You also need to be able to give a proper leash correction and also know when to time it. Always start your walk from a position of being under control. Which is the sit position. From there you command "heel" either on left or right side. The dogs head should be along side your knee. Here's the secret. Let the dog go up in front of you about a bodies length. It's the rule of giving enough rope to allow your dog to hang himself with. You don't want to correct your dog with pressure beside you. When the dog is in front you make it unpleasant to be there. You do this by giving a few quick jerks on the slip lead. Don't yank his head off just enough to get his attention. When you do this you say "heel" maybe several times and use a hand gesture to invite him to that side of you. You are inviting him calmly back to your side where there is no pressure. Beside you is the good place to be not out in front. Continue your walk. If he goes out again....let him.....and then correct again. At any time you feel that you are loosing total control. Stop and start from the sitting position again. Also when the dog is beside you your lead should be slack. No leash pressure when the dog is beside you. If you have a dog that has a problem walking a straight line and wants to go in ever which direction. Have your dog heel between you and a fence line or you and a wall. For me, with this method I can have a dog that will pull you across the parking lot heeling beside me in about 10 minutes. It's going to be tough at first until the dog learns what you are asking of him. From there you can start teaching the dog to turn with you. But that is another lesson.
    If you are local maybe I can help if you need it.

  4. #4
    Member aces-n-eights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    189

    Default

    Thanks guys! I will definitely give your system of training a try, Wetlands. I have a prong collar and it helps, but he still pulls with it too much. I do not have a slip lead and will give that a try.

    I think i'm on the right track as we have started doing exactly what you suggested, but have not been consistent enough with the training.

    He spent a year with our daughter who is in college, so now he expects beer and pizza on fridays and has not had much "heel" training. We'll get him going!
    English is an odd language. It can understood through tough thorough thought, though.

  5. #5
    Moderator Adison's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    236

    Default Consistancy helps

    You also might want to consider doing your training at the same time of the day. Once the dog understands that you are there to learn and have fun, he/she will respond quicker to the training, especially when it's done at the same time each day.
    Adison

  6. #6

    Default

    I'm not against a prong collar.......for now.
    My opinion is Bigger hardware is just a crutch when obedience needs to be addressed. Teach and you will no longer need such hardware.

    Consistency in your training is important. That is for every member in your family. Each person in your household should practice with your dog as well. An exercise routine is what I believe Adison is hinting out. Obedience is expected out of your dog at anytime during the day. Dogs do get use to a scheduled day and respond better when they are able to exert the energy. Do so in a structured manner in order to maintain and hone your new obedience skills.
    Have fun and reward when your dog does well.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    chugiak, ak
    Posts
    630

    Smile Consistancy!!!

    Like adison said, consistancy is huge!!!! Everyone in the family must be on the same page! That is a MUST!! I found training the wife and daughter on this was harder than training the dog!!
    Training times. I agree that training the same time of day is good, but once they "get it" try it at different times of the day. Short training sesions (15 min) during the day on your day off work great! Always try to end a training session on a good note, do something easy if thats what it takes, then reward them. I always train right before dinner for the dogs, they know once they are done training, they get a bowl of food!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •