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Thread: Proper Revolver Handling

  1. #1
    Member RainGull's Avatar
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    Default Proper Revolver Handling

    Seeing the flame cut thumb thread about the fella with the 500 S&W sticking his thumb out, and then seeing this with the support hand index finger wrapped around the front of the trigger guard:

    http://www.gunsandammomag.com/imrt_082207/
    by Ruger National Sales Manager Jim McConville, made me wonder what exactly is proper wheelgun handling?

    Personally I place my support hand entirely below the trigger guard wrapped around my control hand with the thumb parallel to the control arm thumb (though many seem to cross thumbs which seems wrong to me).
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

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    Member RainGull's Avatar
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    Found this while looking for a photo of my preferred:
    http://www.handgunsmag.com/tactics_training/grip_0925/

    It seems to favor the crossed thumbs approach. Anybody use that method? Which thumb do you use to thumb the hammer in single action? Do you uncross your thumbs or use the support hand thumb to cock the hammer (that is what the article recommends)?
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

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    New member elkbustr's Avatar
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    Default Handgun grip

    The grip in the photos appears to be too far down on the revolver. Especially for the larger calibers. The web of the palm should be up to the spur of the revolver. The thumb of the weak hand can then lock the strong hand thumb by holding the strong thumb down against the side of the revolver.

    I personally do not shoot a double action revolver in the single action mode. If I shoot a single action revolver, I use the strong thumb to cock the hammer and go back to the two hand grip.

    To each his/her own. Keep a strong grip and practice it.

    Shoot low when the bad guys are ridin' Shetlands!!!

    Elkbustr

  4. #4

    Default RainGull....ck this site out

    http://alaskatactical.com/menu.html take one of the revolver classes they offer and you will learn more than you thought you ever would....

  5. #5

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    I shoot with my off-hand thumb crossed over, clamped over the meaty part between the thumb & index finger. A lot of instructors will teach the parallel method, but I feel this is something that came into practice when automatics became popular. I think crossing the thumb provides a much more solid grip than is possible with the parallel position, but is only doable with handguns with no slide. Obviously, one must also watch for the hammer as well.

    Seeing someone like him grip the guard is a bit surprising, but a lot of people shoot with bad habbits their entire life.

    Edit: I found this link to some other odd grip techniques. It's amazing what some people do. http://www.corneredcat.com/Basics/grip.aspx
    Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RainGull View Post
    Found this while looking for a photo of my preferred:
    http://www.handgunsmag.com/tactics_training/grip_0925/

    It seems to favor the crossed thumbs approach. Anybody use that method? Which thumb do you use to thumb the hammer in single action? Do you uncross your thumbs or use the support hand thumb to cock the hammer (that is what the article recommends)?

    You're saying that wrong. Crossed thumbs is when you put the right shooting hand thumb on the left side of the gun and the left support hand thumb on the right side of the revolver over the base of the right thumb. You should never cross your thumbs for revolver or semi auto as an injury is sure to result.

    Your pic shows a thumb on thumb hold and that is correct. The top hold is considered a single action bulls eye shooter hold and the wrapped down thumb in the second photo is to add control to a single hand, double action shoot. Also one of the advantages of this thumb on thumb grip is that it isn't lessened by the shooting thumb being used to cock the gun. The support thumb cocks the gun as it comes down from recoil. We remain locked up and shoot fast and accurate single.

    I agree with you the support hand should be back behind the trigger guard and wrapped around the shooting hand, thumb on thumb or thumb beside thumb. We need to apply some down force to counter the flipping action of the recoil for quicker recovery and that is aided by the stacking of the thumbs.

    I don't forsee any severed digits with the support hand forward of the trigger guard hold but there will be some particulate matter from the gap hitting the pinkys. Of course guns for photo ops rarely have any ammo in them even though this on looks as if it has been shot and is loaded.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    I shoot with my off-hand thumb crossed over, clamped over the meaty part between the thumb & index finger. A lot of instructors will teach the parallel method, but I feel this is something that came into practice when automatics became popular. I think crossing the thumb provides a much more solid grip than is possible with the parallel position, but is only doable with handguns with no slide. Obviously, one must also watch for the hammer as well.

    Seeing someone like him grip the guard is a bit surprising, but a lot of people shoot with bad habbits their entire life.

    Edit: I found this link to some other odd grip techniques. It's amazing what some people do. http://www.corneredcat.com/Basics/grip.aspx
    I don't think you grip is a good idea and it isn't the strongest or most stable way to hold, plus it would get you into trouble if you pick up something with a moving slide.

    Kathy's teaching the right stuff. The non stacked thumbs is when we ride the safety for the Browning lock work, the support thumb is pressed on the near side for stability while the shooting thumb holds the safety down and keeps it there. Those first three are correct. The thumb on thumb grip locks everything in place and never moves when shooting semi auto or when shooting double action revolver.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    I shoot with my off-hand thumb crossed over, clamped over the meaty part between the thumb & index finger. A lot of instructors will teach the parallel method, but I feel this is something that came into practice when automatics became popular. I think crossing the thumb provides a much more solid grip than is possible with the parallel position, but is only doable with handguns with no slide. Obviously, one must also watch for the hammer as well.

    Seeing someone like him grip the guard is a bit surprising, but a lot of people shoot with bad habbits their entire life.

    Edit: I found this link to some other odd grip techniques. It's amazing what some people do. http://www.corneredcat.com/Basics/grip.aspx
    There are a lot of odd grips out there and if you shoot the big magnums, you'll find out fairly quickly where not to have body parts. I favor the parallel thumbs grip because the base of my weak hand palm perfectly nestles into the hollow in front of my strong hand's palm (on the side of the grip). Weak hand fingers are wrapped around the strong hand fingers. This leaves nothing behind the gun (above the web of your strong hand) to get smacked or cut and nothing in front of the cylinder, and the firmness of the grip helps with follow-through. Just my 2-bits. It was how I was taught and I've never found a grip that works better than that ...for me anyway.

    Brian

  9. #9

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    I prefer locked thumbs for revolvers and currently use that grip for my semi auto XD. I know I should be using thumbs forward, and might switch in the near future. Currently I'm thinking of buying a 10mm. I think I have narrowed down my choices to a glock 20 or a DW commander bobtail. If I go with the DW it will be thumbs forward from that point on. Good practice? Probably not but thumbs locked with my XD is a very comfortable grip for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Water_Gremlin View Post
    I prefer locked thumbs for revolvers and currently use that grip for my semi auto XD. I know I should be using thumbs forward, and might switch in the near future. Currently I'm thinking of buying a 10mm. I think I have narrowed down my choices to a glock 20 or a DW commander bobtail. If I go with the DW it will be thumbs forward from that point on. Good practice? Probably not but thumbs locked with my XD is a very comfortable grip for me.
    You know? I went shooting last night and took a little closer look at my habits. I had forgotten that the locked thumbs deal didn't work on my 500 S&W because my left-hand thumb ends up bumping the back end of the cylinder. I actually keep my left hand thumb tight on top of my left-hand as though it were wrapping around my right-hand like my fingers do. I use a modified weaver stance where I shoot right-handed but use my left-eye for the sights (I'm horribly left-eye dominant and my right eye is crap for things too close ...like within 3 feet.) Unlike some that use a similarly modified Weaver, I do not tilt the gun towards my left in order to help line up the sights with my eye ...that's fine for in-home combat shooting against a perp, but not for longer distance shooting outdoors unless you like missing low and left. While my type of grip may not be the very firmest grip on its own, it works fine if you use a strong opposing-force (and you should anyway) type of grip, i.e. the strong-hand pushes forward firmly while the weak hand pulls back firmly. This really clamps the gun tightly in your grip and I find that even with stronger trigger pulls (SA or DA) that I can keep the gun right on the target throughout the trigger pull and firing, and then have better follow-through and control after the shot. I have big hands so I can't just use any grip that I want without something about the process not working, but the above is what works for me with this gun. Little guns drive me nuts except for my wife's compact XD9, which for some reason (ergonomics), that gun is a real natural shooter for me ...and her. Point and shoot, got it! Say what you want about Springfield, but that gun's a nice little machine.

    Brian

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    I don't think you grip is a good idea and it isn't the strongest or most stable way to hold, plus it would get you into trouble if you pick up something with a moving slide.
    All I can do is shrug; I'm aware that my prefered grip doesn't work for automatics, but they're more or less novelty weapons to me and I rarely fire them. I'm certainly aware that good finger placement is important to provide support without risking injury, especially when firing magnums. But your point is taken... perhaps it would be smart of me to use the parallel-thumb method at least whenever encountering a gun I'm not familiar with. I'm comfortable with my grip with my guns, though. I don't see how shifting the thumb away from a natural grasping position would increase strength.

    I bet what's comfortable & supportive for one person might not work well for another. If you think about it, we all cross our arms differently, sit differently, etc. I suspect some people out there also use some odd grip techiniques in order to grab handguns that are too large or too small for their hands.

    A side story: 9-10 years ago a friend of my brother's - we'll call him Marty - went target practicing with him one day. They were firing a scoped .22 rifle, and my brother commented on Marty's unusual stance, saying "Are you sure you know what you're doing?" "Oh yeah sure, I do this all the time!" The next thing you know, the scope gave Marty a black eye. That'll happen when you hold the rifle bazooka style.
    Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

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    Member RainGull's Avatar
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    When I was quite young, my family was shooting at Moose Creek Bluff and I was firing a Ruger Mark II. I don't know why but on the last shot (the one after which the action locks fully back) I held it right up to my eye and about fired. Dad stopped me. Kids! Glad my parents didn't have any!
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

  13. #13

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    I use the same grip on my .45 auto and revolvers that is shown in Rain Gull's picture The left hand pulls back and the finger on the front of the trigger guard helps to keep the gun from twisting and gives a quick return to sight alignment. The right hand pushes ahead into the left hand . I don't worry about the thumbs they are pointed ahead. I don't worry about gas from the cylinder and on the larger revolvers the face of the cylinder is even farther ahead of the trigger guard so there is no problem there It keeps your wrist joints in a mis match for a better lock up.. Good shooting.

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