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Thread: whats a man gotta do to catch some lakers

  1. #1
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Default whats a man gotta do to catch some lakers

    Hi, im wondering about what depth you guys are finding some lakers at. I have tried a few times with little to show for it. thanks

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Where are you trying? Are lakers present? While I love fishing Long Lake, I don't catch fish there. The population of lakers seems low needs time to rebound. A catch and release only reg for a few years would really help out. It could be a great fishery with more catch and release fishing.

    Most of mine are caught toplining down to 35 feet. If you read all the laker websites for down south (IE: Flaming Gorge and Tahoe) you will be way too deep for northern fish. They are above the thermocline.

    Read up here:

    http://www.broadwaters.fsnet.co.uk/physical.htm

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    Member FISHFOOL's Avatar
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    Default Catching Lakers

    I fish for Lakers four months out of the year. Most are caught at 40 to 65 feet below the surface. The big ones are caught right on the bottom. I troll a flatfish 50 feet behind the downrigger ball and drop the downrigger ball on the bottom letting it bounce and make clouds of dust by dragging it through the bottom. I troll the flatfish between .5 and 1 mph. Seems to work for me. We catch some nice big Lakers 20 pounds or more each year.

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    Member LungShot's Avatar
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    Default I agree

    Quote Originally Posted by dirtofak View Post
    Where are you trying? Are lakers present? While I love fishing Long Lake, I don't catch fish there. The population of lakers seems low needs time to rebound. A catch and release only reg for a few years would really help out. It could be a great fishery with more catch and release fishing.

    Most of mine are caught toplining down to 35 feet. If you read all the laker websites for down south (IE: Flaming Gorge and Tahoe) you will be way too deep for northern fish. They are above the thermocline.

    Read up here:

    http://www.broadwaters.fsnet.co.uk/physical.htm

    IMO the entire state should be catch and release only for lake trout.

  5. #5
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LungShot View Post
    IMO the entire state should be catch and release only for lake trout.
    And your opinion is based on?

    What if the laker population is high? Can we not harvest the bounty?

    IMO - Fisheries should be able to support a decent amount of "take home". I realize that the balance can become upset and regulations can become necessary to bring them back into balance.

    A fishery such as Long Lake that has a population of "fish" that were long believed history deserves to have a catch and release reg to ensure that those tough critters get a chance to repopulate. Cost - updating a reg, a website and a sign at the boat launch. Much cheaper than repopulating with hatchery fish.

  6. #6

    Default Long lake- Catch and Release

    I agree about Long lake, they are plenty of small lakers in the lake. If it was catch and release for a couple of years this lake could have some real trophy fish. I would rather go to a local stocked lake and catch salmon and dollies to eat then take slow growing lake trout for table fare. Just a thought for some people who don't really care what they kill to eat. I know, lake trout are also good eating.

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    Default How deep do you catch a Laker

    I believe that was the question.

    not another hijack for C & R debate, please!

    shallow as 10-15' after ice out. mostly trolling rapalas, size huge

    deep as 80-100' in the fall. mainly jigging herring cut bait

  8. #8

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    I'll humor the CR deal. Just a simple point. Realize that some lakes dont have it in them to grow trophy lakers. So many of those small laker lakes that you take from, thinking that a few years down the road there's going to be the canada version of gargantuan lakers showing up might be sorely dissappointed.

    As for how deep. There's only one way to know. Marcum Lx5. It really doesnt get any easier then that.

    I will say this about lakers, they are truely an extremely slow growing fish. I dont sqauld those too hard that keep overly big fish, but I dont nessicarly agree with it either when it comes to lakers. Just be aware, some of those 20 25 and 30lb fish you are landing may be as old or older then you are!

    A simple slot limit would allow those who want to eat fish, a window of opportunity and those who desire to find bigger fish or atleast allow a lake the chance to allow fish to get big to do so, do it. There is no perfect solution however it is one of the better options going for atleast this particular fishery, that is Alaska Lake trout!

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    Member LungShot's Avatar
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    Default My opinion, and some advice on catching

    My opinion is based on 20 plus yrs fishing lakers, and seeing what happens to lakes where a regulation is put into place as a REaction rather than a PREaction. Reactions might help trout or other faster growing fish but by the time you react to Lakers it's to late, and they will take a decade to fully rebound (IMO).
    I just love catching lakers, and since they grow so slow I wish they could be catch, and release only. There are some lakes I visit every spring, and we catch 40 plus lakers in the couple days we spend there. I have a fear of people fishing them out one day. I guess slot limits would work to though.

    Now for some advice. Sorry to High Jack on my earlier post.

    I only fish Lakers in the spring. The action is pretty consistent from the time the ice goes out till 3 weeks to a month after. I dont use down riggers, and I dont have any set depth I fish at. I use a 14 ft aluminum boat with a little 4 stroke 6 horse motor. I troll as slow as possible using anything from Krocidiles to Rapala's to Swedish pimples. I mix up the weights, and lures till I find what there really hot on, and I stick with it for a while. It seems to change every year. 2 yrs ago I used a small silver Krocidile, and I couldn't have my line in the water for more than 5 minutes without a hook up. I mostly catch 4 to 5 lbs fish with my biggest being 11lbs. Suppose I could spend more time trolling deep but the action with the smaller ones is hard to break away from. My theory is they cruise much like sharks: really deep but shallow enough they can see bait fish above them using the light above. Then they can ambush from below. I love it when the water starts churning with baitfish, and then casting into it. It's a garunteed hook up. Also if your fishing with another person, and one of you hooks up cut the motor reel the fish in a bit then have the other guy cast behind the fish. This will usually result in another hook up (double hook up). Is seems they work together at times schooling the baitfish real tight then darting in and out to feed. In the evening just before dark I troll as close as possible to a shelf that drops from shallow to deep. If the sun is out or it's mid day I throw on a little more weight, and get out a little deeper. Sometimes I will even walk the shore, and fish creek outlets. I have picked up only smaller Lakers doing that though. If you hook a fish with any size Ive noticed they let you reel them in fairly easy then when they get near the boat they dive straight down with a fury so you better have your drag set. Once they get down pretty deep they do a sorta death roll similar to pike or an alligator. If there gonna throw the hook this is usually when they do it so keep your line tight, and be ready in case they shoot back up which will give you slack line hence another opputunity for them to escape. Ive also noticed In the spring that they really bunch up in certain area's. Some spots on the lake will almost never produce fish even though the depth is there while other spots produce over, and over. Learning your lake is key. Find the bait fish.

    Hope this helps.

  10. #10
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Default

    My opinion Lake trout are yummy.

    I like them 15 pounds and under.

    I would not want to keep a 30 pounder as it may be 40 years old. I would take lots of pics and get measurements for a reproduction mount.

    I like Flathead lake trout regs. 50 daily, only one over 36" and all between 30 and 36 inches must be released.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  11. #11
    Member LungShot's Avatar
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    Default up late

    Man R Miller I thought I was the only one up this late surfing these threads. Fellow night owl?

    Is Flathead in the lower 48? If it's up here ive never fished it. Sounds like that slot limit keeps the gene pool healthy and plenty of spawners. Thats good.

    I cant believe Ive never eclipsed 11lbs! Your talking about eating 15 pounders, and with all these years fishing them I havent even caught one near that big. Makes me sick.

    By the way next week I will be buying my $400 plane ticket from Juneau to Anc just to go laker fishing for 2 days in early June. Not to mention $150 in gas to get there, and back plus food ect. Thats how much I love it!

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by LungShot View Post
    Man R Miller I thought I was the only one up this late surfing these threads. Fellow night owl?

    Is Flathead in the lower 48? If it's up here ive never fished it. Sounds like that slot limit keeps the gene pool healthy and plenty of spawners. Thats good.

    I cant believe Ive never eclipsed 11lbs! Your talking about eating 15 pounders, and with all these years fishing them I havent even caught one near that big. Makes me sick.

    By the way next week I will be buying my $400 plane ticket from Juneau to Anc just to go laker fishing for 2 days in early June. Not to mention $150 in gas to get there, and back plus food ect. Thats how much I love it!
    It is in Montana, and it is huge. Really huge. But, I don't think lakers are a native fish in that lake, they were introduced.

  13. #13

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    And, they are wiping out native cutts and dolly populations, not to mention they are the ones to blame (along with overfishing probably) for the kokanee crash about a decade ago in the lake.

  14. #14
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Default Bigger baits

    LUNGSHOT.

    I have never caught one that big. I have only caught about a dozen lake trout in about 4 tries.

    My biggest one was 22" and 4#.

    --

    Here is a little story:

    I was at Lake Louise Trolling like crazy for two days. I caught 8 lakers including the 4 pounder above. Mostly using a lot of the lures you had mentioned. Stuff I use for rainbows now. 2-4 inch plugs and 1/4 ounce crocs, swedish pimples and such.
    My dad and his friend mostly told stories and drank beer. On the third day we were leaving and breaking camp and my dad and his friend decided they would give fishing a try. My dad took a look through my tackle box and grabbed a couple of my salmon lures. Wiggle warts and a 1/4 tadpolly.
    My dad and his friend head out in the boat and after a half hour they come back. I am thinking they are lazy bums but my dad asks in an urgent voice if I have another one of those "tadpole lures". I laughed and gave him my last one, a 1/2 ounce tadpolly.
    About an hour later they come back and say they are ready to leave cause they caught their fish. One laker 16 pounds.
    The first tadpolly had hooked a much larger laker and was lost at the boat on 4# test (dads trout rod). The second tadpolly caught the 16 pounder on 17 pound line (dads king pole).

    --
    one of my friends caught his largest laker on a 16 kwikfish (ice out lake louise).

    Another friend likes 4 inch flatfish (hidden lake) This would not be to big for rainbows.

    Flathead fishermen routinely use k15-16 size kwikfish, flatfish.


    http://www.fishsniffer.com/wiza/050320lures.html
    Last edited by RMiller; 04-08-2008 at 13:30.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  15. #15
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Default

    Kwikfish in sizes K14,K15 & K16 as well as Flatfish in sizes T50,T55 & T60 are extremely good. You can also catch plenty using Daredevil Husky Jr spoons, we use these as well as Husky Sr's in the NWT. The seniors may be a little big fro your lakers. Another main stay is lake trolls with a herring.
    We troll as shallow as a foot or so just after ice out!!! We will troll shallow sand beach areas using flatfish or kwikfish 100-150 feet behing the boat.
    The trout are in the warmer shallows feeding and the commotion that the lure digging into the sand really turn them on. We will fish shallow out to 20 FOW until the surface temps reach 55 degrees. By this time the fish are starting to move into their summer patterns. We then start to fish drop offs, humps and rock piles in 15 to 40 feet. By mid summer we fish mid lake flats 25 to 70 feet deep using the same lures all the time.
    We will use inline sinkers to 6 ounces to get the lures down and riggers for the lake trolls and bait. Lake Trout are notorious followers so troll in s patterns and mix up your speeds. Also when fishing spoons give your spoon some action by pumping the rod a couple of times a minute to entice those followers. I have seen under water video of lakers following a flatfish on a downrigger for miles and not just one fish. Imagine 5 or 10 lakers all following the lure and taking turns coming in to have a look see, but never hitting.
    I almost forgot, you can fish them just like walleye by jigging over structure.

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